cityscapes

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with cityscapes



Design

A Comprehensive and Colorful Map of London Outlines the City’s Great Buildings and Icons

November 1, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Designer Rafael Esquer of Alfalfa New York (previously) has added a new city print to his collection, this time focusing on the iconic buildings, neighborhoods, and residents of London. The colorful poster highlights the city’s classic landmarks such as Big Ben, the London Eye and the Buckingham Palace, and includes the many bridges that cross over the River Thames. Esquer’s London poster is available for purchase in his online store. The designer is also participating in Colossal’s upcoming exhibition Chain Reaction: Posters About Bikes at the Chicago Design Museum and in the Colossal Shop starting November 16, 2018.

 

 



Art

Multiple Perspectives Form Elaborately Detailed Cityscapes by Nathan Walsh

August 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Pier 17" (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 50 inches

“Pier 17” (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 50 inches, all images via Nathan Walsh

British artist Nathan Walsh (previously) creates oil painted cityscapes by combining reference images from a range of perspectives and angles. His latest work Catching Fire was created from a combination of photographs taken during three visits to New York City over a two year period. The painting more accurately captures the feeling of Times Square rather an exact representation, presenting multiple horizon points to make the viewer feel as if they are at the center of the neon-washed environment.

In addition to taking numerous photographs of his chosen location, Walsh also spends time sketching his surroundings in a series of thumbnail drawings. “Of late I’ve found the sketchbook to be of increasing importance even for notes on color or whatever I happen to be thinking about at the time,” he tells Colossal. “This immediate personal response to the environment plays an important role when I’m back in my studio in the United Kingdom and reliant on the photographs taken.”

Once he’s decided on the subject and scale of the painting, he draws in elements in a fairly loose and intuitive way. “Freehand drawing is fundamental to all of my work, allowing me to take full ownership of photographic material,” he explains. “Rejecting the mechanical transfer of imagery forces me to construct each object from scratch and allows for a fluid and inventive approach.”

By selecting segments from a variety of photographs of each scene, Walsh is able to construct his own reality of a space within an urban environment. This includes shifting key elements of his paintings into what he describes as different perspective “zones,” which he explains allows his works to more closely relate to how we experience a city while we are walking through it.

Over the last three years, Walsh’s paintings have begun to focus more heavily on the weather conditions present in a particular location, homing in on the reflective sidewalks produced during a rainstorm or the geometric bands of light that infiltrate an urban space during a bright, cloudless day. You can view of a selection of Walsh’s New York City paintings in his upcoming solo exhibition at Bernarducci Gallery in Manhattan, which opens September 6 and runs through September 29, 2018. More of Walsh’s cityscapes can be seen on his Instagram and Twitter.

"Catching Fire" (2017), oil on canvas, 53 x 108 inches

“Catching Fire” (2017), oil on canvas, 53 x 108 inches

Drawing for "Catching Fire" (2017), oil on canvas, 53 x 108 inches

Drawing for “Catching Fire” (2017), oil on canvas, 53 x 108 inches

"Lake Street' (2017), oil on linen, 34 x 52 inches

“Lake Street’ (2017), oil on linen, 34 x 52 inches

"ZBAR" (2016), oil on canvas, 51 x 115 inches

“ZBAR” (2016), oil on canvas, 51 x 115 inches

"Ed Koch" (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

“Ed Koch” (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

Detail of "Ed Koch" (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

Detail of “Ed Koch” (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

Detail drawing of "Ed Koch" (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

Detail drawing of “Ed Koch” (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

"Peninsula" (2017), oil on canvas, 69 x 133 inches

“Peninsula” (2017), oil on canvas, 69 x 133 inches

 

 



Art

Out-of-Focus Paintings by Philip Barlow Capture the Twinkling Lights of Cityscapes at Night

August 8, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

“Electric III,” oil on linen, 47 x 78 inches, all images via Philip Barlow

Cape Town-based artist Philip Barlow paints abstracted depictions of the cityscapes at night, blurring the focus of street lamps and headlights the way our eyes or a photographer’s lens might when adjusting to a city’s bright, multi-colored lights. In this way, Barlow paints from perception rather than reality, showcasing the beautiful ways we process our daily surroundings. In the foreground, the paintings feature overlapping orbs of white, red, and blue light, which obscure blurred buildings, cars, and signs that occupy the dimly painted background.

“The figures in the landscape serve as carriers and reflectors of the light that falls upon them,” explains Barlow. “Bathed in the luminosity, it is my hope that they would become more beautiful. To me, light is the ultimate subject because it embodies the pinnacle of all reality.”

