jewelry

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Design

Enamel Pins Turn International Architectural Destinations Into Pocket-Sized Accessories

September 16, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Pagoda House, Tel Aviv

The husband and wife duo behind Drop-a-Pin have turned their love of architecture into an enamel pin business, transforming some of the world’s most recognizable buildings into miniature, 2-D renditions. The Drop-a-Pin duo explains that, thanks to their professional training as architects, most of the buildings they’ve turned into pins are ones they were familiar with. The pair spent the last five years traveling around the world to document buildings they love.

From Nakagin Capsule Tower in Toykyo to the Geisel Library in San Diego, each pin conveys the facade, silhouette, and color palette of the buildings that inspired them, while keeping a clean, minimalist look. “We developed a simple method we learned at the university in a course called Basic Design,” the team explains to Colossal. “The first and only law is to maintain the minimum number of lines necessary so that the building can still be identified. Once the lines in the design could no longer be erased, we reached the destination.”

Drop-a-Pin is currently raising funds on Indiegogo, where you can place a pre-order for the pin design of your choosing. See more of their designs on Instagram.

Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles

Pantheon, Italy

Villa Savoye, France

Clockwise from top left: Guaranty Building, Buffalo NY; VitraHaus, Germany; Notre Dame, Paris; house on Rothschild Boulevard, Tel Aviv

Geisel Library, California

Eames House, California

Nakagin Capsule Tower, Tokyo

 

 



Art

Tiny Metal Plants, Animals, and Buildings are Liberated From Coins by Artist Micah Adams

August 31, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Toronto-based artist Micah Adams uses a jeweler’s saw to cut out the embossed animals, figures, and objects from coins of different sizes and denominations. The metal cut-outs are used to create tiny readymades and fun collages. From a growing pile of copper leaves taken from Canadian pennies, to intricate birds and flowers borrowed from foreign currency, each of Micah Adams works are hand cut using the same basic tool. Working at a smaller scale is something that the artist came to in art college while making sculptures and spending his free time in the jewelry and metal smithing department. The practice of cutting coins evolved out of using other materials.

“I was making small assemblages from things I’d collected over the years, tiny things like toys, bottle caps, beach finds and even teeth,” Adams tells Colossal. “Then I cast them in metal. They were like tiny bronzes or miniature monuments. That lead me to look for tiny things that were already metal that I could use. So I looked at coins and their designs for things I could cut-out.”

Micah Adams is currently working on another solo exhibition of his coin collages and other works which will open at MKG127 in Toronto in February 2020. He also has an Etsy shop where he sells earrings, tie tacks, and other keepsakes. For future updates and to see more of his art, follow Adams on Instagram.

 

 



Art Design

Sculptural Metal Jewelry by Ewa Nowak Helps Wearers Avoid Being Tracked by Facial Recognition Technology

August 26, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Several methodologies have been tested to try and thwart growing facial recognition technologies, however perhaps none are as elegant as Polish designer Ewa Nowak’s metal jewelry. Her project, Incognito, was born out of her own uneasiness about the global state of privacy, and was tested using Facebook’s DeepFace algorithm to ensure its success.

The implement is worn like glasses, with arms reaching around the wearer’s ears. Two round pieces of metal cover each cheek, and an elongated piece extends upward between the eyes, creating a trifecta of polished objects that help deflect software used IRL in security systems and public cameras, and online through social media.

Incognito recently won the Mazda Design Award at the Łódź Design Festival. You can see more of her projects, including a reflective mask also used as a way to keep one’s anonymity, on her website and Instagram. (via Plain Magazine)

 

 



Art

Crystal Hearts and Translucent Tongues Shaped Into Sculptural Works by Debra Baxter

August 12, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

“Cross My Heart” (2019), Glass, Crystal Geode, 4.5″ x 5″ x 3″

Santa Fe-based sculptor and jewelry designer Debra Baxter combines glass, bronze, crystal, wood, and found objects to create ghostly sculptures of human forms. In one piece titled “Cross My Heart” (2019), a purple heart sits on top of a rough cluster of geodes, while in ‘First Taste” (2017), a glass tongue protrudes from a slab of quartz crystal.

For many of her recent works Baxter, shares with Roq Larue Gallery that she drew inspiration from the phenomenon of the “Ghost Heart.” In this medical procedure, a heart is cleansed of all of its blood cells and then injected with hundreds of millions of new blood steam cells which cause the heart to begin beating again. Baxter is interested in how this concept explores the complexity of existence, walking the line between life and death.  You can see more of her sculpted hearts and wearable artworks on her website and Instagram.

