coral

Posts tagged
with coral



Art

Rugged Multi-Color Paintings by Dylan Gebbia-Richards Mirror the Textures of Molten Rock

August 10, 2018

Anna Marks

Credit: Wes Magyar

Credit: Wes Magyar

Breathtakingly colorful textures pop out when viewers first witness Dylan Gebbia-Richards’s large-scale paintings which appear to escape from their canvas. His rugged works mirror the structure of natural forms such as molten rock or coral. “I see my works as their own landscapes,” Gebbia-Richards tells Colossal. “I allow chance, the driving force behind all natural phenomena, to sculpt the structures of my paintings.”

Gebbia-Richards gains his inspiration from the vastness of the natural world and his artworks explore aesthetics that merge between the microscopic and macroscopic. “I find the enormity of the natural world awe-inspiring,” he esplains. “Landscapes which are immense seem intimate simultaneously; counter-intuitively these large spaces create the feeling of an embrace.”

Credit: Dylan Gebbia-Richards

Credit: Thomas Meyers

Credit: Thomas Meyers

While Gebbia-Richards’ paintings vary in size, all are built to engulf the viewer. “Sometimes this is very literal like in my room-sized installations which encompass those inside,” he says. “But even with my smaller pieces, I’m looking for the work to expand outwards, attempting to generate the feeling of a place which is much larger.” Like observing a mountain range, the scale of his paintings inspire and delight, while his use of a bold color palette adds a hint of magic to each creation.

Credit: Stephen Ironside

Credit: Stephen Ironside

Credit: Dylan Gebbia-Richards

The artist’s works appear as if they have been created through a volcanic eruption. To imitate this process, he constructs his paintings by using colored pigment and droplets of melted wax. “I initially found dripping and splattering melting wax very satisfying,” says Gebbia-Richards. “I was interested in the qualities of the marks the melted wax produced, specifically the chaotic patterns of the splatters which sprung from the drip’s impact with the paper I was melting over.”

His paintings emerge by separating the dripping marks from their splatter. It is these random interactions between the various pigments, drip gestures, and the splatter which creates Gebbia-Richards’s layered textures that are signature to his practice. You can see one of the Colorado artist’s paintings at Looking For U at Unit London which runs until August 26, 2018. To view more of his work visit his website and Instagram.

Credit: Thomas Meyers

Credit: Steven Ironside

Credit: Danielle Webster

Credit: Thomas Meyers

 

 



Art

The Coralarium: An Immersive Sculptural Installation Semi-Submerged in the Indian Ocean

July 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All photographs shared with permission of the artist Jason deCaires Taylor

The Coralarium is the newest aquatic sculpture by artist Jason deCaires Taylor (previously here and here). Built in a large developed coral lagoon in the Maldives, the semi-submerged installation is positioned so both human and marine visitors can interact with sculptural elements on the skyline, inter-tidal waterline, and seabed.

To reach the Coralarium, island guests traverse about 500 feet (150 meters) of shallow water, seascaped with underwater poplars and endemic corals. About 20 feet (6 meters) tall, the open-air stainless steel cube is designed based on natural coral structures and allows tidal water and marine life to pass through. Within the structure, which provides some refuge from the ocean’s currents, are several figurative sculptures that merge human, plant, and coral shapes, based on endemic species of the island and its surrounding reefs. Additional sculptures sit and stand atop the cube’s roof to unite the interior elements with the horizon.

The aquatic destination is accessible via small group tours led by marine biologists that are on staff at the Fairmont Maldives Sirru Fen Fushi resort. You can see more of Taylor’s work on Facebook and Instagram, and the video below shows the creation of the Coralarium. (via Web Urbanist)

 

 



Art Design

Nature-Based Textiles by Vanessa Barragão Highlight Ecosystems Above and Below the Sea

December 29, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Portuguese textile artist Vanessa Barragão produces carpets and tapestries from a variety of different techniques, creating multi-faceted landscapes with the use of latch hooking, crochet, weaving, basketry, and felt. Her environmental works present imitation coral, fungi, and algae as three-dimensional elements in plush contexts such as the circular work viewed above which she calls Earth Rug. The piece was developed for this year’s Milan Design Week and spans nearly 15 feet in diameter.

