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Art

Bonsai Tree and Sea Creature Sculptures Crafted from Blown Glass by Simone Crestani

March 1, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Glass artist Simone Crestani uses borosilicate glass with a lampworking technique to create detailed glass sculptures. Each piece imitates imperfect organic forms such as twisting Japanese bonsai trees or lopsided coral. Bonsai is an ongoing theme Crestani often returns to, and views as being a base of his studio practice. “The bonsai is a concentration of life, it overcomes the barrier of size and expresses strength and energy; it is a work of art that is never finished, in which nature continues to develop and evolve,” he explains on his website. “I shape the [glass], but the end result has an identity of its own. I help it to grow, and wait until it gives me an indication of the equilibrium that will allow it to express itself.” You can see more of his glass-based designs, which also include bubbles, bugs, and unusual glasses, on Instagram. (via designboom)

 

 



Art Craft

Deadstock Rug Materials Transformed into an Immersive Coral Garden by Vanessa Barragão

January 14, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Vanessa Barragão (previously) recycles unused yarn from the textile industry to produce wall hangings and rugs that imitate the structure of coral reefs. Her recent work, Coral Garden, addresses the scale at which this massive industry pollutes the environment by forming an immersive installation created from an artisanal rug factory’s deadstock supplies. In the production of her sculptural rugs and tapestries Barragão attempts to be as ecofriendly as possible. The Portuguese artist utilizes ancestral and handmade techniques like latch hook, hand-tuft, embroidery, felt, and crochet in order to form each colorful element. Coral Garden is currently installed in the Art and Interaction section of Domotex 2019 in Hannover, Germany until January 14, 2019.

 

 



Art Craft

Embroidered and Beaded Coral Sculptures by Aude Bourgine Honor the ‘Lungs of the Oceans’ in Protective Glass

December 20, 2018

Andrew LaSane

French visual artist Aude Bourgine’s work is informed by her love of the environment and a sense of guilt for what humanity has done to the natural world. Using textiles, beads, and sequins, the artist creates displays that capture the beauty and fragility of coral for a series called “Poumons des océans,” which translates to “Lungs of the Oceans.”

Bourgine’s sculptures mimic the unique shapes, intricate textures, and vivid colors of living coral. Encased in glass bell jars, they are simultaneously isolated as objects of wonder, and also protected from harm caused by the hands of humans. “If we do not rapidly change our relationship with our environment, oceans will be dead by 2050,” the artist said in a statement on her website. “Their disappearance will entail a disastrous imbalance on all ecological, climate and human levels…We must take heed for this universal cause, which concerns each and every one of us.”

Bourgine has an upcoming solo exhibition at the Saint Julien Chapel in Le Petit-Quevilly in northern France from June 7 through 30, 2019. You can see more of Bourgine’s sculptural works of the sea on Instagram. (via The Fiber Studio)

 

 



Art

A Whirling Porcelain Coral Reef Draws Attention to the Cost of Climate Change

October 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)" (2018), Glazed stoneware + porcelain, 846 x 570 x 50 cm, image by Amanda Brooks

“Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)” (2018), Glazed stoneware + porcelain, 846 x 570 x 50 cm, photograph by Amanda Brooks

The latest installation by ceramicist and ocean advocate Courtney Mattison (previously) is Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)a porcelain coral arrangement produced for the US Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia. The site-specific work features a vibrant cluster of coral structures at its center which turn stark white the further they are placed from the installation’s core. This shifting gradient references the rapid devastation caused to reefs as temperature levels rise and force corals to lose their colorful algae.

This installation is a celebration of Indonesia’s coral reefs, while also pinpointing the human-caused damage that infects the vibrant systems. “Corals, anemones, sponges and other reef-dwelling invertebrates coalesce into a cyclone-like spiral with colorful healthy corals at the eye of the storm, their tentacles and branches dancing in the current,” explains Mattison. “Toward the edges and tail of the swirling constellation, corals sicken and bleach, exposing their sterile white skeletons—a specter of what could be lost from climate change. Yet at its heart the reef remains healthy, resilient and harmonious.”

"Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)" detail, image by Amanda Brooks

“Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)” detail, image by Amanda Brooks

Indonesia is located at the heart of what is called the “Coral Triangle” or “Amazon of the Sea.” This environment is host to more invertebrate species than can be found anywhere else on the planet, in addition to thousands of species of fish which thrive in the rich ecosystem. Mattison hopes that her handmade constructions of the Coral Triangle’s diverse specimens produces an excitement in viewers while sparking an interest to protect the delicate balance found in Indonesia’s coral systems.

"Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)" detail, image by Courtney Mattison

“Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)” detail, image by Courtney Mattison

Mattison is exhibiting another recent installation titled Afterglow (Our Changing Seas VI) in the group show Endangered Species: Artists on the Frontline of Biodiversity, curated by Barbara Matilsky, at the Whatcom Museum in Bellingham, Washington through January 6, 2019. Mattison will travel to Bali at the end of October to unveil a 60-foot-long community-based coral installation she designed for the Coral Triangle Center in Sanur, Bali titled Semesta Terumbu Karang—Coral Universe. The work features over 2000 elements sculpted by a team of over 300 volunteers, coral reef conservationists, and Balinese artisans. You can see further conservation-based projects by Mattison on her website and Instagram.

"Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)" detail, image by Courtney Mattison

“Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)” detail, image by Courtney Mattison

“Afterglow (Our Changing Seas VI)” (2018), Glazed stoneware + porcelain, 230 x 260 x 50 cm

"Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)" detail, image by Courtney Mattison

“Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)” detail, image by Courtney Mattison

"Afterglow (Our Changing Seas VI)" (detail)

“Afterglow (Our Changing Seas VI)” (detail)

"Afterglow (Our Changing Seas VI)" (detail)

“Afterglow (Our Changing Seas VI)” (detail)

"Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)" (2018)

“Confluence (Our Changing Seas V)” (2018)

 

 



Art

Rugged Multi-Color Paintings by Dylan Gebbia-Richards Mirror the Textures of Molten Rock

August 10, 2018

Anna Marks

Credit: Wes Magyar

Credit: Wes Magyar

Breathtakingly colorful textures pop out when viewers first witness Dylan Gebbia-Richards’s large-scale paintings which appear to escape from their canvas. His rugged works mirror the structure of natural forms such as molten rock or coral. “I see my works as their own landscapes,” Gebbia-Richards tells Colossal. “I allow chance, the driving force behind all natural phenomena, to sculpt the structures of my paintings.”

Gebbia-Richards gains his inspiration from the vastness of the natural world and his artworks explore aesthetics that merge between the microscopic and macroscopic. “I find the enormity of the natural world awe-inspiring,” he esplains. “Landscapes which are immense seem intimate simultaneously; counter-intuitively these large spaces create the feeling of an embrace.”

Credit: Dylan Gebbia-Richards

Credit: Thomas Meyers

Credit: Thomas Meyers

While Gebbia-Richards’ paintings vary in size, all are built to engulf the viewer. “Sometimes this is very literal like in my room-sized installations which encompass those inside,” he says. “But even with my smaller pieces, I’m looking for the work to expand outwards, attempting to generate the feeling of a place which is much larger.” Like observing a mountain range, the scale of his paintings inspire and delight, while his use of a bold color palette adds a hint of magic to each creation.

Credit: Stephen Ironside

Credit: Stephen Ironside

Credit: Dylan Gebbia-Richards

The artist’s works appear as if they have been created through a volcanic eruption. To imitate this process, he constructs his paintings by using colored pigment and droplets of melted wax. “I initially found dripping and splattering melting wax very satisfying,” says Gebbia-Richards. “I was interested in the qualities of the marks the melted wax produced, specifically the chaotic patterns of the splatters which sprung from the drip’s impact with the paper I was melting over.”

His paintings emerge by separating the dripping marks from their splatter. It is these random interactions between the various pigments, drip gestures, and the splatter which creates Gebbia-Richards’s layered textures that are signature to his practice. You can see one of the Colorado artist’s paintings at Looking For U at Unit London which runs until August 26, 2018. To view more of his work visit his website and Instagram.

Credit: Thomas Meyers

Credit: Steven Ironside

Credit: Danielle Webster

Credit: Thomas Meyers

 

 



Art

The Coralarium: An Immersive Sculptural Installation Semi-Submerged in the Indian Ocean

July 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All photographs shared with permission of the artist Jason deCaires Taylor

The Coralarium is the newest aquatic sculpture by artist Jason deCaires Taylor (previously here and here). Built in a large developed coral lagoon in the Maldives, the semi-submerged installation is positioned so both human and marine visitors can interact with sculptural elements on the skyline, inter-tidal waterline, and seabed.

To reach the Coralarium, island guests traverse about 500 feet (150 meters) of shallow water, seascaped with underwater poplars and endemic corals. About 20 feet (6 meters) tall, the open-air stainless steel cube is designed based on natural coral structures and allows tidal water and marine life to pass through. Within the structure, which provides some refuge from the ocean’s currents, are several figurative sculptures that merge human, plant, and coral shapes, based on endemic species of the island and its surrounding reefs. Additional sculptures sit and stand atop the cube’s roof to unite the interior elements with the horizon.

The aquatic destination is accessible via small group tours led by marine biologists that are on staff at the Fairmont Maldives Sirru Fen Fushi resort. You can see more of Taylor’s work on Facebook and Instagram, and the video below shows the creation of the Coralarium. (via Web Urbanist)

 

 



Art Design

Nature-Based Textiles by Vanessa Barragão Highlight Ecosystems Above and Below the Sea

December 29, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Portuguese textile artist Vanessa Barragão produces carpets and tapestries from a variety of different techniques, creating multi-faceted landscapes with the use of latch hooking, crochet, weaving, basketry, and felt. Her environmental works present imitation coral, fungi, and algae as three-dimensional elements in plush contexts such as the circular work viewed above which she calls Earth Rug. The piece was developed for this year’s Milan Design Week and spans nearly 15 feet in diameter.

You can shop Barragão’s smaller coral-decorated textiles on her Etsy Shop, and view more of her larger works on her Instagram and Behance. (via Lustik)

 

 

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