cameras

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Art Photography

Vintage Cameras Dissected With a Saw and Suspended in Resin by Fabian Oefner

August 25, 2019

Andrew LaSane

For his latest series titled “CutUp,” artist Fabian Oefner (previously) used a band saw to slice film and still cameras into pieces, revealing their beautiful and complex inner workings. The pieces were rearranged, reassembled, and suspended in resin in interesting configurations. Each new sculpture transforms the tools for making art into new works of art designed to be viewed from multiple angles.

Explaining the production process, Oefner said in a statement that he uses a “unique mix of high-end and low-end technologies.” Resin is poured around the cameras to prepare the objects for cutting. Oefner’s preferred method for curing the resin around the cameras involves vacuum and pressure chambers that are capable of reaching precise temperatures and atmospheric pressures. The blocks are then dissected using an old band saw before being hand-polished and rearranged. The new forms are encapsulated in resin and polished again to reveal every detail.

For a video of the creation process scroll down, and for more exploded views of cameras and other objects, follow Fabian Oefner on Instagram.

 

 



Art Design Photography

Everyday Objects Manually Transformed Into Functional Film Cameras

June 6, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

It’s not uncommon to see, in any situation from a museum to a public park to see both amateur and professional photographers capturing moments using technology ranging from sleek smartphones to cumbersome lenses. Less common is the sight of a photographer shooting with a loaf of bread, mannequin, or shed.

U.K.-based artist Brendan Barry painstakingly transforms these banal materials into film cameras, which result in surprisingly beautiful photographs. Barry explores a variety of camera styles including pinhole, 35mm, and ultra large format. In a statement on his website, the artist explains that he uses “the mechanics of photography as a tool for exploration and collaboration,” often traveling to work with different communities and particularly with young people. Barry is the founder and director of Positive Light Projects, a non-profit that works with diverse audiences and emerging photographers to help empower their practice. He also teaches at the Exeter School of Art.

You can see more of Barry’s work on his website, where he documents the process of building his cameras. The artist also shares many of the resulting photographs from his collaborative cameras on Instagram.

 

 



Design

A Paper Camera Comprised of Complementary Colors Includes Interchangeable Lenses and a Removable Flash

April 11, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Seoul-based design studio DOTMOT has constructed a faux camera composed of a graphic array of blue and orange paper. The model might not be able to capture images, but the sturdy imitation has a few of the same basic functions of an operational camera, including interchangeable wide angle and telephoto lenses and a detachable flash. Take a look behind the scenes of the camera’s construction in the video below, and learn more about the creative studio’s other projects on their website and Instagram.

 

 



Art Design

Mechanations: Historical Machines Exploded into Individual Components in Sculptures by John A. Peralta

October 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Singer is Sewing Made Easy II" (2018), Singer Sewing Machine (c. 1910), wood, steel, latex, steel & fluorocarbon mono-filament, LED lighting, 42 x 30 x 18 in, all images © John Peralta

“Singer is Sewing Made Easy II” (2018), Singer Sewing Machine (c. 1910), wood, steel, latex, steel & fluorocarbon mono-filament, LED lighting, 42 x 30 x 18 in, all images © Dave DeGendt

Artist John Peralta creates sculptural odes to some of our most historic innovations by organizing and suspending components of sewing machines, typewriters, and old film projectors. In his “Mechanations,” Peralta hangs each screw, wheel, and lightbulb side-by-side in specially created lightboxes, creating three-dimensional diagrams which illuminate the inner workings of each machine.

The sculptures break down the mechanics of the 20th-century devices, presenting a unique peek into the simplicity of objects before the Digital Revolution. Peralta dissects iconic machines in areas such as design, communication, and entertainment. This technique, which he has used for over a decade, was inspired by seeing a similar sculptural diagram on the back of a Chinese magazine in 2005.  “I was inspired by its fragile beauty, and imagined a three-dimensional version with a real object,” Peralta outlines on his website. “Using only a ruler and simple tools, which I still use today, I developed techniques for suspension which expose the inner workings of these humble mechanical objects.”

The artist’s work will be included in a presentation by New York and Los Angeles-based gallery George Billis at the upcoming SOFA fair from November 1-4, 2018 at Chicago’s Navy Pier. Peralta also has a solo show at Billis’ New York location, which runs from December 11, 2018 to January 12, 2019.  You can see more of Peralta’s work on his website and Instagram.

