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Art

Ghostly Figures Occupy Sculptures of Architectural Ruin by Diana Al-Hadid

July 26, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

“Nolli’s Orders” (2012), Steel, polymer gypsum, fiberglass, wood, foam, paint, 156 x 264 x 228 inches, all images via Marianne Boesky Gallery

Diana Al-Hadid creates large-scale sculptures and installations that merge bodily forms with collapsing altars, columns, and other architectural forms. Headless bronze figures in repose appear to drip down concrete blocks, while organs surround fictional players like beautiful beasts. In each, the Syran-American artist references archaeological remains, creating ghostly figures that reference the ruins from societies past. In addition to traditional sculptural media like bronze, steel, and concrete, the artist also incorporates more experimental materials like beeswax, fiberglass, and foam. “For me to get a sculpture to lift off the floor…that’s the first way to rebel,” Al-Hadid explained about her gravity-defying work in an Art21 interview.

The Brooklyn-based artist has concurrent Nashville-based exhibitions at both the Frist Art Museum until September 2, 2019 and Cheekwood Estate&Gardens. You can see more of Al-Hadid’s sculptural work on her website and Instagram. (via Hi-Fructose)

“Synonym” (2016), Polymer modified gypsum, fiberglass, powder coated aluminum, pigment, 83 x 60 x 60 inches, Edition of 5, with 1 AP

“Suspended After Image” (2012), Wood, steel, polymer gypsum, fiberglass, high density foam, plaster, paint, 126 x 282 x 204 inches

Detail of “Synonym” (2016), Polymer modified gypsum, fiberglass, powder coated aluminum, pigment, 83 x 60 x 60 inches, Edition of 5, with 1 AP

Detail of “Antonym” (2012), Steel, polymer gypsum, fiberglass, wood, foam, paint, 68 x 63 x 54 inches

Detail of “In Mortal Repose” (2011), Bronze and concrete, 72 x 71 x 63 1/4 inches

Installation view of “Falcon’s Fortress” at Boesky Gallery, (2017), Photography Credit: Object Studies

Detail of “A Measure of Ariadne’s Love” (2007), Mixed media 84 x 108 x 96 inches

“A Measure of Ariadne’s Love” (2007), Mixed media, 84 x 108 x 96 inches

Installation view of “Phantom Limb,” NYU Abu Dhabi Art Gallery, 2016

 

 



Design

Sanded Down Versions of Mass-Produced Chairs Speak to an Economy in Crisis

July 18, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Dutch designer Frank Tjepkema of Studio Tjep created the Recession Chair in 2011 as a response to the world’s economic crisis. To produce the work, Studio Tjep sanded down a mass-produced IKEA chair to a ragged and skeletal structure. “The resulting object is barely functional as it most likely won’t withstand the weight of the person it is trying to support,” said Tjep in a statement about the chair, “much like a society plagued by recession.”

As an opposing gesture, Tjep cast the work in bronze, adding strength to the chair’s areas of fault. You can see various states of the chair in the images below, including a partially sanded version of the chair in white, and several examples of the piece fully cast in luminous bronze. To view more examples of Tjep’s work with architecture, objects, and interior design, visit their website. (via @designers_need)

 

 



Art

Pensive Faces Peer Out From the Pages of Bronze Book Sculptures by Paola Grizi

February 11, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Italian sculptor Paola Grizi creates bronze sculptures of faces emerging from the tousled pages of books, often with an exposed hand that appears to gently push aside the pages. Some of the pieces are sculpted as traditional novels, while others are more abstract— bronze pieces of paper folded and stacked in cube-like formations. The enduring metal works are meant honor the physicality of printed materials, resources which are quickly being lost due to the ease and immediacy of technological devices. You can see more of Grizi’s literary sculptures on Instagram.  (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Art Design Science

Biochemistry Professor Transforms His Research into Bronze Recreations of Ancient Trilobites and Modern Insects

December 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

D. Allan Drummond (previously) is an associate professor of biochemistry, molecular biology, and human genetics at the University of Chicago. A few years ago Drummond began turning his extensive research of fossils and prehistoric sea creatures into detailed computer renderings which he then 3D prints and casts in bronze. Although many of his sculptures are inspired by ancient creatures like the trilobite, which existed for over 270 million years before its extinction 250 years ago, he also creates modern-day insects such as praying mantises and large bug-eyed jumping spiders.

Drummond currently has a solo exhibition titled “Curiosity” at Roq La Rue Gallery in Seattle through January 6th, 2019. In addition to several large individual sculptures, the show features a grid of wall-mounted trilobites that pay homage to the work of the 19th-century illustrator and naturalist Ernst Haeckel. Visitors are encouraged to remove the bronze pieces to explore the underside in greater detail—a part of the creature which is often eroded in fossils over time. You can see more of Drummond’s metal recreations of animals past and present on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Twisting Bronze Figural Sculptures by Isabel Miramontes

April 28, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Image via Casart

Image via Casart

Spanish sculptor Isabel Miramontes creates figural bronze sculptures that bring a visual movement to ordinary silhouettes. Her works provide unusual shapes within the body of her subjects, opening up torsos to reveal elongated spirals and horizontal bars that seem to reveal an inner turmoil. Often the faces of her sculptures have blank or passive expressions, unknowing participants to the tangle of bronze which twists below. Miramontes is represented by Canfin Gallery in New York and Lucy B Campbell Gallery in London. You can also see more of her work at Galerie De Medicis.

Image via Casart

 

 



Art

A Statue of a Defiant Girl Now Confronts the Famous ‘Charging Bull’ on Wall St.

March 8, 2017

Christopher Jobson

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If you happen to walk by the famous bronze Charging Bull statue in New York’s financial district today you’ll discover a fantastic new addition: a small girl in a defiant and unflinching pose now stands just feet away from the tip of the wild bull’s horns. The bronze sculpture was installed on Tuesday morning as part of a joint effort between State Street Global Advisors (a $2.5 trillion asset manager) and city officials just ahead of International Women’s Day. The artwork is part of a campaign to pressure companies to add more women to their boards, but will surely speak more broadly as symbol of women’s rights and empowerment within society as a whole.

Lori Heinel, the deputy global chief investment officer at State Street shares with Business Insider:

“One of the most iconic images on Wall Street is the charging bull. So the idea of having a female sort of stand against the bull or stand up to the bull just struck us as a very clever but also creative and engaging way to make that statement. Even though it’s a little girl, her stance is one of determination, forwardness, and being willing to challenge and take on the status quo.”

The statue, officially titled The Fearless Girl, was created by Delaware-based bronze sculptor Kristen Visbal and will remain for at least a month. The piece is already drawing large crowds and extensive coverage in the press. Charging Bull was originally an act of guerrilla art by Arturo Di Modica, and only became permanent after its soaring popularity, leaving some to wonder if Visbal’s statue could follow the same story. You can watch a video about its creation below.

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Art

Bisected Boulders With Stretched Bronze Interiors by Romain Langlois

June 17, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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RomainLanglois_03

A self-taught sculptor, Romain Langlois studied medical books and anatomical charts to understand the human body, building his first sculptures using only plaster and clay. Seeking a more permanent material, Langlois turned to bronze, a metal he now incorporates into works that are inspired by nature rather than man. His pieces visually pull apart the natural objects that surround us—building works that appear as bisected rocks, boulders, and tree trunks. These sculptures showcase glistening bronze protruding from their insides, unleashing the perceived inner energy of each object.

Langlois is based in La Côte Martin, France. You can see more of his sculptures on Artistics or on his website. (via Juxtapoz)

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