You can shop Barragão’s smaller coral-decorated textiles on her Etsy Shop, and view more of her larger works on her Instagram and Behance. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art

Hyperrealistic Depictions of Fish Merged With Their Coral Environments by Lisa Ericson

December 15, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

lisaericson_16_08

Artist, illustrator, and designer Lisa Ericson (previously) paints hyperrealistic images of imaginary animals, hybrids that intertwine species. Previously focused on a body of work that merged mice and butterflies, Ericson’s newest series focuses on the creatures below, painting bright fish against matte black backgrounds. The vibrant works highlight a variety of coral integrated into fins and tails of scaly animals, as well as showcasing the groups of fish that have decided to make these tails their home.

Ericson’s work is currently in a two-person exhibition titled Supernature at Antler Gallery in Portland, OR which runs through December 22. You can view more of her in-process and completed animal paintings on her Instagram and Facebook.

lisaericson_16_04

lisaericson_16_03

lisaericson_16_05

lisaericson_16_09

lisaericson_16_07

lisaericson_16_06

lisaericson_16_02

lisaericson_16_01

 

 



Art

A Translucent Figurative Sculpture Appears Camouflaged Against the Horizon of Bondi Beach

November 11, 2016

Christopher Jobson

coral-4

Recently on view as part of Sculpture by the Sea in Bondi, this unusual figurative sculpture by artist Alessandra Rossi seems to have captured the imagination of many, becoming one of the most popular pieces of this year’s exhibition. Titled Untitled (coral), Rossi says the piece depicting a solitary young girl in a dress is inspired in part by the phenomenon of coral bleaching, something that occurs in nature when ocean water becomes too warm and coral begins to expel an algae giving it a white appearance. Additionally, the work grapples with modern issues of identity, functioning “as a metaphor for the patination and discoloration of emotion engendered by the digital era.”

The sculpture’s translucent layered appearance changes dramatically when viewed from different angles during the day and at times almost vanishes against the horizon of Bondi beach. You can see more sculptures from Sculpture by the Sea 2016 here.

Alessandra Rossi, Untitled Coral. Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2016. Photo by Tony Wakeham.

Alessandra Rossi, Untitled Coral. Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2016. Photo by Tony Wakeham.

sculp-1

Alessandra Rossi, Untitled Coral. Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2016. Photo by Clyde Yee.

sculp-1-light

Alessandra Rossi, Untitled Coral. Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2016. Photo by Grace Sui.

coral-3

Photo by Brian Thomas

 

 



Photography Science

A Macro Timelapse Highlights the Micro Movements of Spectacularly Colored Coral

September 29, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

Interested in documenting one of the oldest animals on Earth, Barcelona-based production company myLapse set to capture the minimal movements of brightly colored coral, recording actions rarely seen by the human eye. The short film took nearly 25,000 individual images of the marine invertebrates to compose, and photography of species, such as the Acanthophyllia, Trachyphyllia, Heteropsammia cochlea, Physogyra, took over a year.

The production team hopes the film attracts attention to the Great Barrier Reef, encouraging watchers to take a deeper interest in one of the natural wonders of the world that is being rapidly bleached due to climate change. You can see more up-close images of the coral species featured in this film on Flickr. (via Sploid)

coralcolors_06

coralcolors_05

coralcolors_04

coralcolors_03

coralcolors_02

coralcolors_01

 

 



Art

Human Skeletons Assembled with Found Coral by Gregory Halili

June 16, 2016

Christopher Jobson

coral-1

With parched white pieces of found sea coral, artist Gregory Halili has been creating skeletal parts of the human anatomy from hands and arms all the way up to a lifesize recreation of a human skeleton suspended atop a giant piece of driftwood. The irregular coral segments are uncanny stand-ins for human bones, and it’s no surprise the artist is able to identify anatomical details within sea life due to his previous work with skulls carved from mother of pearl. Halili was born in the Philippines in 1975 and spent his childhood surrounded by tropical wildlife and abundant regional flora and fauna that would go on to influence his artistic career in New Jersey. You can see more of his recent work on Artsy and at Nancy Hoffman Gallery.

coral-2

coral-3

coral-4

coral-5

coral-6

coral-7

final

coral-8

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Beetle Puzzle