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Art Illustration

Meditative Geometric Shapes Doodled on Old Ledgers by Albert Chamillard

November 1, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Albert Chamillard’s monochromatic pen drawings have drawn acclaim for their ability to calm the minds of viewers. It’s interesting to learn, then, that Chamillard listens to punk and metal while crafting his art, which he shared in an interview with Faithwaites. Though each monochromatic pen-wrought work is undeniably flat, the artist’s careful use of cross-hatching creates a sense of volume by contrasting more- and less-saturated areas. Chamillard uses found and deadstock paper, especially vintage ledgers, and engages the papers’ subtle blue and red writing rules to frame subtle zig-zag patterns within each imagined plane, which further enlivens his seemingly simple drawings.

When he’s not working on his personal projects after hours, Chamillard runs a drawing and book making studio in Tucson, Arizona. He is represented by Eric Firestone Gallery in New York and Etherton Gallery in Tuscon. You can see more from the artist on Instagam.

 

 



Art

New Sprawling Ink Drawings by Olivia Kemp Explore the Landscapes of Malta and Bavaria

August 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All images courtesy of Olivia Kemp

British artist Olivia Kemp (previously) creates sprawling, large-scale ink drawings of real world landscapes that are built from photography, observational sketches, and her own memories of the visited destinations. Her two most recent works took a combined nine months to complete, and are pulled from her travels to Malta and Bavaria. Kemp’s drawing “Ascending The High Pass” is inspired by Bavaria’s castles, and is composed of towers, cliffs, and a winding train line that connects the city through a series of bridges and tunnels.

For her other recent piece, she focused more on the plant life of the location. “Unlike with the castles drawing, ‘Melita, Maleth’ was very much a response to selecting a random location and spending time there getting to know it,” Kemp tells Colossal. “I was interested in going to Malta, but didn’t have any particular drawing or architectural style or composition in mind before I went. I loved the variation of plant life on the island, and felt really strongly that the drawing needed to have a full and rich foreground, including all the flora that had most interested me.”

Kemp will often create smaller drawing studies while on location, which she will then incorporate into her larger works. Both “Ascending The High Pass” and “Melita, Maleth” will be included in the group exhibition Early Modern Matters which opens on September 6 at James Freeman Gallery in London and closes September 29, 2018. You can see more of the artist’s work on Instagram and Twitter.

"Melita, Maleth" in process

“Melita, Maleth” in process

"Melita, Maleth"

“Melita, Maleth”

"Melita, Maleth" in process

“Melita, Maleth” in process

"Melita, Maleth" with reference drawings

“Melita, Maleth” with reference drawings

"Melita, Maleth" in process

“Melita, Maleth” in process

Detail of "Ascending The High Pass"

Detail of “Ascending The High Pass”

"Ascending The High Pass" in process

“Ascending The High Pass” in process

"Ascending The High Pass"

“Ascending The High Pass”

"Ascending The High Pass" in process

“Ascending The High Pass” in process

Olivia drawing "Ascending The High Pass"

Olivia drawing “Ascending The High Pass”

 

 

 



Art Photography

Swirls of Electrifying Ink and Found Crystal Formations Transformed into Hair by Lorna Simpson

May 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Brooklyn-based artist Lorna Simpson combines images of black men and women pulled from vintage advertising photos with bright ink washes to give her subjects kaleidoscopic hairstyles erupting with color. The photographs are snipped from old issues of Ebony and Jet magazines and are either layered with ink or found textbook imagery like crystalized growths to explore the deep and varied language of hair. In one piece the subject is adorned with a thick slab of rock, while in another a cross-section of a human brain acts as the subject’s coiffed hairstyle.

Over 150 of these collages have been compiled in her recent book Lorna Simpson Collages, out early next month through Chronicle Books. The volume contains an artist’s statement and an introduction by poet, author, and scholar Elizabeth Alexander who explains, “Black women’s heads of hair are galaxies unto themselves, solar systems, moonscapes, volcanic interiors.”

You can currently preorder the book on Amazon, and view more collages by Simpson on her website.

 

 



Illustration

Delicate Inked Lines Form Fluffy Black Cats in Illustrations by Kamwei Fong

March 22, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Using only black ink, Malaysian illustrator Kamwei Fong has created a menagerie of playful black cats. Despite their contextual isolation and uniform style, each of Fong’s cats display unique personalities: some are fluffed and puffed into self-contained balls; others look with curiosity or wariness at fish that dangle or waves that crash from the animals’ own tails. The artist builds each feline form using innumerable short thin lines, varying the density of the marks to create volume as well as a palpable sense of furriness.

Fong has been working as an illustrator since 2010, under the moniker Bo & Friends, and in addition to his cat character, which he calls The Furry Thing, he dreams up similarly charming monkeys, goldfish, puppies, and other animals in his line-driven black ink drawings. Fong sells signed print editions of his animal illustrations in his Etsy shop, and also partners with Galerie Club Sensible in Paris. You can see more of his work on Instagram and Facebook.

 

 



Art Illustration

Wondrously Detailed Paintings by Alice Lin Show the Complex Relationship Between Self and Surroundings

March 8, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

In the Ocean #2, 35 x 28 inches

Illustrator Alice Lin uses watercolor and pigment on rice paper and silk to create intricately detailed worlds. Human and animal figures are enveloped in pastel-toned bursts of swirling flowers, mushrooms, oceans, and rock formations. Despite their storybook-like quality, many of Lin’s works are fairly large, with some spanning more than three feet wide.

In an interview with Wow x Wow, Lin describes the intention behind her work: “It’s about exploring the internal and external, about the relationships between the two; self and surroundings; human beings and the world… Our body is a container, connected to the outside world and our breath, blood, thoughts, feelings, emotions, dreams, etc. are the content; through this content we are able to experience life, and we are able to learn about art, the world or ourselves.”

The Beijing-based artist shares her work on Behance, and you can also follow her on Instagram.

Mystery / 秘境, 31 x 47 inches

What we talk about when we were talking / 我们在谈论什么, diptych, 43 x 36 inches

Faramita / 彼岸, 83 x 41 inches

Faramita, in process

Toadstool Spirit / 毒蘑菇精, 17.5 inches

 

 



Illustration

Stippled Black and White Illustrations of Star-Packed Galaxies by Petra Kostova

February 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Copenhagen-based graphic designer and illustrator Petra Kostova of Pet & Dot creates dazzling galaxies composed of millions of stippled dots. To produce her concentrated star systems and cloudy nebulas she uses technical pens (either rOtring Rapidograph or Isograph) to draw on black and white paper. Due to the limitations of her color scheme, each work is completely formed through the intensity of her chosen dots—a meditative process which can often take her several weeks or months to complete.

Kostova also produces handmade prints created by a technique called Photogravure, which accurately reproduces her stippled detail. You can find these, and her original drawings, on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art Illustration

Watercolor Illustrations That Trace the Dark and Light Elements of Storybook Myths by Amber Ma

November 15, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

New York-based artist and illustrator Amber Ma subtly integrates elements of darkness into her fantasy-based illustrations. Her inspirations are grounded in childhood stories, such as her series Pinocchio Forest which visually investigates the myth surrounding the storybook puppet’s long nose. In the series of watercolor and sumi ink works Ma mixes elements of tension and warmth. This contrast interrogates the notion of a lie, presenting how the action can both hurt and protect those closest to us.

Ma received both her BFA and MFA in Illustration from the School of the Visual Arts. This fall she was included in the group exhibition Parallel at Light Grey Art Lab in Minneapolis. You can view more of the illustrator’s work on her Instagram and Behance.