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Art

Squishy Flesh Suits Quilted by Textile Artist Daisy Collingridge

January 18, 2020

Andrew LaSane

“Clive a portrait” (2019). All images © Daisy Collingridge, used with permission

London-based artist Daisy Collingridge layers amorphous blobs of fabric and textiles to form wearable pastel-colored body suits. With names like Burt, Clive, and Lippy, each member of Collingridge’s family has a personality that matches his/her form. Inspired by human anatomy and infused with elements of fantasy and impulse, the artist says that the costumes are an exercise in “pushing quilting to the absolute extreme.”

Each new character begins with the construction of the head. Hand-dyed jersey and other fabric patterns are filled with plastic pellets (beans) and sewn together to form blobs in various shapes and sizes. After the underlying body structure has been formed, Collingridge begins the process of hand-stitching the blobs to the wadding. She tells Colossal that she has never clocked the process but would estimate that it takes around two months on average. The “Dave” suit is named for and modeled by her father who requested it. The others are named “like children,” and are worn and photographed by the artist herself using a remote.

Progress shot

After graduating with a degree in fashion design from Central Saint Martins, Collingridge created her first costume in 2016 for the New Zealand-based design competition, World of Wearable Art. “The squishy idea definitely came from my graduate collection, which was all free machine quilted, but all done with really fat wadding,” she told Dazed Digital. “It wasn’t really your traditional patchwork quilt.”

Some have read Collingridge’s costumes as a commentary on body image and body ideals. “It’s really fascinating because as much as I can tell people what they mean or why I make these costumes, everyone comes at it with such a different view,” she told Dazed. “They are reflective of the human form with elements of fantasy. They neither promote or demote one body type. The idea there is an ‘ideal body’ is ridiculous. We are all so different, my work is more about the ‘ideal’ way to inhabit a body. To be joyous. They bring me joy to create and I hope that is reflected.”

Collingridge tells Colossal that her “Clive” costume is currently on tour as a part of 62 Group’s Ctrl/Shift exhibition, while the rest are at her human family’s home. “My dad unpacked Dave, who has been sitting in the living room over the festive period. He was even treated some Christmas lights.” To see the artist create and model the squishy bodies, follow her on Instagram.

“Burt lunge” (2018)

“Clive Feels Like” (2018)

“Crouching Tiger Hidden Hillary” (2019)

“Dave a portrait” (2019)

“Dave on his bed” (2019)

Progress shot

 

 



Art

Minimalist Paintings by Prudence Flint Emphasize the ‘Emotional Weight’ of Womanhood

January 14, 2020

Grace Ebert

“The Visit” (2016), oil on linen, 122 x 102 cm. All images © Prudence Flint

Focusing heavily on the female figure, painter Prudence Flint combines pastels and flat, geometric shapes in her minimalistic works. Rarely showing their faces directly, Flint’s oil paintings often portray women lying down, sitting, or performing daily tasks like showering while they look straight ahead, adding to the pieces’ pensive atmospheres.

In a recent interview with Juxtapoz, the painter expounded on why she mostly centers on women, saying she wants them “to be all things, whole, boundless, perverse, and representative of humanity. I want to give voice to this experience of being alive, now, in this culture, as a woman.” The ways Flint constructs female bodies exemplifies these ideas of womanhood, as she often paints small heads on top of broad torsos and long limbs.

As a woman, I feel constantly up against the idea of what is meant to be happening to me versus what is actually happening to me … I think I have found a solution by distorting the bodies, which becomes representative of what experience does to you. It marks you and creates emotional weight.

Flint’s self-portrait “The Wish” is on view from January 16 to 30 at High Line Nine in New York as part of ME, an exhibition that considers the relationship between identity and the face. If you can’t see the Melbourne-based artist’s paintings in person, head to Instagram where she shares much of her work.

“Double” (2018), oil on linen, 142 x 109 cm

Left: “Queen Anne Mirror” (2012), oil on linen, 122 x 102 cm. Right: “Shower #2” (2015), oil on linen, 122 x 102 cm

“The Fitting” (2019), oil on linen, 130 x 107 cm

“The Stand” (2019), oil on linen, 122 x 102 cm

“The Wake” (2018), oil on linen, 122 x 102 cm

Left: “Bedsit” (2016), oil on linen, 122 x 102 cm. Right: “Sewing Machine” (2012), oil on linen, 122 x 102 cm

“The Yard” (2019), oil on linen, 135 x 107 cm

 

 



Animation

Squirming Multi-Colored Bodies Dance Across the Screen in an Unsettling Animation by Mike Pelletier

August 8, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“Flurry” is a bizarre new animated short from the experimental artist Mike Pelletier. The two minute-long video features no obvious narrative. Rather, the animation is an exploration of movement and volume: an indeterminate number of humanoid figures seem to merge and divide as their flaccid limbs wiggle and squirm. Pelletier is Canadian and now based in Amsterdam. In a statement, the artist shares that “his work explores the various ways in which the human body is represented in art and the social milieu”. Watch more of Pelletier’s experiments on Vimeo (especially this deflated fruit animation) on Vimeo. Digital editions of the artist’s work are available in his online store.

