editorial

Posts tagged
with editorial



Food Photography

A Literal Translation Lends a Daring Edge to the First Meal of the Day

May 8, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Although breakfast is commonly consumed in a rush out the door, or slurped hurriedly before one dashes to catch the bus, the early morning meal’s straightforward composition of actions is often not considered. Madrid-based photographer Tessa Dóniga created the series Break/Fast after becoming intrigued by the deconstructed word’s literal translation to Spanish. Smashed cereal, a sliced bean can, and a quickly melting stick of butter all serve as subjects of the surreal photographic series, which highlight the different ways breakfast can be “broken.”

The project was first realized in collaboration with independent journal Polpettas and serves as a metaphor for how Dóniga views the world as a bilingual speaker. “The fact that I’m bilingual makes me wonder more,” she told gestalten. “When I try to translate some words into one language from another, I question myself. My challenge was to set in one image both terms in a visual composition that would be recognizable to the viewer.”

Like all of Dóniga’s uniquely styled series, Break/Fast was creating from scratch with editing in postproduction for some of her more high-flying effects such as hovering bacon or scattered eggshells. You can see more of her food styling photography on her studio’s website and on Instagram.

 

 



Animation Illustration

Paper Illustrations and GIFs Explore the Body and Mind in New Work by Eiko Ojala

March 6, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation for "Life After a hear Attack at Age 38"

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation for “Life After a hear Attack at Age 38”

New Zealand and Estonia-based illustrator Eiko Ojala (previously) creates cut paper illustrations that present shadow and depth through creative layering of colorful pieces of paper. Recently, his editorial illustrations have been focused on the mind and body, like a cut paper GIF he created for a story on heart attacks in the New York Times. Others, like two Washington Post illustrations, attempt to uncover the thoughts and feelings sequestered in children’s minds by layering images inside the shape of a boy’s profile. You can see more of Ojala’s designs on his Instagram and Behance.

Washington Post cover illustration for "Kids Special."

Washington Post cover illustration for “Kids Special.”

New York Times Sunday Review illustration for "I Did a Terrible Thing. I Needed to Apologize".

New York Times Sunday Review illustration for “I Did a Terrible Thing. I Needed to Apologize.”

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation and spot illustration for "Life After a hear Attack at Age 38"

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation and spot illustration for “Life After a hear Attack at Age 38”

 

New Yorker illustrations for "Literary Hoaxes and the Ethics of Authorship."

New Yorker illustrations for “Literary Hoaxes and the Ethics of Authorship.”

Washington Post cover illustration for "Kids Special."

Washington Post cover illustration for “Kids Special.”

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation and spot illustration for "Life After a hear Attack at Age 38"

New York Times Sunday Review cover, animation and spot illustration for “Life After a hear Attack at Age 38”

 

 



Illustration

Stark Editorial Illustrations by Stuart McReath Examine Society’s Monumental Struggles

June 18, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Stuart McReath’s high contrast illustrations employ stark shadows that lend an almost three-dimensional quality to his imagined scenes. McReath also uses dramatic juxtapositions of scale and visual metaphors like a doctor determining the “wellness” of a school with a stethoscope. Many of the works shown here were created as editorial images for articles regarding societal issues like gun laws, school testing, and the death penalty. McReath is based in Hampshire, United Kingdom and has been awarded “Best of British Illustration” by the Association of Illustrators. You can see more of his work on Behance and Instagram.

 

 



Illustration

New Paper Textured Editorial Illustrations by Eiko Ojala

October 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

With a minimalist approach to editorial work that blends silhouettes and shadows, Estonian illustrator Eiko Ojala has become a staple of major newspapers and magazines as of late including the New York Times, The Washington Post, Wired, and New Scientist. His distinctive style involves the look and feel of paper cut-outs to achieve surprising depth, both visually and conceptually, in clear statements perfect for the limited space of editorial design.
Seen here are a collection of illustrations from the last year or so, but you can see much more on Behance. (via Abduzeedo)

 

 



Illustration

Conceptual Illustrations That Unveil Hidden Worlds by Andrea Ucini

July 24, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Self-taught Italian illustrator Andrea Ucini draws scenes which reveal hidden plot lines, adding a conceptual twist to his minimalistic imagery. Within Ucini’s illustrations one can sneak a peek behind the veil of a shadow or streetlamp, uncovering another world or just a curious rodent. In addition to working as an illustrator, Ucini also composes music and plays several instruments, a pastime that he sites as a strong influence for his illustrations which have been included in Wired, Scientific America, Entrepreneur Magazine, and more. You can view more of the Denmark-based illustrator’s work on his InstagramBehance, and Anna Goodson Illustration Agency where he is currently represented.

 

 

 

 



Art Photography

Brunch Reimagined in the Style of Five Iconic Artists

June 2, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Artisan Brunch series. Image inspired by Alexander Calder. (All images via Kyle Bean)

For issue 24 of Kinfolk magazine, Designer Kyle Bean collaborated with photographer Aaron Tilley and food stylist Lucy-Ruth Hathaway to depict how famous artists might reimagine their weekend brunch spreads. The five sculptural works in the series Artisan Brunch balance pancakes and their toppings in a Alexander Calder-like mobile, suspend a halved avocado in what appears to be a Damien Hirst formaldehyde cube, and dot a patchwork of bread slices with ketchup in the style of Yayoi Kusama. The photographic series also references the artistic styles of Cornelia Parker and Salvador Dali with a flavorful twist. You can see more inventive work by the series’ collaborators on their Instagrams @kylejbean, @aaron_tilley, and @lucyruthfood, and check out a previous collaboration between Bean and Tilley in their series Anxious Anticipation.

Image inspired by Salvador Dali

Image inspired by Damien Hirst

Image inspired by Cornelia Parker

Image inspired by Yayoi Kusama

 

 



Illustration

New Surreal Illustrations From the Mind of Simon Prades

March 28, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Illustrator and graphic designer Simon Prades (previously here and here) creates illusion and intrigue through old school methods of illustration, choosing to loyally stick to pen and ink as his go-to medium. Despite choosing to clean up and sometimes color his work digitally, Prades’ physical mark making remains apparent, such as in the realistic details provided in his subjects’ faces.

The German illustrator tends to focus on select colors when creating work for clients such as The New York Times, The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, and The Atlantic, staying within a palette of bright greens and yellows, and muted blues. You can see more of Prades’ recent editorial work on his Instagram, Tumblr and Behance.

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Advanced Yoga Joes