“Crystal Brass Knuckles (Aura Blow)” (2017), Aqua Aura Crystal and White Rhodium Plated Bronze, 7″ x 5″ x 2″

“Ghost Hand” (2019), Glass, Smoky Quarts, 13″ x 11″ x 12″

“First Taste” (2017), Glass and Quartz Crystal, 6″ x 8″ x 4″

“Silver Heart” (2019), Silver, Quartz, 3″ x 3.5″ x 5.75″

“I’m Your Venus” (2017), Cast Glass, Bronze, 5″ x 5.5″ x 2.5″

“Wind Knocked In” (2017), Amethyst, Bronze, Mopany Wood, 9.5″ x 15″ x 6.5″

“Heart of Gold” (2019), Bronze, Thunder Bay amethyst, 3″ x 3.5″ x 5.75″

 

 



Art Design

Silicone Formations by Seulgi Kwon Translate Fictionalized Microscopic Organisms into Necklaces, Brooches, and Rings

May 14, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"Sunday Morning," brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, fabric, 4.7" x 4.3" x 2.9", all images as courtesy of Mobilia Gallery

“Sunday Morning,” brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, fabric, 4.7″ x 4.3″ x 2.9″, all images courtesy of Mobilia Gallery

Korean jewelry maker Seulgi Kwon forms silicone into thin, translucent objects meant to be worn on the chest or finger. The glass-like shapes are surrounded by colorful thread, pigment, and paper, which imitate the appearance of microscopic organisms. “At each stage of creation, cells change in form through growth, division, and extinction, creating order and harmony within nature,” she explains in her artist statement. “Using silicone, a synthetic material that can change in texture and transparency, I express the organic movement and shape of cells with their mysterious color and constantly changing forms.”

Kwon is part of an upcoming group exhibition that will explore non-traditional materials in contemporary jewelry titled Material Revolution. The show opens May 15 and runs through June 2, 2019 at at Pistachios in Chicago. You can see more iterations of her wearable silicone sculptures on Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

"An Old Dancer" (2017), Silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, feather, 7.3” x 4” x 3.5”

“An Old Dancer” (2017), Silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, feather, 7.3” x 4” x 3.5”

"Two of pentacles" (2017), brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, fabric, 7.5” x 4.5” x 2.75”

“Two of pentacles” (2017), brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, fabric, 7.5” x 4.5” x 2.75”

"On your side" (2015), brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic 5.5” x 3.5” x 2”

“On your side” (2015), brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic 5.5” x 3.5” x 2”

"A Slow Walker," brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, paper, plastic bead, 6.6" x 8.1" x 1.5" (L) "Swing of the Night," brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, feather, 9.8" x 6.2" x 3.1" (R)

“A Slow Walker,” brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, paper, plastic bead, 6.6″ x 8.1″ x 1.5″ (L) “Swing of the Night,” brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, feather, 9.8″ x 6.2″ x 3.1″ (R)

"Forest of memory," (2017) brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, feather, 9” x 5” x 3.5”

“Forest of memory,” (2017) brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, feather, 9” x 5” x 3.5”

"The Day After," brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, fabric, 5.9" x 5.5" x 2.7"

“The Day After,” brooch, silicone, pigment, thread, plastic, fabric, 5.9″ x 5.5″ x 2.7″

 

 



Art Design

Antique Ceramic Dinnerware Punctured into Pieces of Wearable Art by Gésine Hackenberg

March 6, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Amsterdam-based jewelry designer Gésine Hackenberg is classically trained as a goldsmith, yet works with objects that are extracted from the everyday. After becoming bored with the traditional ideas of jewelry in her original field, she began to twist the function of common pieces like ceramic dinnerware to create unique designs. For her line of ceramic jewelry, Hackenberg first finds vintage plates and bowls from secondhand shops, which she then punctures to create small circular “pearls.” These are either strung together to create an ornate necklace, or set in silver for a pair of earrings or brooch. Hackenberg studied jewelry design at the Fachhochschule für Gestaltung Pforzheim in Germany and is currently a visiting professor at the MAD School of Arts in Hasselt, Belgium. You can see more of her collections, like this set of copper fruit jewelry, on her website.

 

 



Design

Handcrafted Hair Ornaments with Ornate Botanical Designs by Sakae

March 1, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

All photos by Ryoukan Abe

Japanese artist Sakae (previously) continues to create elaborate botanically-inspired hair combs using liquid resin and wire. The hair combs, or kanzashi, have a long history of use in Japanese hairstyles, and today they are often reserved for special occasions such as weddings and tea ceremonies. Sakae captures a wide range of colors and textures in her hairpieces, from the rippling edges of carnation petals to the geometric clusters of hydrangea blossoms. Sakae’s hairpieces are sold via auction, which she announces on her website and Facebook page. She also shares her work on Pinterest.