geometric

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Art Design

Geometric Dresses and Headpieces Created Entirely From Strands of Spaghetti

June 12, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

French interior designer and visual artist Alice Pegna is attracted to unusual or surprising materials, often using objects outside of their intended purpose. For her project Ex Nihilo, Pegna designed an entire series of geometric dresses and headpieces formed from pieces of uncooked spaghetti. “Spaghetti is basically reserved for cooking, and in the collective imagery it appears fragile. These two reasons pushed me to want to use it,” she explains in her artist statement about the project. “On the other hand I like its features. It has a certain flexibility due to its finesse, while remaining rigid and easy to split.”

Pegna starts each design by forming polygons, which create architectural details while also increasing the strength of the combined pieces. Each sculptural garment is intended to add to the human body, changing the way we see it by obscuring it as little as possible. This is clear in the way that Pegna displays her creations with minimal mannequins and matte backgrounds. The designer and artist wants to highlight the objects on the body while creating a sense of emotion with added effects of light and smoke.

In the future Pegna wishes to scale up her project even further by eliminating the mannequins and manipulating the material in space without support to test its limits. You can see more of her creations by visiting her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Textiles and Board Games Inspire Large-Scale Murals that Span Sidewalks, Streets, and Staircases

June 7, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Baltimore-based artists Jessie Unterhalter and Katey Truhn, known as Jessie and Katey, started creating murals because of the sheer accessibility of public art. The pair have always created work with a big visual impact, but as their designs grew they began to consider the possibility of working on the ground in addition to large-scale walls. Their site-specific floor works combine inspirations from both textiles and board games to create interactive walkways that encourage play and exploration. Jessie and Katey explain to Colossal that “the compositions are inspired by the viewer and how they might travel through the work. It’s really fun watching little kids interact with the floor murals—they always know what to do.”

The math behind both textile design and quilting is an aspect that the pair must consider when painting their large-scale works, and have started to inform how the pair begins each piece’s early designs. “We approach our large-scale work a bit like screen printers, even though we don’t screen print,” the pair explains. “Our process of execution is very methodical and we tend to think in planes or layers. This is probably a result of having to develop concepts and adapt them to larger spaces in a short amount of time. It’s interesting that painting murals has informed how we paint murals.”

This summer Jessie and Katey are working with the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation in Baltimore to create a site-specific mural for the Foundation’s new community space. The artists will also be painting a piece in Sacramento in collaboration with Wide Open Walls and later this fall will be working on an immersive installation incorporating recycled materials at Baltimore’s Goucher College, a rare opportunity for the pair to work in three dimensions. You can view more of Jessie and Katey’s work on their website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

The Square Wave Kinetic Sculpture Forms Complex Geometric Patterns as it Spins

May 18, 2019

Andrew LaSane

A recently launched Kickstarter campaign introduces a five-dimensional sculpture said to be inspired by mathematics and the Fibonacci sequence. Square Wave, the first in a collection from artist Ivan Black (previously) and Atellani, is an object constructed out of 21 precisely bent and connected metal rods with no hidden mechanical components. The toy fluidly transitions into various shapes and patterns based on the amount of kinetic energy applied and the way it is held and turned.

According to the campaign, Black’s work is inspired by natural forms and the mathematical patterns found in nature. Designed in the UK and built in Italy, the optical illusion creating the Square Wave sculpture is a hypnotic amalgam of those two elements. It is meant to be handled and observed often. The sculptures are available in three finishes (lunar gold, metallic silver, and eclipse bronze) and are currently only available to those who back the campaign with a pledge. To see more of Ivan Black’s work, check out his Instagram.

 

 



Craft

Intricate Tessellations Expand and Contract in New Folded Paper Works by Ekaterina Lukasheva

April 10, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

San Francisco-based paper artist Ekaterina Lukasheva (previously) makes dazzling tessellations seem like child’s play, effortlessly folding complex designs from matte and iridescent paper. The beautiful works have a double presentation, as they each work as expanded and contracted forms. Lukasheva has published several books on her DIY paper works, including her most recent Floral Origami: From Begin er to Advanced: 30 Delicious Origami Flowers and Balls for Home Decoration.  You can see more of her folded paper masterpieces in motion on Instagram.

 

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Art Design

Dimensions Blur in Aakash Nihalani’s Minimalist Optical Illusions

April 8, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Aakash Nihalani (previously) is known for his illusionist interventions that push the boundaries between two and three dimensions. Though he started off using using tape to form ephemeral installations, in the last few years Nihalani has moved into more permanent territory, working with wood and metal to form free-standing and wall-mounted sculptures. Throughout his practice, the artist works with simple geometric shapes and minimal black and white color palettes accented with neon. Nihalani, a Queens, New York native, graduated from New York University’s Steinhardt School in 2008. Discover more of his mind-bending installations on Instagram.

 

 

 



Animation Art

A Geometric Light Projection by Joanie Lemercier Invites Viewers to Take a Trip Through the Stars

March 18, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Constellations is a light-based audio-visual installation by Joanie Lemercier that explores the great expanse of our universe through the presentation of morphing geometric shapes and bright glowing orbs. The three-dimensional light work is projected onto water, which gives it a rippling, holographic effect, further intensified by an electronic soundscape produced by Paul Jebanasam. “It’s an exploration of the stars, constellations and the vastness of the cosmos, suggesting the beauty of geometry, simple and complex structures of the universe,” explains Lemercier. The project was first shown in Bristol, UK in March 2018 at Layered Realities in Millennium Square, and is produced by Juliette Bibasse. You can see a full preview of the Constellations in the video below, and follow the tour schedule on Instagram and Twitter.

 

 



Design

Everyday Consumer Goods Are De-Produced Into Rectangular Prisms of Raw Materials

February 22, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Volkswagen Beetle. Photograph by Ronald Smits

Dutch design team Studio Drift (previously) codifies the complex mix of materials that are used to create modern consumer goods in their newest series, Materialism. The collection reduces down recognizable items ranging from light bulbs and pencils to bicycles and even a Volkswagen Beetle. Raw materials like graphite, copper, rubber, polyurethane, and aluminum are shown as perfectly sliced blocks, emphasizing the original substance rather than the abstracted functional shape (like a rubber bicycle tube or graphite pencil core).

In a statement about the collection, Studio Drift describes the lofty goals of Materialism: “To make the essential nature of the world visible. If humankind could somehow perceive this connection to materials, to our collective consumption and the earth it impoverishes, it would be a leap in our social evolution, in building an awareness that we must somehow become better stewards of our future.”

Materialism was recently displayed with Pace Gallery at the Frieze Art Fair in Los Angeles, California. You can see more from Studio Drift on Facebook and Instagram. (via dezeen)

De-produced bicycle. Photograph by Gert Jan van Rooij

De-produced pencil. Photograph by Ronald Smits

De-produced light bulb. Photograph by Ronald Smits