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Art

Glitched Paintings by Olan Ventura Give a Contemporary Twist to 17th Century Still Lifes

September 4, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“Still Life of Flowers, Shells and Insects” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 76.2 x 101.6 cm. All images courtesy of the artist, the Working Animals Art Projects and Yavuz Gallery

Filipino artist Olan Ventura creates lavish acrylic paintings in the tradition of 17th century Dutch still lifes. Replicating the smallest details of iconic works such as Jan Davidsz de Heem’s Vase of Flowers (c. 1660), Ventura veers off course with striking glitches and drips that shoot off the canvas edges, seeming to pull grapes, lobsters, and roses from the past into the present. A statement on Yavuz Gallery explains that Ventura is interested in identity, technology, popular culture. Ventura holds a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts from University of the East, and has been exhibiting in solo shows for the last 15 years. His most recent show, Colour Feast, ran this spring at Yavuz Gallery in Singapore. Ventura keeps a low profile online, but you can explore more of his still life paintings on Yavuz’s website, and a wider range of his work on artnet. (via Hi-Fructose)

“Abundant Bouquet with Pomegranate” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 162.5 x 121.9 cm

“Still Life With Golden Goblet” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 121.9 x 137.2 cm

L: “Still Life with a Melon and Pears” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 45.7 x 61 cm / R: “Fruit Basket” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 45.7 x 61 cm

“Still Life of Flowers” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 101.6 x 76.2 cm

“Fruit Still Life” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 101.6 x 76.2 cm

Yavuz Gallery installation view

Yavuz Gallery installation view

 

 



Art

Narrative Dramas Unfold in Robert Proch’s Multi-Dimensional Glitched Paintings and Murals

April 25, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Robert Proch combines the aesthetics of street art and fine art in his dizzyingly complex paintings and murals. The artist engages multiple perspectives, glitched repetitions of figures, architectural motifs, and tightly controlled color palettes to create his distinctive style. Scenes tend to radiate out from a central perspective point, surrounded by abstracted shapes and atmospheric brushstrokes.

Proch’s artist statement describes his work as mini-narratives that “examine the modern human condition using vivid colors and tangible emotions. Sentimentality, ambition, fear, loss, hubris, greed, and friendship play their roles in snapshot dramas.”

The artist studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Poznan, Poland, which is where he currently resides. Proch also explores his signature style in the mediums of drawing and wood bas-relief sculpture, which you can view on his website and Instagram. (via Booooooom)

 

 



Art

Glitched-Out Rugs Designed from Traditional Textiles by Faig Ahmed

November 14, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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All images courtesy of Faig Ahmed Studio

Initially interested in the complexities of modern and ancient language, artist Faig Ahmed (previously) translated his fascination to the intricacies of carpet patterns, especially those from Turkey, Persia, India, and Caucasus. Distorting their original composition, Ahmed produces designs that break out of the traditional shape of luxury carpets, producing works that seem to split, drip, and separate on the wall.

His latest textile piece were created on a traditional loom, contemporary glitches and manipulations formed through age-old weaving techniques. Many of these recent works are also linked to Ahmed’s interests in genetic research and quantum physics, the mutated rugs serving as his attempt to display the impossibility of finding symmetry in nature and a chaotic world.

This past year Ahmed’s rugs were featured in shows at the Museum of Fine Art Boston, Bellevue Art Museum, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland, the Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design, and Museum of Old and New Art in Tasmania. His most recent exhibition, Source Code, opens November 17 at Sapar Contemporary in New York City and runs through January 5, 2017.

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Art

Faig Ahmed Creates Glitched-Out Contemporary Rugs from Traditional Azerbaijani Textiles

November 17, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Faig Ahmed distorts the patterns of traditional Azerbaijani rugs, dismantling their structure in order to build compositions that trick the eye by appearing to melt off the wall. By rearticulating the original design, he creates contemporary sculptural forms that look like digital glitches, patterns flatlining halfway through a tapestry or gradually morphing into a digital mosaic.

Ahmed explains that his fascination for textiles stems from their historical value, humanity utilizing fabric for nearly the entire length of human history. “Another thing that interests me is pattern,” says Ahmed. “Patterns and ornaments can be found in all cultures, sometimes similar, sometimes very different. I consider them words and phrases that can be read and translated to a language we understand.”

Ahmed lives and works in Baku, Azerbaijan and graduated from the sculpture department of Azerbaijan State Academy of Fine Art in 2004. The artist previously focused on painting, video, and installation, but now currently focuses on textile and sculpture. Ahmed recently had a solo exhibition with Italian gallery Montoro12 titled “Omnia Mutantur, Nihil Interit,” and is currently in the group exhibition “Crafted: Objects in Flux” at The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston until January 10, 2016. (via Booooooom)

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