churches

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Design

Two Recycled Woods are Engineered into a Modest, Airy Church in Indonesia

June 10, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © TSDS, by Mario Wibowo

Constructed entirely with locally sourced wood waste, “Oikumene Church” erected in Sajau, East Kalimantan, Indonesia, is designed to conform to its natural environment. The unassuming project features a slatted facade made of Rimba, or teak, while the inner structure utilizes meranti. An open-air hallway wraps around the perimeter of the building that’s situated at the highest elevation in the region.

For the worship space, TSDS Interior Architects relied on the Dayak people’s “Rumah Betang” design concept, which is an elongated, single-room dwelling that must have entryways on the east and west sides. Varying roof heights improve airflow throughout the interior, allowing it to stay cool throughout the day when temperatures hover around 90 degrees Fahrenheit with more than 85 percent humidity.

See more of TSDS’s environmentally thoughtful architecture on Instagram. (via designboom)

 

 

 



Design

Corrugated Steel Shelves Line a Church-Turned-Poetry-Shop in Shanghai

May 12, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Wutopia Lab

Peer inside Shanghai’s St. Nicholas, an Orthodox church from 1932, and you won’t see pews or traditional iconography. Thanks to architectural firm Wutopia Lab, the renovated building now serves as a shrine to verse. Titled “Church in Church,” the 388 square-meter structure holds Sinan Books Poetry Store, which boasts more than 1,000 volumes written in multiple languages. They’re displayed on steel shelves weighing 45 tons that contrast the ornate facades, high archways, and ceiling-bound frescoes of the original architecture.

In a conversation with ArchDaily, Wutopia Lab said the Chinese city’s mandates to preserve historical features restricted the project. The result is a light-filled space for Shanghai’s poetry community.

It should have an independent spirituality and should not be based on the religion of the old site. Given the fact that the dome could not be transformed, I used bookshelf to create a new structure as a Church in the old building Church. This is ‘Church in Church,’ a sanctuary for modern people was born in where once a sanctuary of faith.

For shoppers who need a snack after browsing, there are two cafes on the east and west sides of the building. For more of Wutopia Lab’s poetic designs, head to Instagram. You also might like these similarly transformed bookstores in the Netherlands and Buenos Aires. (via Trendland)

 

 

 



Design

Sunlight Streams into a Windowless Church Made of Wooden Slats in Japan

April 20, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Taira Nishizawa

The understated inside of a church in Shizuoka, Japan, lacks the traditional iconography and ornate trimmings often found in similar spaces. Designed by Tokyo-based architect Taira Nishizawa, Sunpu Church is a windowless building made mostly of slatted pine. The open roof allows sunlight to fill the space and cast moving shadows depending on the time of day. It also creates a direct view upward to the sky.

Because the modest building is located next to a busy railway, Nishizawa soundproofed the outer walls to ensure a quiet space for worshipers. In an interview with Arch Eyes, he spoke about his conceptualization process.

The Church Sun-Pu required specific spatial qualities. Just thinking functionally about a church, it’s not much different from a classroom. But the space must feel very different, so I needed a strategy to control that environment directly…I manipulated the performance of the external walls and roof to control the light and sound conditions, which are what distinguishes a church from a normal classroom or meeting place.

Despite its singular cross and intricate entrance panel, the red cedar facade is similarly stark and has turned gray since it was built in 2008. Follow what Nishizawa’s up to on Twitter, and check out the book chronicling his wooden projects. (via Jeroen Apers)

 

 



Design History Photography

Sacred Spaces: The Grand Interiors of Modern Churches Across Europe and Japan by Thibaud Poirier

May 7, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Kirche am Hohenzollernplatz, Berlin, Germany - Johann Freidrich Höger, 1933, all images via Thibaud Poirier

Kirche am Hohenzollernplatz, Berlin, Germany – Johann Freidrich Höger, 1933, all images via Thibaud Poirier

Thibaud Poirier (previously) travels the world photographing the architectural spaces that surround us as we live, sleep, study, and pray. In his most recent series, the French photographer captured the interiors of 29 modern churches across Germany, The Netherlands, France, Denmark, and Japan to see how each city has designed structures of worship within the last century. In Sacred Spaces, Poirier uses the same focal point in each image. The stylistic choice makes it easier to compare the similarities of basic structures such as seating and pulpit placement, while contrasting the differences in interior design choices such as lighting and color palettes. You can see more modern churches from the series on his website, Instagram, and Behance.

