geometric

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Photography

Architecturally-Inspired Self-Portraits by Photography Duo Daniel Rueda and Anna Devís

December 13, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Self-taught photographers Daniel Rueda and Anna Devís play out their love affair with architecture on their Instagrams @drcuerda and @anniset, posing each other amongst unique geometric elements found in buildings across Europe. The pair are both architects by trade, and met while studying at university.

“Before starting at university I used to draw everything that came into my mind,” Devís explained in a video made by Adorama. “That process was very long so I decided to change the way to express them. That’s why I came into photography. It was quicker and it also made me happy.”

Their work started off with playful photoshoots that transformed into “creativity-driven minimalistic architectural self-portraits,” which is how they classify their playful photography.

“Neither of us can hide that it is us that we both love to take pictures of the most because we appear in each others’ pictures,” Rueda told Adorama. “I think the background is sometimes even more important that the main subject in the picture, that is why buildings and architecture are so important for my photography.”

You can watch a behind-the-scenes look into the couple’s artistic process in an interview with them in this video by Adorama.

Image by @anniset

Image by @anniset

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @anniset

Image by @anniset

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @anniset

Image by @anniset

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @anniset

Image by @anniset

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

Image by @drcuerda

 

 

 



Craft Design Food

Colorful Paper Foods and Patterns by Maud Vantours

November 28, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Photography / Charlotte Ortholary @Figure.fr

Paper artist Maud Vantours brings paper to life through a wide variety of commercial and self-initiated projects that span 3D paper sculpture displays for top brands to editorial work for magazines and ad agencies. The French designer has also explored a more artistic realm with her organic Oscillations series. Vantours shares some of her most recent work on Instagram.

Photography / Charlotte Ortholary @Figure.fr

Photography / Charlotte Ortholary @Figure.fr

Photography / Charlotte Ortholary @Figure.fr

 

 



Art

Landscapes and Geometric Shapes Intersect in New Paintings by Mary Iverson

November 8, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Windmills, 12×12 inches, acrylic, ink, found photograph on panel, 2017

Using a combination of oil and acrylic paint, ink, and found photographs, Seattle-based artist Mary Iverson (previously) investigates the relationship between humans and their environment in her landscape overlay paintings. Iverson builds worlds where dramatically angled, brightly colored geometric shapes are caught in webs of competing perspective lines and grids, superimposed over otherwise tranquil scenery.

Iverson described her work to Amadeus Magazine: “In following my interests and working to resolve an artistic dichotomy within myself, between my love and nature and my fascination with the shipping industry, I came upon a visual solution that metaphorically echoes what we are facing in the world today.”

These paintings are included in Correspondence, her exhibition with Scott Albrecht at Andenken Gallery in Amsterdam, NL. The show opens on November 11. You can also see more of Iverson’s finished and in-progress works on Instagram.

Fort Bourtange, 12×12 inches, acrylic, ink, found photograph on panel, 2017

Amsterdam, 12×12 inches, acrylic, ink, found photograph on panel, 2017

Summer Triangle, Crater Lake National Park, 30×30 inches, oil on canvas 2017

Shipwreck, Yosemite National Park, 30×30 inches, oil on canvas, 2017

Shipwreck, Mount Rainier National Park, 30×30 inches, oil on canvas 2017

 

 



Art Design

A Towering 4-Story Organic Structure Built From Material as Thin as a Coin

September 12, 2017

Christopher Jobson

All photographs © NAARO

Minima | Maxima is the latest creation from Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY, known for their innovative fusion of computational design and architecture to build organic self-supporting structures. This new piece was commissioned by World Expo 2017 and now stands as a permanent structure on the grounds in Astana, Kazakhstan. Despite its impressive height of 43′ feet (13.1 meters), the core material used to build Minima | Maxima are 2mm strips of aluminum. From their project statement:

Minima | Maxima evolves the studio’s invention of ‘Structural Stripes’ — a signature material system for building self-supporting curvilinear structures — with a step in a direction that offers even more structural potential: multi-ply composite. Three layers of flat stripes — white and white sandwiching pink — are constructed in tandem, supporting one another as they assume curvature and gain height. One layer never exists independently, but contributes to and benefits from the unified whole as it is built.

The system warrants comparison to fiber technology — such as carbon or glass fiber — yet is unique in that unlike fibers, each individual component does not need to be in tension (a straight line), and/or their processing does not require any mold or temporary scaffolding. Also such a composite system is mechanically bonded, allowing for recomposition and corrections during construction.

You can see how the structure was assembled in the video below, and explore more work by THEVERYMANY on Instagram.

 

 



Animation Art

Angular Geometry: Colorful Daily GIFs from the Mind of Tyler Haywood

August 25, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Over four years ago, designer Tyler Haywood started posting GIFs on Tumblr under the name Angular Geometry. Haywood liked the process so much, he’s never stopped posting, creating a new custom GIF for his blog every single day. The GIFs are related to his interest in motion graphics, focusing on the tiny but captivating movements of Rubik’s Cube-like structures, rippling water, and dazzling rainbows.

“I have always thought of Angular Geometry as a sketchbook,” Haywood shares with Colossal. “Just open it up and see what happens. Every day is a fresh start, so there is no need to worry all that much. Sometimes I will scroll through my archive of over 1500 GIFs and see patterns or ideas that come through in my art that I didn’t realize were there in the moment of creation. It is an interesting catalog of my subconscious in some ways.”

His digital “sketchbook” just celebrated its four year anniversary, making him officially the longest running daily GIF artist on Tumblr. You can see more of his GIFs on his site Angular Geometry.

 

 



Art

Cut Plywood Relief Sculptures Embedded with Mandalas and Geometric Patterns by Gabriel Schama

August 18, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Here’s a few recent works by Oakland artist Gabriel Schama (previously here and here) who designs elaborately layered wood relief sculptures with the help of a laser cutter. The pieces are cut from a variety of different plywoods which he layers to create varying images of the human form, architectural studies, and mandala-like patterns. You can see more on his website, and in his shop.

 

 



Art

Twin Skulls Transform the Facade of this 19th Century French Castle

July 7, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Okuda San Miguel’s (previously) recently transformed 19th-century castle in Château, France is perhaps my favorite work by the artist to date. The intervention, titled Skull in the Mirror, covers the gigantic home’s facade in a mix of colorful polka dots, and is flanked on either side by two three-story skulls. Three dormer windows at the top of the castle are lined in bright red, blue, and orange, while the second story windows serve as openings for the prismatic skull’s four combined eyes.

After stints as a school and holiday center for children, the castle was abandoned for nearly 30 years.

Five years ago it was acquired by the local Town Hall. Recently it became a site for Urban Art Paris' LaBel Valette Festival, which hosted Okuda the last weekend in June. You can see a short video of the project, created by @chopemdownfilms, below.

A post shared by OKUDA SAN MIGUEL (@okudart) on

 

 

A Colossal

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