You can view more of the South African artist’s blurred depictions of cities, beaches, and portraits, on his website. (via My Modern Met)

"Electric Wet," oil on canvas, 39 x 59 inches

“Electric Wet,” oil on canvas, 39 x 59 inches

"Glass II," oil on canvas, 47 x 70 inches

“Glass II,” oil on canvas, 47 x 70 inches 

"Glass," oil on canvas, 70 x 47 inches, and "Jingumae II," oil on canvas, 47 x 31 inches

“Glass,” oil on canvas, 70 x 47 inches, and “Jingumae II,” oil on canvas, 47 x 31 inches

"Leaving Shibuya," oil on canvas, 47 x 98 inches

“Leaving Shibuya,” oil on canvas, 47 x 98 inches

"Ultramarine," oil on canvas, 47 x 70 inches

“Ultramarine,” oil on canvas, 47 x 70 inches

"One Way," oil on canvas, 47 x 47 inches

“One Way,” oil on canvas, 47 x 47 inches

 

 



Photography

The Neon Archives: An Exploration of Hong Kong’s Fading Neon Landscape

August 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Hong Kong has long been infused with the glowing haze produced by its omnipresent neon signs and advertisements. Recently this saturated element of the city has begun to disappear as maintenance and rent costs rise and government regulation steps in. Local photographer Dennis Isip intends to preserve this aspect of his city’s history through a series titled The Neon Archives.

Started in 2017, the ongoing photography series captures this retreating feature of the city’s culture with images that preserve Hong Kong’s vivid nightlife. “Neon lights define Hong Kong’s character and without it, the city’s identity is lost,” he tells Colossal. “The Neon Archives hope is to capture each neon sign in Hong Kong before they fade away.” (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Design

Engraved Wood and Resin Tables Glow With Maps of International Cities

July 16, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Warsaw-based company Woo Design engraves aerial views of major international cities like New York, Paris, London, and Munich into wooden coffee tables left raw or filled with resin. The designs are built with three layers to give a complete view of each city, with specific segments that reveal its streets, building tops, and waterways. In several of the company’s designs the resin embedded in the table glows a bright blue or green, adding a luminous element to the table’s surface. Woo Design’s tables are currently available through their website and Etsy. You can follow along for more updated cities and designs on their Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

  

 

 



Photography

Aerial Explorations of International Cityscapes Washed in a Neon Glow by Xavier Portela

May 4, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

After a visit to Tokyo in 2014, self-taught photographer Xavier Portela became frustrated by how static and two-dimensional his images appeared. His photographs didn’t capture the emotions, acute stimulation of senses, or electric feeling one experiences while gliding through the bright lights of a foreign city with jet lag-induced insomnia. To explore this vibrancy and atmosphere Portela began to manipulate the colors in his images, amplifying their saturation to make each reflect what the brain remembered, but the original image couldn’t convey.

“When you are taking photographs on the streets you have way more than just a frame, you have variables like temperature, noise, people, smell,” Portela tells Colossal. “You have tons of details that make our senses and brain record a specific ‘scene’ of that moment. When you got home and you look at your photographs on screen, you only have a frame in two dimensions. It’s frustrating how much information you just lost… I wanted my shots to look like as if they came straight out of a manga. Vibrant and electric.”

Portela’s series Glow is an ongoing archive of urban images from his trips to Tokyo, Hong Kong, Bangkok, New York City, and more. Each photograph is edited with a wash of neon-inspired pink, blue, and purple lights. Although previous series have included photography taken on the street, more recently he has begun to produce aerial views of the sparkling cities below. You can see more images from the Belgo-Portuguese photographer and filmmaker on Instagram and Behance. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Photography

Ultraviolet Break of Day: A Midnight Walk Through the Neon-Hued Streets of Asian Cities by Marcus Wendt

August 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

While on a recent trip through Hong Kong, Shenzhen, and Seoul, London-based photographer Marcus Wendt found himself suffering from a bout of jetlag induced insomnia and ended up wandering the streets of several cities late at night. With a camera in-hand he captured these mesmerising shots that channel the cyberpunk vibe of movies like Bladerunner where narrow urban alleys are bathed in cool ultraviolet light. Over several days Wendt worked his way through the Kowloon area of Hong Kong and then Shenzhen’s Huaqiangbei area known for its sprawling electronics market, before eventually traveling to Seoul. You can see more from the project on his website. (via Colossal Submissions)

Seoul, South Korea

 

 

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