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Art

Everyday Objects Are Sliced and Re-Assembled into Distorted Sculptures by Fabian Oefner

April 16, 2021

Grace Ebert

“Heisenberg Object V – Cortez” (2021), leather, foam, and resin, 30 x 18 x 15 centimeters. All images © Fabian Oefner, shared with permission

In Heisenberg Objects, Fabian Oefner (previously) translates quantum mechanic’s uncertainty principle into a sculptural series of segmented objects. The Connecticut-based artist uses resin to solidify the everyday items, which include sneakers, a Leica M6, a tape recorder, a Seiko clock, and flight recorder, before slicing them into countless individual pieces. He then aggregates those fragmented parts into dissected sculptures that resemble the original object through a distorted view of the inner and outer mechanisms.

Drawing its name from German physicist Werner Heisenberg, the series is rooted in the basics of the uncertainty principle, which states that no two particles can be measured accurately at exactly the same time. “You can either determine one parameter and ignore the other or vice versa, but you can never know everything at once,” the artist writes about Heisenberg’s idea. The two opposing views—i.e. the inner and outer layers of the common items—converge in Oefner’s sculptures and visualize the principle through skewed perceptions. “As an observer, you are never able to observe the object as a whole and its inner workings simultaneously. The more accurately we see one view, the less clearly we see the other,” he says.

Check out Oefner’s Instagram for more views of the re-interpreted objects, along with videos documenting the slicing process.

 

“Heisenberg Object III – Leica M6” (2021), aluminum, glass, and resin, 20 x 15 x 5 centimeters

“Heisenberg Object I – Seiko Clock” (2021), plastics, metal, and resin, 20 x 15 x 10 centimeters

“Heisenberg Object II – Tape Recorder” (2021), plastics, metal, resin, 30 x 20 x 8 centimeters

“Heisenberg Object VI – Cortez” (2021), leather, foam, and resin, 30 x 18 x 15 centimeters

“Heisenberg Object VI – Cortez” (2021), leather, foam, and resin, 30 x 18 x 15 centimeters

Detail of “Heisenberg Object IV – Flight Recorder” (2021), plastics, metal, resin, 50 x 50 x 40 centimeters

“Heisenberg Object IV – Flight Recorder” (2021), plastics, metal, resin, 50 x 50 x 40 centimeters

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Fabian Oefner (@fabianoefner)

 

 



Art Design

Kinetic Artwork Attempts to Get a 'Little Piece of Privacy' with Mechanized Curtain

February 27, 2020

Grace Ebert

Berlin-based artist Niklas Roy isn’t just concerned about his privacy and protection online. To stop passersby from peeping into his workshop, he strung up a white, lace curtain stretching only partially across his window. Titled “My Little Piece of Privacy,” the ironic project from 2010 was established to offer seclusion to the artist, while recording those who walked past his space. Each outside movement triggers a motor to position the thin fabric in front of the person attempting to look inside. The resulting footage shows various strategies people use⁠—think rapid arm waving and hopping from one spot to another⁠—to try to trick the mechanism tracking their positions. They never succeed for more than a second, though. You can find more of Roy’s projects interested in humor and technology on YouTube.

 

 



Art Photography

Vintage Cameras Dissected With a Saw and Suspended in Resin by Fabian Oefner

August 25, 2019

Andrew LaSane

For his latest series titled “CutUp,” artist Fabian Oefner (previously) used a band saw to slice film and still cameras into pieces, revealing their beautiful and complex inner workings. The pieces were rearranged, reassembled, and suspended in resin in interesting configurations. Each new sculpture transforms the tools for making art into new works of art designed to be viewed from multiple angles.

Explaining the production process, Oefner said in a statement that he uses a “unique mix of high-end and low-end technologies.” Resin is poured around the cameras to prepare the objects for cutting. Oefner’s preferred method for curing the resin around the cameras involves vacuum and pressure chambers that are capable of reaching precise temperatures and atmospheric pressures. The blocks are then dissected using an old band saw before being hand-polished and rearranged. The new forms are encapsulated in resin and polished again to reveal every detail.

For a video of the creation process scroll down, and for more exploded views of cameras and other objects, follow Fabian Oefner on Instagram.

 

 



Art Design Photography

Everyday Objects Manually Transformed Into Functional Film Cameras

June 6, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

It’s not uncommon to see, in any situation from a museum to a public park to see both amateur and professional photographers capturing moments using technology ranging from sleek smartphones to cumbersome lenses. Less common is the sight of a photographer shooting with a loaf of bread, mannequin, or shed.