 

 



Art

Crouched and Posed Figures Formed From Hundreds of Welded Bike Chains

October 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

“Anguish” (2018), 303 Stainless chain, 58 x 95 x 87 (h) cm

Young-Deok Seo (previously here and here) produces life-size figures welded from hundreds of folded bike chains. To create these works he first begins with a sketch, which he then digitizes to create a 3D model. Next he creates a full-scale rendition from clay, which serves as both his foundation and mold for the welded chains. Despite the many bends and curves of the chains’ hinges, the final forms perfectly outline the intricate details of human ears, torsos, and hands. The Korean artist as an upcoming solo exhibition curated by Liquid Art System at Abbazia della Misericordia in from late March to mid-April 2019. You can see more of his figurative sculptures on Instagram and Facebook.

"Anguish" (2018), 255 Iron chain, 92 x 63 x 67 (h) cm, all images provided by Young-Deok Seo

“Anguish” (2018), 255 Iron chain, 92 x 63 x 67 (h) cm, all images provided by Young-Deok Seo

"Anguish" (2018), 255 Iron chain, 92 x 63 x 67 (h) cm

“Anguish” (2018), 255 Iron chain, 92 x 63 x 67 (h) cm

"Anguish" (detail) (2018), 303 Stainless chain, 58 x 95 x 87 (h) cm

“Anguish” (detail) (2018), 303 Stainless chain, 58 x 95 x 87 (h) cm

"Meditation" (2018), 626 Stainless chain, 135 x 120 x 200 (h) cm

“Meditation” (2018), 626 Stainless chain, 135 x 120 x 200 (h) cm

"Nirvana" (2018), 180 Stainless chain, 48 x 97 x 92 (h) cm

“Nirvana” (2018), 180 Stainless chain, 48 x 97 x 92 (h) cm

"Nirvana" (detail) (2018), 180 Stainless chain, 48 x 97 x 92 (h) cm

“Nirvana” (detail) (2018), 180 Stainless chain, 48 x 97 x 92 (h) cm

"Meditation" (2018), 187 Iron chain, 84 x 50 x 110 (h) cm

“Meditation” (2018), 187 Iron chain, 84 x 50 x 110 (h) cm

 

 



Art

Textile Bodies Reveal Branched Systems of Veins, Flowers and Roots by Raija Jokinen

February 26, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Finnish artist Raija Jokinen creates sculptural bodies out of flax which attempt to reveal the complicated relationship between the mind and body. Webs of flowers, veins, and roots cover her textile torsos, shape-shifting between plant and human forms. Jokinen invites the audience to get lost in these visual similarities, as she makes no distinction between whether the pieces are actually nerves or sprouting tree branches.

“It is fascinating how body-related details, such as skin, blood vessels, and nerve tracks resemble the forms of roots or branches, as well as many other organic things,” Jokinen told Colossal. “I am excited in their apparent similarity, infinite variation, and how these visual allegories can be found almost everywhere. These forms are optimal for the life-support functions, and maybe also for our mind.”

Jokinen compares her sculptural practice to painting, using handmade flax rather than paint. An upcoming solo exhibition of her fibrous sculptures opens March 14 at Galleria Uusi Kipinä and runs through April 8. You can see more of her body-based works on her website.

 

 



Art

Paper-Cast Sculptures of Legs and Torsos Covered in Traditional Chinese Paintings by Peng Wei

January 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Beijing-based artist Peng Wei places traditional Chinese painting on rice paper to create contemporary sculptures of human legs, shoes, and torsos. These paper-cast works display scenes of the natural and domestic, including lush gardens, animals, and interiors of Chinese homes. Peng has been troubled by the adoption of Western styles of clothing by Chinese women. By painting classical Chinese motifs on Western shoes and other fashion-related items, Peng aims to deny the decline of China’s cultural heritage to rapid globalization.

Peg was born in Chengdu in 1974 and graduated from the Eastern art department of Nankai University with a BA in Literature and an MA in Philosophy. Her works have been collected by the National Art Museum of China, the Hong Kong Museum of Art, the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, the Guangdong Art Museum, and many more international collections. You can see more of Peng’s paintings and sculptures on Artsy. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art Photography

Landscapes Formed From Human Bodies by Carl Warner

July 30, 2013

Christopher Jobson

carl-4

Shin Knee Valley

carl-1

Valley of the Reclining Woman

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The Desert of Sleeping Men

carl-3

Desert of Backs

carl-5

Shoulder Hill Valley

carl-6

Headless Horizon

In this series of photographs by Carl Warner, human bodies have been contorted, lit, and manipulated to form expansive landscapes reminiscent of barren deserts and mountains. The London-based photographer who might be best known for his Foodscapes, says that he shoots all of the forms in his studio to focus attention on “one person’s body, creating a sense of place so that a body that is lived in becomes a place to live.” The images are then digitally pieced together using Photoshop. If you liked this also check out the work of Arno Rafael Minkkinen and of course Spencer Tunick (nsfw). (via PetaPixel)