geometric

Posts tagged
with geometric



Art Design

Landscapes of Glistening Digital Rectangles Formed and Subdivided by Algorithms

January 11, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Dimitris Ladopoulos (previously) creates random geometric patterns based on four-sided-forms by implementing an algorithm in the 3D animation program Houdini. The resulting designs look like intricate circuitboards or miniature architectural models, and include networks of gilded elements that glisten despite their digital composition. To create the works, the algorithm splits a rectangle vertically and then horizontally. “The number of splits is randomly selected from a given max,” he explains. “The outcome is fed to the loop, again and again, depending on the number of user defined iterations. A seed value and slight alterations of the algorithm produce a variety of results.”

The Athens-based motion graphics and visual designer has used a similar algorithm to divide artworks by color, constructing what appear to be three-dimensional color palettes from old paintings. You can see more of the designer’s work on his website and Behance.

    

 

 



Art Design

GHOSTKUBE: A Series of Interlocking and Buildable Block Transformations by Erik Åberg

December 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Swedish designer Erik Åberg (previously) wanted to recreate the concept of origami out of wood, while focusing on how the objects moved, rather than their specific form. During these experiments he developed a system of interlocking, moveable cubes called GHOSTKUBE.  “I was searching for a precise, and organic life-like movement like a school of fish or a flock of birds,” explains Åberg. “There is something in human beings that when we see that kind of movement, the nature, we are drawn to it. I think we intuitively look for it.”

To create this fluid movement, the designer started with simple structures containing only two or three cubes. He then began to mirror and double their positions, discovering hundreds of versions of the original sculpture that could move, fold, open, walk across tables, and morph in all directions. GHOSTKUBE is currently seeking funding on Kickstarter for two similar packs of cubes, which either come with 12 or 24 single cubes to piece together. You can view larger and more complex experiments with the GHOSTKUBE system in the video directed by Oskar Wrangö below. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Design

Spiked Sculptures by Matthew Shlian Create Angular Geometry from Folded Paper

November 22, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

“Unholy 103”

Paper engineer Matthew Shlian (previously here and here) combines intricate geometric tessellations with exact folds and creases to form bas-relief sculptures. Shlian has been crafting his paper artworks for several years. In recent sculptures the artist has introduced a vibrant color palette that strays dramatically from his traditional black and white works. Recent works include warm and cool tones, in addition to gouache washes that add texture and variation to his smooth paper surfaces.

In a statement on his website, Shlian explains, “My process is extremely varied from piece to piece. Often I start without a clear goal in mind, working within a series of limitations. For example on one piece I’ll only use curved folds, or make my lines this length or that angle, etc. Other times I begin with an idea for movement and try to achieve that shape or form somehow.”

Shlian is currently working on a book, tentatively due out in 2019. In the meantime you can see his work in person at Context Art Miami from December 4 – 9, 2018, shown by Duran | Mashaal Gallery. The artist also shares updates on his work via Instagram and Facebook.

“RLRR Hollow”

“Unholy 111”

“Unholy 116”

“As Long As You’re Here”

“Ara 333 Hollow”

“Unholy 105”

“Unholy 112”

“Unholy 105”

 

 



Animation

Hand-Drawn Gifs Created from Graphite and Marker by Benjamin Zimmermann

November 5, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Benjamin Zimmermann of KonkreteGifs uses pencils and Stabilo markers to create hand-drawn geometric animations. Cubes, hexagons, and other angular shapes are presented as three-dimensional explorations on plain white or gridded paper. The objects move, shift, and tumble across the space either in graphite grayscale or technicolor shades.

“I really love GIFs because they have to be short, but at the same time infinite loops,” the German artist explained to Colossal. “… I really like the unsteady character of my hand-drawn GIFs, they have something human that my 3D animations were missing. There are always little errors in my work.”

In 2013 Zimmermann began a Daily Cube project on Tumblr where he posted drawings, images or GIFs related to cubes each day. After 365 days Zimmermann ceased regular posting, however he still updates the site with some of his favorite cubed GIFs. His new project KonkreteGifs was inspired by Concrete art, a movement towards geometric abstraction in the 1930s and 40s. You can see his new work on Tumblr and follow him on Twitter. (via Cross Connect)

 

 

 



Art Illustration

Meditative Geometric Shapes Doodled on Old Ledgers by Albert Chamillard

November 1, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Albert Chamillard’s monochromatic pen drawings have drawn acclaim for their ability to calm the minds of viewers. It’s interesting to learn, then, that Chamillard listens to punk and metal while crafting his art, which he shared in an interview with Faithwaites. Though each monochromatic pen-wrought work is undeniably flat, the artist’s careful use of cross-hatching creates a sense of volume by contrasting more- and less-saturated areas. Chamillard uses found and deadstock paper, especially vintage ledgers, and engages the papers’ subtle blue and red writing rules to frame subtle zig-zag patterns within each imagined plane, which further enlivens his seemingly simple drawings.

When he’s not working on his personal projects after hours, Chamillard runs a drawing and book making studio in Tucson, Arizona. He is represented by Eric Firestone Gallery in New York and Etherton Gallery in Tuscon. You can see more from the artist on Instagam.

 

 



Design Food

New Geometrically-Inspired Pastries, Cakes, and Sweets by Dinara Kasko

September 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Dinara Kasko (previously here and here) uses her background as an architect and 3D visualizer to produce geometric cakes that at first glance seem impossible to eat. The mathematically-inspired shapes are digitally constructed with a modeling program, which Kasko then 3D prints in silicone to create a mould. Recently, she has begun to sell these designs on her website to provide home pastry chefs the chance to try one of her stunning creations. You can take a behind-the-scenes look into the digital modeling that goes into one of Kasko’s Toros passion fruit cakes in the video below, and see more of her triangulated designs on her website and Instagram.

 

 

 

 

 



Design Food Photography

Flat Lay Photographs Created From Found Household Materials by Kristen Meyer

August 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Connecticut-based designer Kristen Meyer (previously) creates flat lay photographs on pastel backgrounds with precisely arranged vegetables, crackers, and other organic materials like rocks and leaves. The works are geometrically minded, like a recent design which created an isometric grid from sliced melon and kiwi or sliced cheese rounds that were transformed into a field of interlocking circles on top of equally sized crackers. All of her arrangements are shot in her house where she keeps a studio, however she often travels to whichever room of the house as best light. On the way she picks up various materials for her photographs, pulling inspiration from found objects.

“As far as how I find materials to experiment with, it varies a lot,” she tells Colossal. “I generally work with what I can find around the house, inside or out. It begins as a scavenger hunt of sorts, and then a challenge as I begin to build.”

In the fall Meyer will begin a set decorating project with photographer Adrien Broom. You can follow her style arrangements on Instagram, and buy select prints of her photographs on her website.