U.K.-based artist Brendan Barry painstakingly transforms these banal materials into film cameras, which result in surprisingly beautiful photographs. Barry explores a variety of camera styles including pinhole, 35mm, and ultra large format. In a statement on his website, the artist explains that he uses “the mechanics of photography as a tool for exploration and collaboration,” often traveling to work with different communities and particularly with young people. Barry is the founder and director of Positive Light Projects, a non-profit that works with diverse audiences and emerging photographers to help empower their practice. He also teaches at the Exeter School of Art.

You can see more of Barry’s work on his website, where he documents the process of building his cameras. The artist also shares many of the resulting photographs from his collaborative cameras on Instagram.

 

 



Design

A Paper Camera Comprised of Complementary Colors Includes Interchangeable Lenses and a Removable Flash

April 11, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Seoul-based design studio DOTMOT has constructed a faux camera composed of a graphic array of blue and orange paper. The model might not be able to capture images, but the sturdy imitation has a few of the same basic functions of an operational camera, including interchangeable wide angle and telephoto lenses and a detachable flash. Take a look behind the scenes of the camera’s construction in the video below, and learn more about the creative studio’s other projects on their website and Instagram.

 

 



Art Design

Mechanations: Historical Machines Exploded into Individual Components in Sculptures by John A. Peralta

October 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Singer is Sewing Made Easy II" (2018), Singer Sewing Machine (c. 1910), wood, steel, latex, steel & fluorocarbon mono-filament, LED lighting, 42 x 30 x 18 in, all images © John Peralta

“Singer is Sewing Made Easy II” (2018), Singer Sewing Machine (c. 1910), wood, steel, latex, steel & fluorocarbon mono-filament, LED lighting, 42 x 30 x 18 in, all images © Dave DeGendt

Artist John Peralta creates sculptural odes to some of our most historic innovations by organizing and suspending components of sewing machines, typewriters, and old film projectors. In his “Mechanations,” Peralta hangs each screw, wheel, and lightbulb side-by-side in specially created lightboxes, creating three-dimensional diagrams which illuminate the inner workings of each machine.

The sculptures break down the mechanics of the 20th-century devices, presenting a unique peek into the simplicity of objects before the Digital Revolution. Peralta dissects iconic machines in areas such as design, communication, and entertainment. This technique, which he has used for over a decade, was inspired by seeing a similar sculptural diagram on the back of a Chinese magazine in 2005.  “I was inspired by its fragile beauty, and imagined a three-dimensional version with a real object,” Peralta outlines on his website. “Using only a ruler and simple tools, which I still use today, I developed techniques for suspension which expose the inner workings of these humble mechanical objects.”

The artist’s work will be included in a presentation by New York and Los Angeles-based gallery George Billis at the upcoming SOFA fair from November 1-4, 2018 at Chicago’s Navy Pier. Peralta also has a solo show at Billis’ New York location, which runs from December 11, 2018 to January 12, 2019.  You can see more of Peralta’s work on his website and Instagram.

"Singer is Sewing Made Easy II" (detail) (2018)

“Singer is Sewing Made Easy II” (detail) (2018)

"Singer is Sewing Made Easy II" (detail) (2018)

“Singer is Sewing Made Easy II” (detail) (2018)

"Blickensderfer No. 8" (2018), Blickensderfer No. 8 Typewriter (c. 1908-1910), wood, steel, steel & fluorocarbon mono-filaments, 40 x 40 x 12 in

“Blickensderfer No. 8” (2018), Blickensderfer No. 8 Typewriter (c. 1908-1910), wood, steel, steel & fluorocarbon mono-filaments, 40 x 40 x 12 in

"Blickensderfer No. 8" (detail) (2018)

“Blickensderfer No. 8” (detail) (2018)

"The Big Day" (2017), Polaroid Land Camera Model 150 (c. 1957), aluminum, wood, acrylic, fluorocarbon mono-filament, 30 x 20.5 x 13 in

“The Big Day” (2017), Polaroid Land Camera Model 150 (c. 1957), aluminum, wood, acrylic, fluorocarbon mono-filament, 30 x 20.5 x 13 in

"The Big Day" (detail) (2017)

“The Big Day” (detail) (2017)

"Keystone K109" (2018), Keystone Regal 8mm Silent Film Projector Model K-109 (c. 1953), wood, latex, steel & fluorocarbon mono-filament, LED lighting, 42 x 30 x 18 in

“Keystone K109” (2018), Keystone Regal 8mm Silent Film Projector Model K-109 (c. 1953), wood, latex, steel & fluorocarbon mono-filament, LED lighting, 42 x 30 x 18 in

"The Big Day" (detail) (2017)

“Keystone K109” (detail) (2018)

"The Big Day" (detail) (2017)

“The Big Day” (detail) (2017)