glass

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Art

Rugged Rocks Anchor Delicate Glass Coral in Elena Fleury-Rojo’s Sculptures

March 17, 2023

Grace Ebert

A photo of glass coral growing from a rock sculpture

All images © Elena Fleury-Rojo, shared with permission

Exquisite aquatic specimens sprout from craggy stones in Elena Fleury-Rojo’s Reef Formations sculptures. The British artist interprets the spindly shoots, scalloped-edge growths, and grooved tentacles of coral in clear or green borosilicate glass, which she fastens to rugged hunks of rock or marble. Melding land and sea and delicate and durable materials, the works draw parallels between the rapid death of the marine creatures and the disappearance of traditional flame-working techniques, both of which Fleury-Rojo sees as having potential for a “hopeful regeneration into full bloom.”

The sculptures shown here are part of the first volume of Reef Formations, some of which will be on view at Essex’s The Sentinel Galley for a dual exhibition opening on April 4. Fleury-Rojo currently has a few works available on Etsy and frequently shares glimpses into her studio and process on  Instagram.

 

A photo of glass coral growing from a rock sculpture

Two detail photos of glass coral growing from a rock sculpture

A photo of glass coral growing from a rock sculpture

A photo of glass coral growing from a rock sculpture

A photo of glass coral growing from a rock sculpture

A photo of glass coral growing from a rock sculpture

 

 

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Design

Traditional Glassblowing Methods Suffuse Kateryna Sokolova’s Modern Vessels with Historical Spirit

March 8, 2023

Kate Mothes

A blown-glass vessel that looks like it is drooping off the edge of a table.

All images © Kateryna Sokolova

It is often said that glass is a “slow-moving liquid” because it lacks of the molecular structure of true solids. Like oversized water droplets on the verge of slipping off the edge of a branch or a table, Ukrainian designer Kateryna Sokolova’s sculptural vessels draw on the medium’s natural malleability. GUTTA, a series of vases and carafes, draws on a rich tradition of glass-blowing in Ukraine and evokes a sense of paused time, as if the pieces are frozen in motion. “Through the curvaceous shape of the vases, I wanted to convey the mysterious power of nature and a sense of rhythm,” she says.

Sokolova’s designs are produced in Lviv by artisans who practice ancient glassblowing techniques, imbuing the modern forms with a historical dimension. GUTTA vessels are on view at the contemporary design fair Collectible in Brussels this weekend, and you can find more of the artist’s work on her website. (via Le Journal Du Design)

 

A blown-glass vessel that looks like it is drooping off the edge of a mossy branch.

A blown-glass vessel that looks like it is drooping off the edge of a table.

A blown-glass vessel that looks like it is drooping off the edge of a table.

A blown-glass vessel that looks like it is drooping off the edge of a cylindrical container.

A blown-glass carafe.

A blown-glass vessel photographed holding some flowers.

A blown-glass vessel that looks like it is drooping off the edge of a table.

A a collection of blown-glass vessel that look like they are drooping all over a table.

 

 



Art Craft Design

Supple Forms Bow and Bulge in Jonas Noël Niedermann’s Colorful Glass Sculptures

March 2, 2023

Grace Ebert

A photo of several colorful glass sculptures with curved and squiqqly edges

All images © Jonas Noël Niedermann, courtesy of Chesterfield Gallery, shared with permission

In his new body of work titled LoopsJonas Noël Niedermann plays with the possibilities of color, shape, and light. The Swiss artist is known for his keen interest in the malleable, varied properties of glass, and through a variety of hot and cold sculpting techniques, he creates elegant rings in a spectrum of jewel tones. Because of their curved and bowed edges, the delicate pieces shift in depth and color when viewed from different perspectives as sides appear layered or folded in. A brass finish also coats the bottom of each sculpture to accentuate the way light catches and casts prismatic shadows through the material.

Loops is on view from March 14 to April 4 at Chesterfield Gallery in New York. You can find more from the artist on his site and Instagram.

 

A photo of three colorful glass sculptures with curved edges

A photo of a light blue glass sculpture that appears like a twisting ring

A photo of several colorful glass sculptures with curved and squiqqly edges

A photo of light blue glass sculpture with two different rings, one attached to the top left of the other

A photo of two yellow glass sculptures with curved and squiqqly edges

A photo of several colorful glass sculptures with curved edges

A photo of several blue glass sculptures with curved edges

 

 



Art

Endangered Animals Dissolve and Reassemble in Thomas Medicus’s Anamorphic Glass Sculpture

February 15, 2023

Kate Mothes

Depending on which direction you approach from, you may encounter a lynx, a bee, a kingfisher, or a river trout in Austria-based Thomas Medicus’s new public installation. Moving around the work, one image gradually dissolves into abstract strips of color before a different creature assembles on another side. Known for his anamorphic sculptures (previously) that change with every 90-degree rotation, Medicus’s “Human Animal Binary” interlocks more than 144 strips of glass and focuses on four species native to the Tyrol region of Austria. All are endangered or threatened due to the increasing impacts of the climate crisis.

