forests

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Photography

Enchanting Photographs of a Misty English Wood by Neil Burnell

January 8, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

British photographer Neil Burnell captures striking environments void of human subjects, often traveling to remote areas far outside of civilization. His ongoing series Mystical takes a look at the fairytale-like atmosphere created by the thick fog, gnarled trees, and moss-covered stones of Wistman’s Wood in Dartmoor, Devon, England. This particular wood has long been the subject of folklore and myth, with many writers describing it as the most haunted location in Dartmoor.

Despite the supernatural tales, Burnell is attracted to the atmosphere and photographic challenge of the English forest, and often visits the site at “blue hour” or the hour before the sun rises in the morning. “I have probably visited the woodland around 20 times in the last year, but unfortunately it has only had the required mist on two occasions,” Burnell explains to Colossal. “Photographing it without the mist/fog is a hard task and almost impossible to make images with the atmosphere I am looking for.”

Burnell continues to travel to Wistman’s Wood to seek the right environmental factors for a perfect image. You can follow his photographic adventures on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Science

Half a Century in the Making: Tree ‘Crop Circles’ Emerge in Japan

December 19, 2018

Johnny Waldman

image courtesy FNN

Two peculiar ‘crop circles’ have recently been spotted in Japan’s Miyazaki Prefecture. Viewable only from above, they were formed by sugi (Japanese cedar) trees.

Conspiracy theorists will be disappointed to learn that there is a very practical explanation for how these shapes emerged: science. Specifically, it was the result of a scientific experiment that spanned close to 50 years.

According to documentation (PDF) we obtained from Japan’s Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, in 1973 an area of land near Nichinan City was designated as “experimental forestry” and one of the experiments was to try and measure the effect of tree spacing on growth. The experiment was carried out by planting trees in 10 degree radial increments forming 10 concentric circles of varying diameters.

Part of what makes the crop circles so alluring are their concave shape, which was an unexpected result of the experiment that would suggest tree density does indeed affect growth. The trees are due to be harvested in about 5 years but officials are now considering preserving the crop circles.

Below is an image from Google Earth, which is unfortunately a bit dark. For those who are interested, here are the exact coordinates. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

image courtesy Google Earth

 

 



Art Photography

Temporary Installations Create Winding Paths Through a Forest in the South of England

July 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

For her 2011 series Come With Me, UK-based artist Ellie Davies (previously) constructed pathways through the New Forest in the South of England where she grew up. The pathways, built from wool, powder, paint, and mounds of dirt, follow the natural curvature of the trees and create a weaving line through space. The installations are each created with an intuitive spontaneity, and incorporate the labor as a central concept to the work. Davies carefully cleans up all the materials after she documents each trail. The photographer recently had a solo exhibition titled Into the Woods with A. galerie in Brussels. You can see more of her forest-based installations and digital compositions on her website and Facebook. (via Ignant)

 

 



Illustration

Explore Dawid Planeta’s Mystical World of Bright-Eyed Animal Guides

May 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Polish artist and graphic designer Dawid Planeta summons large beasts in his series of mystical grayscale illustrations set deep in the jungle. The series, Mini People in the Jungle, presents animals in profile, with glistening eyes that illuminate the darkness surrounds them. A small child is also present in each work, bravely facing the towering creatures with a torch or outstretched arms.

Planeta works his own experiences into the mysterious work, channeling his history with depression into a source for creative energy. “Depression – it’s not easy to deal with, but when you try, you can stop thinking about it as a weakness and turn it into something brilliant,” said Planeta. “That’s what I aim to accomplish with my art. [The] things I’m trying to depict are dark, mysterious and frightening, but if you look closely, you will find excitement, passion and joy.”

You can see more jungle explorations from the artist on tumblr and Behance. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Amazing Illustration

Lovingly Animated Woodland Scenes by Alexandra Dvornikova

September 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

London-based illustrator Alexandra Dvornikova animates enchanting moments in darkened woods, where fluorescent fungi flickers in the night and woodland creatures carry candles on their heads. Dvornikova shares more of her storybook images on Instagram and also sells prints through Society6.

 

 



Amazing Science

The Phenomenon Of “Crown Shyness” Where Trees Avoid Touching

August 14, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Photo © Dag Peak. San Martin, Buenos Aires.

Crown shyness is a naturally occurring phenomenon in some tree species where the upper most branches in a forest canopy avoid touching one another. The visual effect is striking as it creates clearly defined borders akin to cracks or rivers in the sky when viewed from below. Although the phenomenon was first observed in the 1920s, scientists have yet to reach a consensus on what causes it. According to Wikipedia it might simply be caused by the trees rubbing against one another, although signs also point to more active causes such as a preventative measure against shading (optimizing light exposure for photosynthesis) or even as a deterrent for the spread of harmful insects. (via Kottke, Robert Macfarlane)

 

 



Art Photography

Three-Dimensional Landscapes Formed with Layered Acrylic Photographs by Nobuhiro Nakanishi

June 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

© Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Susanne Hakuba

Japanese artist Nobuhiro Nakanishi creates sculptural works that attempt to preserve a singular moment in the natural world, capturing deeply pigmented sunsets and brightly-lit forests in a series he’s titled Layer Drawings. To produce the three-dimensional installations, Nakanishi first photographs an environment over a period of time. He then mounts selected images from his documentation on panels of acrylic in chronological order, allowing slight variation from frame to frame.

“We are all subject to the passing of time, yet each of us feels and perceives it in our own way,” says Nakaniski, “Time itself has no shape or boundary and cannot be fixed or grasped. When we look at the photographs in these sculptures, we attempt to fill in the gaps between the individual images. We draw from our physical experiences to fill in missing time and space, both ephemeral and vague. In this series, I attempt to depict time and space as sensations shared by both viewer and artist.”

Nakaniski is represented by Yukimo Chiba Associates in Tokyo. You can see more of his layered works on his website. (via Tu Recepcja)

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan
 (2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan 
(2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan 
(2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

© Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Susanne Hakuba

 

 

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