Saint Moritz, Augsburg, Germany - John Pawson, 2013

Saint Moritz, Augsburg, Germany – John Pawson, 2013

Resurrection of Christ, Köln, Germany - Gottfried Böhm, 1957

Resurrection of Christ, Köln, Germany – Gottfried Böhm, 1957

Grundtvigs Kirke, Copenhagen, Denmark - Peder Vilhelm Jensen-Klint, 1927

Grundtvigs Kirke, Copenhagen, Denmark – Peder Vilhelm Jensen-Klint, 1927

Opstandingskerk, Amsterdam - Marius Duintjer, 1956

Opstandingskerk, Amsterdam – Marius Duintjer, 1956

Kapelle, Berlin, Germany - Axel Schultes and Charlotte Frank, 1999

Kapelle, Berlin, Germany – Axel Schultes and Charlotte Frank, 1999

Saint Joseph, Le Havre, France - Auguste Perret, 1956

Saint Joseph, Le Havre, France – Auguste Perret, 1956

Saint Anselm's Meguro, Tokyo, Japan - Antonin Raymond, 1954

Saint Anselm’s Meguro, Tokyo, Japan – Antonin Raymond, 1954

Notre dame du Chêne, Viroflay, France - Louis, Luc and Thierry Sainsaulieu, 1966

Notre dame du Chêne, Viroflay, France – Louis, Luc and Thierry Sainsaulieu, 1966

Saint Mary's Cathedral, Tokyo, Japan - Kenzo Tange, 1964

Saint Mary’s Cathedral, Tokyo, Japan – Kenzo Tange, 1964

 

 



Photography

Panoramic Photographs by Peter Li Bring an Otherworldly Perspective to the Architectural Symmetry of Churches

January 3, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"Cocoon," all images courtesy of Peter Li

“Cocoon,” all images courtesy of Peter Li

Photographer Peter Li uses panoramic photography to introduce a new perspective to the already breathtaking architecture of churches from around the world. By capturing the entirety of the ceiling and supporting columns, Li allows the viewer to get the chance to feel what it is like to stand at the center of these grand buildings, while also achieving a viewpoint that is impossible to get without digital intervention.

One of the many stand-out aspects of the photographs is the symmetry that is highlighted when a chapel’s interior is stretched. This element, Li tells Colossal, is what gives the composition its overall balance. Lighting factors and the season are also a key parts that make a panorama more compelling to shoot. Shapes and shadows appear differently in each space depending on where the sun might be overhead, and when in a certain position, this can be quite disruptive to the photograph.

When all elements fall into place however, Lee achieves photographs that are truly transportive. His images not only take us to a different place in the world, but also allow us to be slightly removed from our known reality. “Observing a three-dimensional space in its entirety gives us a view/perspective beyond what the eye can see,” he explains. “It breaks us from reality, plays with our perception of shape and form and creates a sense of another world. Through my photography, I hope to impart the otherworldly nature to the viewer, encouraging them to take a momentary step out of their reality.”

Li is in the process of making his high resolution panoramas available to the public in the form of large, wall-sized prints. Keep up-to-date with these prints, and new images from the photographer, on his website and Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

"Dynasty"

“Dynasty”

"Hephaestus"

“Hephaestus”

"Confetti"

“Confetti”

Jack Frost

Jack Frost

"Hyrule"

“Hyrule”

"Crossbow"

“Crossbow”     

"St. Paul's, Dome"

“St. Paul’s, Dome”

 

 



Art

Over Fifteen Thousand Paper Kites Create a Two-Toned Cloud Inside New York's St. Cornelius Chapel

August 21, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All images by Timothy Schenck

All images by Timothy Schenck

A mass of circular black paper and bamboo kites merges with a collection of identically designed white ones inside Governors Island’s St. Cornelius Chapel in an installation titled The Eclipse. Created by artist Jacob Hashimoto (previously), the paper orbs hang from the ceiling by pieces of string to comprise a layered formation that appears like roving waves or clouds. This is the second iteration of the labor-intensive installation, which premiered at the Palazzo Flangini during the 57th Venice Biennale.

An additional large-scale work by Hashimoto titled Never Comes Tomorrow, which consists of hundred of wood cubes and colorful steel funnels, is installed outside of the chapel in Liggett Hall Archway. The dual installations can be visited on Governors Island seven days a week through October 31, 2018. You can find specific hours for the installation on the Governors Island website, and see more of Hashimoto’s works on his website. (via Fubiz)

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Sailing Ship Kite