Constructed of glass, concrete, and metal, the vitrine that houses the artist’s glass animals nods to human-built structures and the urban landscape encroaching on natural habitats. The vessel itself “addresses a dilemma in which a large part of humanity finds itself: human habitat largely contradicts coexistence with non-human animals,” Medicus says in a statement. Contained within the cube, each specimen invites the viewer to look them in the eye and consider the delicate balance of the surrounding ecosystem, the fragility of existence, and the critical role humans play in both the destruction and preservation of nature.

Find more of Medicus’s work on his website and Instagram, and get further insights into the work in a short documentary on Vimeo.

 

A sculpture in a glass and metal cube on a concrete stand, containing more than 144 strips of glass that looks like a different animal on each side.

All images © Thomas Medicus, shared with permission

A sculpture in a glass and metal cube on a concrete stand, containing more than 144 strips of glass that looks like a different animal on each side.

A sculpture in a glass and metal cube on a concrete stand, containing more than 144 strips of glass that looks like a different animal on each side.

A detail of a sculpture in a glass and metal cube on a concrete stand, containing more than 144 strips of glass that looks like a different animal on each side.

A sculpture in a glass and metal cube on a concrete stand, containing more than 144 strips of glass that looks like a different animal on each side.

A detail of a sculpture in a glass and metal cube on a concrete stand, containing more than 144 strips of glass that looks like a different animal on each side. A sculpture in a glass and metal cube on a concrete stand, containing more than 144 strips of glass that looks like a different animal on each side.  A photograph of a man cycling around a public sculpture in a glass and metal cube on a concrete stand, containing more than 144 strips of glass that looks like a different animal on each side.

A photograph of an Austrian public square with mountains in the background and a public sculpture by Thomas Medicus in the foreground.

 

 



Art Science

‘Glass Microbiology’ Magnifies Viruses, Bacteria, and Other Organisms to 1 Million Times Their Actual Size

January 23, 2023

Grace Ebert

A photo of a glass vaccine sculpture

“AstraZeneca vaccine.” All images © Luke Jerram, shared with permission

Bristol-based artist Luke Jerram (previously) continues to add delicate specimens to his Glass Microbiology collection. The ongoing project is a collaboration with scientists at the University of Bristol, who aid Jerram in scaling three-dimensional renderings of avian flu, papillomavirus, the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine, and other tiny organisms into sculptures approximately one million times their actual size. Transparent and impeccably detailed, the models are designed to showcase the structures of each microbe without distorting the viewer’s perception with non-existent colors, which are often used to distinguish various parts in illustrated renderings.

Jerram documents the process behind his swine flu sculpture in the video below, which begins with two artists hand-blowing the larger structure. The team then shapes hundreds of individual proteins that will later be fused to the virus’s exterior. Find more of the scientifically minded project on the Glass Microbiology site, and follow Jerram’s latest works on Instagram.

 

A photo of a glass virus sculpture

“Papillomavirus”

A photo of three glass virus sculptures

A photo of a glass virus sculpture

“Avian Flu 2012”

A photo of a glass virus sculpture

“EV1 (Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease)”

A detail photo of a glass vaccine sculpture

Detail of “AstraZeneca vaccine”

A photo of a glass parasite sculpture

“Giardia”

A photo of a glass ameoba sculpture

“Ameoba”

 

 



Art Craft

Delicate Stained Glass Butterflies and Moths Flit and Flutter with Illuminated Colors

January 20, 2023

Grace Ebert

A photo of a stained glass butterfly

All images © Melanie, shared with permission

From her home studio in the Netherlands, artist Melanie solders vivid stained glass renditions of monarchs, peacock butterflies, and Spanish moon moths. She first scours etymological sources for information on colors, vein placements, and antennae, then sketches a pattern for tracing and cutting the fragile material and pieces together the delicate specimens. Like their real-life counterparts, the creatures are delicate and lively, although these cast vibrant reflected light around the spaces they inhabit. Follow the artist’s growing swarm of bees and butterflies on Instagram.

 

Four photos of stained glass butterflies

A photo of a stained glass butterfly

A photo of a stained glass beetle

A photo of a stained glass bee on a table

A photo of a stained glass butterfly on a table

A photo of two stained glass butterflies in a window