apocalypse

Posts tagged
with apocalypse



Art Photography

Theatrically Composed Scenes Highlight Human’s Impact on Earth

March 10, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

"Logic of Spring" (2015)

“Logic of Spring” (2015), all images @ Robert & Shana ParkeHarrison / image courtesy Catherine Edelman Gallery, Chicago.

Robert and Shana ParkeHarrison have been a collaborative duo for the last 20 years, mixing Shana’s interest in dance with Robert’s background in photography to produce environments specifically for their combined practice. A constant theme throughout the couple’s two decade long work has been man’s effect on the landscape—showcasing how we are constantly influencing, and more often than not damaging, the Earth.

“We create works in response to the ever-bleakening relationship linking humans, technology, and nature,” says the ParkeHarrison’s artist statement. “These works feature an ambiguous narrative that offers insight into the dilemma posed by science and technology’s failed promise to fix our problems, provide explanations, and furnish certainty pertaining to the human condition. Strange scenes of hybridizing forces, swarming elements, and bleeding overabundance portray Nature unleashed by technology and the human hand.”

Recently the work has reflected the pair’s love of theater and performance, with pieces such as Intermission (2015) and Soliloquy (2015) showcasing stages large and small set inside larger post-apocalyptic scenes. In Riverview (2015) the subject holds a tapestry in front of a rundown carnival, an image of a beautiful river masking what may have paved over its former place. In First of May (2015) the subject listens closely to two megaphones in a hazy field, perhaps searching for wisdom from nature rather than man.

The ParkeHarrison’s exhibition Precipice opens March 11 at Catherine Edelman Gallery in Chicago and runs through April 30, 2016. You can see more of the couple’s work on the gallery’s website.

"Soujourn" (2015)

“Sojourn” (2015)

"Precipice" (2015)

“Precipice” (2015)

"Intermission" (2015)

“Intermission” (2015)

"Downpour" (2015)

“Downpour” (2015)

"Riverview" (2015)

“Riverview” (2015)

"Soliloquy" (2015)

“Soliloquy” (2015)

"First of May" (2015)

“First of May” (2015)

"Nature Morte" (2015)

“Nature Morte” (2015)

 

 



Art

Fantastical Paintings of Animals Within Post-Apocalyptic Environments by Martin Wittfooth

January 12, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

Wittfooth_08

Martin Wittfooth transposes the temperament we typically associate with large animals to those much smaller, painting foxes and birds as the heroic victors of this works while making larger animals much more passive and calm. Each of his paintings feature these creatures in environments that deviate from the peaceful surrounding we would expect—trash and decay littering the the ground while smog fills the sky.

“As a species we share a pretty significant degree of similar reactions to the natural world: there are forms in nature that we seem to have innate responses to,” said Wittfooth in an interview with beinArt. “Like a sense of awe or respect for large mammals, and revulsion for spiders and snakes. I’m interested in this kind of shared pattern recognition and instinctive responses. I’m pretty invested in trying to imbue my paintings with some sense of ‘presence’ and hence am working with subject matter that can impart an emotional reading of it, not just a rational (strictly observing) analysis.”

The Brooklyn-based painter’s work is included with 27 other artists fascinated with the wild form in the new book Juxtapoz Wild. You can see more of Wittfooth’s work on his Facebook page here. (via Juxtapoz)

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Wittfooth_01

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Wittfooth_09

Wittfooth_05

Wittfooth_02

Wittfooth_07

 

 



Design

Glow-In-The-Dark Day and Night Poster Reveals Crime, Sex, Guns and Zombies

October 11, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Jason Dean’s (previously) latest print appears to depict a quaint little town, but flip out the lights and a slick glow-in-the-dark treatment reveals a city crawling with criminals, arsonists, prostitutes and, yes, zombies. This is a hand-pulled 9-color screen print including two different layers of phosphorescent inks printed on 100 lb. white stock, signed and numbered in an edition of only 60. (thnx, jason!)

 

 



Art

Thomas Doyle’s Apocalyptic Dioramas

September 19, 2011

Christopher Jobson


(click images for detail)

Using materials that would equally be at home amongst idyllic model train sets artist Thomas Doyle builds these incredibly intricate mixed media dioramas that instead suggest something much darker. The sense of loss and a brooding darkness is present in almost every piece, where homes dangle on sheer cliffs, or are surrounded by apocalyptic waste. The four pieces above entitled A corrective, Refuge, The barrage lifts, and Firing for effect are among the most recent works from his Distillation series, which I strongly urge you to click through if you’ve never encountered his work before.

I found Thomas Doyle while working my way through the strangely-named but enjoyable Gorky’s Granddaughter, an interview series by Christopher Joy and Zachary Keeting who sit down and chat casually with incredible artists. Good stuff.

 

 



Art

Abstract Apocalypse: The Paintings of Konstantin Batynkov

April 11, 2011

Christopher Jobson

This weekend while looking through a couple dozen Russian art gallery web sites (isn’t that how you spend your weekend?) I discovered these truly surreal paintings by Moscow-based Konstantin Batynkov. I urge you to click on his works to view them larger, as it’s difficult to discern exactly what’s happening in the frenzied brush strokes of each painting. Helicopters and skydivers dot the sky like the black plumes of anti-aircraft fire, while dinosaurs and knights on horseback joust on the horizon. Flying submarines, hovering trains of semi-trailer trucks, everything quixotic and anarchistic all at once. Really amazing stuff.

 

 



Illustration Photography

Giacomo Costa: Post Natural

March 30, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Incredible apocalyptic urban landscapes from Italian artist Giacomo Costa who lives and works in Florence. His latest exhibition, Post Natural, can be seen at Galerie Voss in Düsseldorf starting April 1.

 

 



Design

The Resource Exhaustion Crisis Evacuation Safety Shelter

September 14, 2010

Christopher Jobson







Artist Chad Person has spent years constructing, fortifying, and concealing a safety shelter (dubbed RECESS) that will allow him to survive the collapse of civilization. He has constructed weapons and surveillance systems, detailed resource maps, as well as animal traps, solar ovens, and the general acquisition of survival skills.

RECESS began 2 years ago when I made my home in the southwest United States. Like much of the West, our reliance on the continuous import of vital resources (food, water, medical supplies) is unsustainable and untenable. Crisis preparedness is vital, and RECESS is my answer. It is a re-model, an insurance policy, an experiment, a test of personal mettle, and an obsession. Survival is everything.

(via sub-studio)

 

 

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Sailing Ship Kite