"Singer is Sewing Made Easy II" (detail) (2018)

“Singer is Sewing Made Easy II” (detail) (2018)

"Singer is Sewing Made Easy II" (detail) (2018)

“Singer is Sewing Made Easy II” (detail) (2018)

"Blickensderfer No. 8" (2018), Blickensderfer No. 8 Typewriter (c. 1908-1910), wood, steel, steel & fluorocarbon mono-filaments, 40 x 40 x 12 in

“Blickensderfer No. 8” (2018), Blickensderfer No. 8 Typewriter (c. 1908-1910), wood, steel, steel & fluorocarbon mono-filaments, 40 x 40 x 12 in

"Blickensderfer No. 8" (detail) (2018)

“Blickensderfer No. 8” (detail) (2018)

"The Big Day" (2017), Polaroid Land Camera Model 150 (c. 1957), aluminum, wood, acrylic, fluorocarbon mono-filament, 30 x 20.5 x 13 in

“The Big Day” (2017), Polaroid Land Camera Model 150 (c. 1957), aluminum, wood, acrylic, fluorocarbon mono-filament, 30 x 20.5 x 13 in

"The Big Day" (detail) (2017)

“The Big Day” (detail) (2017)

"Keystone K109" (2018), Keystone Regal 8mm Silent Film Projector Model K-109 (c. 1953), wood, latex, steel & fluorocarbon mono-filament, LED lighting, 42 x 30 x 18 in

“Keystone K109” (2018), Keystone Regal 8mm Silent Film Projector Model K-109 (c. 1953), wood, latex, steel & fluorocarbon mono-filament, LED lighting, 42 x 30 x 18 in

"The Big Day" (detail) (2017)

“Keystone K109” (detail) (2018)

"The Big Day" (detail) (2017)

“The Big Day” (detail) (2017)

 

 



Art

Recent Surveillance Camera and Satellite Dish ‘Nests’ by Jakub Geltner

August 15, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Czech artist Jakub Geltner (previously) has been clustering groups of technological equipment in public spaces since 2011, creating installations that address the heightened state of surveillance in our contemporary world. Arranged as ‘nests,’ the sculptures interrupt both natural landscape and urban environments, making the viewer innately aware of how closely they are being watched.

One of Geltner’s latest installations is Nest 06, is a group of cameras installed alongside a pathway leading to the beach in Sydney, Australia created for Sculpture by the Sea. Attached to a curved pole, the devices stare directly down at any passersby with over a dozen watchful eyes. Nest 7, another recent work, dots the side of an aging brick building at Chateau Třebešice, bringing surveillance to the countryside rather than a bustling urban setting.

 

 



Craft Design Photography

Vintage Film Cameras Meticulously Built From Colored Paper by Lee Ji-Hee

July 26, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Korean artist Lee Ji-hee builds paper models of old film cameras, recreating the details of their every mechanism through expertly folded paper. Although his paper cameras match the original in every aspect of their form, the colors he selects for his designs are much different. Instead of matching the black, brown, and grey color schemes consistent with the 1952 Leica IIIf Red Dial or 1938 Super Kodak Six-20, Lee chooses flashy colors and patterns that give each device an updated aesthetic. You can see more of Lee’s folded paper designs (including paper hamburgers, pizza, and chicken nuggets) on the artist’s Behance and Instagram.

 

 



Art Design Photography

A Homemade Multipoint Pinhole Camera Made from 32,000 Drinking Straws

February 22, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Using 32,000 black drinking straws, collaborators Michael (Mick) Farrell and Cliff Haynes created the Straw Camera, a homemade camera they began experimenting with in 2007. Despite the connection one might draw to a pinhole camera, the Straw Camera actually functions quite differently, producing a multipoint perspective from an array rather than a single point perspective.

The direct analogue process records the light collected from each straw onto a piece of paper secured to the back of the camera. The camera gives a direct 1:1 view of the subject that is placed before it, however it translates the image to one that mirrors that of pointillist painting, breaking the subject into thousands of little dots.

“In a world beset by selfies with their immediate gratification, and HD television in all its glory feeding our visual appetite, a Straw Camera image of an individual, with its engineering projection and disappearance of the subject into the near fog of visual capture, gives the viewer a glimpse of just how transitory perception is,” said Cliff about the camera.

To read more about the project, check out the photography duo’s website for the Straw Camera, or their book which was published earlier this month. (via PetaPixel)