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Design

Neko Cup Creates Adorable Napping Cat Sand Sculptures

July 16, 2019

Johnny Waldman

If you’re walking along the beach this summer and you see a group of napping cat sand sculptures, there’s a good chance it’s the work of a Neko Cup (neko is the Japanese word for cat). Neko Cup is the latest product from Japanese design brand h-concept. Made from biomass plastic (bamboo and scallop shells) the hollowed out object creates a silhouette of a napping cat.

It can be used on the beach, in your park’s sandbox and, in the winter, with snow. And when it’s not in use, it also functions as ab adorable little sculpture. Designer Yuka Morii says she loves seeing cats sleeping on the sidewalk and she wanted to preserve that warm feeling she gets when she spots one out of the corner of her eye.

If you’re in Japan you can purchase one from the h-concept online shop. They come in white, beige and black and retail for 2,916 yen ($26.95). (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Art

The Sandy Cliffs and Blue Skies of Martha’s Vineyard Abstracted into Paintings by Rachael Cassiani

June 23, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Moshup Moment. Images: Field Gallery

Massachusetts-based artist Rachael Cassiani finds inspiration in her local beaches, dunes, and cloud-strewn skies to create abstract landscape paintings in various sizes and shapes. With a limited but vibrant color palette, Cassiani strips each scene down to its essential elements. Different shapes and hues create the illusion of depth and separation between air, land, and sea.

“I choose the structure of the paintings by looking at my scene and seeing where the most dominant hues are,” Rachael Cassiani said in a statement. “I exaggerate the natural colors of the original landscape.” While painting almost exclusively in the Martha’s Vineyard and Vineyard Haven areas of Massachusetts, Cassiani manages to capture her surroundings in a way that is not repetitive or homogeneous. The time of day and changing seasons completely alter the view, as does the artist’s choices regarding positioning and perspective. Swirls and daubs of oil paint add texture to some of the works, but they each feel like a small piece of a larger abstract puzzle.

To see more of Cassiani’s paintings, follow the artist on Instagram.

The Cliff Side.

To the Beach / Sunset Shapes

Swimming in Blue

A Day In the Dunes

Beach Roses

Expressive Cliff Side

Sepiessa Sky

Summer on Tashmoo

 

 



Art Craft

Embroidered and Beaded Coral Sculptures by Aude Bourgine Honor the ‘Lungs of the Oceans’ in Protective Glass

December 20, 2018

Andrew LaSane

French visual artist Aude Bourgine’s work is informed by her love of the environment and a sense of guilt for what humanity has done to the natural world. Using textiles, beads, and sequins, the artist creates displays that capture the beauty and fragility of coral for a series called “Poumons des océans,” which translates to “Lungs of the Oceans.”

Bourgine’s sculptures mimic the unique shapes, intricate textures, and vivid colors of living coral. Encased in glass bell jars, they are simultaneously isolated as objects of wonder, and also protected from harm caused by the hands of humans. “If we do not rapidly change our relationship with our environment, oceans will be dead by 2050,” the artist said in a statement on her website. “Their disappearance will entail a disastrous imbalance on all ecological, climate and human levels…We must take heed for this universal cause, which concerns each and every one of us.”

Bourgine has an upcoming solo exhibition at the Saint Julien Chapel in Le Petit-Quevilly in northern France from June 7 through 30, 2019. You can see more of Bourgine’s sculptural works of the sea on Instagram. (via The Fiber Studio)

 

 



Photography

Dramatic Perspectives Capture Uniquely Juxtaposed Beachgoers in Street Photography by Moises Levy

October 26, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Giant 1

Giant 1, all images via Moises Levy

Mexico City-based photographer and architect Moises Levy captures unique moments of human and animal interaction in his street photography, most often centered around activities at the beach. By shooting at a low angle, Levy captures slackline and tightrope walkers in the frame of someone’s legs, or a horse at just the right pace to make it seems as if a woman has walked directly underneath its snout. All of his images are backlit to create high contrast black and white images that present his figures more as silhouettes than subjects. You can see more of his beach photography on Instagram.

Funny Feet

Funny Feet

Above

Above

Trapped

Trapped

Levitation

Levitation

Horse 1

Horse 1

Hungry Dog

Hungry Dog

Top of the World

Top of the World

Horse 2

Gime Five

Gime Five

 

 



Art

Theo Jansen’s New Strandbeest Roams the Beach Like an Undulating Caterpillar

August 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Earlier this summer artist Theo Jansen (previously) revealed UMINAMI, a new addition to his series of wind-powered strandbeests. The kinetic sculpture is much thinner than previous iterations, and is made without hinging joints so it does not need to be lubricated when roving along the sandy shore. The fabricated creature seems to imitate the motion of a crawling caterpillar, producing an undulating movement as it sweeps across the beach. You can watch other strandbeests in motion on Youtube. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 



Art

Lines in the Sand: Artist Jim Denevan Turns Beaches into Temporary Geometric Artworks

March 27, 2017

Christopher Jobson

For well over a decade California artist Jim Denevan (previously) has made his mark in the sand, etching elaborate geometric artworks on beaches around the world using little more than a rake or found stick. The pieces last only a few hours, or begin disappearing even as he works, as the tides quickly erase each design leaving only a memory or a photograph. Great Big Story recently visited Denevan and shot this brief profile of the artist as he created a number of pieces.

 

 



Art Photography

Over Two Decades of Charting the Various Movements of Snails by Photographer Daniel Ranalli

January 18, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

“Spiral #9” (1996)

For more than 20 years photographer Daniel Ranalli has been actively collaborating with the ecology of Cape Cod, with one of his most collaborative projects being his Snail Drawing series. The works each contain two images, the first capturing the snails in a simplified pattern of Ranalli’s choosing on the beach, and the second showcasing the ways the snails have decided to move out of this neatly formed configuration. The second image allows the viewer to see the trace of the snail’s movement in the sand, the small bodies slowly scattering away from center.

“The best pieces depend on a certain degree of randomness for their success,” said Ranalli. “I tend to think of the snail pieces as a metaphor for the order we establish in our lives, and how the element of chance enters in to affect the result—regardless of how much we attempt to structure it.”

Some of Ranalli’s work will be exhibited with Laurence Miller Gallery this weekend at Classic Photographs Los Angeles from January 21-22. You can see more of his snail series as well as other gesture-based photography (like his Erased Chalkboard series) on his website. (via La Boite Verte)

“Stone Surrounded” (2014)

“Stick Square” (2013)

“Rock Vein #2” (2013)

“Long Rectangle” (1999)

“Infinity” (2013)

“Diminishing Line” (2013)

“Double Line #2” (2007)

“Cross #2” (2008)

“Circle #2” (2007)