light

Posts tagged
with light



Animation Art Photography

Light Painting Animations Create Dazzling Effects Around Glass Spheres

July 31, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

During his last few months in school, recent University of Maryland graduate Josh Sheldon built a light animation robot scaled to the size of his small college bedroom. For the personal project, Sheldon taught himself Blender, Python, and Dragonframe in just under two weeks. The device allowed him to create dazzling effects around spheres and cubes, with each animation taking between four and twelve hours to shoot. You can view the process behind Sheldon’s robot in the view below, and take a look at the code he used for each of his light paintings over on Github. More of Josh’s work, including these light portraits, can be found on his Instagram. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

 

 



Art Food

Luminous Portraits of Sliced Fruit Glow Like Stained Glass Windows

July 6, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Rosettes Series #16, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches

Artist Dennis Wojtkiewicz paints enormous portraits of sliced fruit, often scaling four feet across or more. Each oil on canvas painting focuses exclusively on the edible subject, with dramatic backlit lighting seeming to light up the melons, citrus, apples, and kiwis. While Wojtkiewicz focuses on tiny details like individual segments of juice, striations, and the fuzzy skins, the realism is tempered by a slightly hazy, impressionistic finish. The artist is represented by Robert Kidd Gallery. You can see more of his paintings on his website. (via My Modern Met)

Melon Series #34, oil on canvas, 30 x 60 inches

Citrus Series #15, oil on canvas, 37 x 64 inches

Apple Series #2, oil on canvas, 48 x 50 inches

Rosettes Series #17, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches

Kiwi Series #4, oil on canvas, 48 x 44 inches

Rosettes Series #15, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches

Horn Melon Series #4, oil on canvas, 36 x 72 inches

Citrus Series #8, oil on canvas, 36 x 60 inches

Rosettes Series #13, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches

Citrus Series #12, oil on canvas, 27 x 72 inches

 

 



Art

Studio Drift’s Solo Exhibition ‘Coded Nature’ Floats a Concrete Monolith Above Museum Visitors

June 25, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

Photo: Gert Jan van Rooij. Meadow (2017), choreographed in 2018. Aluminum, stainless steel, printed fabric, LEDs, robotics. Collection Studio Drift, Amsterdam, courtesy collection DELA, Eindhoven.

One of the must-see shows in Amsterdam this summer is the debut museum solo of Studio Drift (previously) at Stedelijk Museum, which balances elements of tech art, performance, and biodesign. The exhibition, titled Coded Nature, presents a wide range of transdisciplinary works from the Dutch studio that engage with topics from sustainability to issues raised by the growing use of augmented reality.

Founded by Lonneke Gordijn and Ralph Nauta, Studio Design typically creates installation, sculptural works, video projections, and interactive VR. One of the standout pieces in their new exhibition is Drifter, a floating concrete monolith measuring 13 x 6 1/2 feet, which tenderly levitates inside one of the museum galleries (the video below shows the work on display in 2017 at the Armory Show in New York). The puzzling effect of seeing such a familiar object floating through space is emphasized with a video projection of the film Drifters, which follows the same concrete sculpture as it floats through the Scottish Highlands.

Contrasting the effect of the large floating concrete block is the breathtaking installation Fragile Future Chandelier 3.5 which consists of countless bionic dandelions with glowing LED lights at their centers. The labor-intensive installation, like many of the studio’s works, challenges relationships between man, nature, and technology. Other works include the light installations Tree of Ténéré and Flylight, and kinetic installations Semblance and In 20 Steps, which are all based on naturally designed forms or movements.

Studio Drift: Coded Nature will run through August 26, 2018. You can see more site-specific installations and science fiction-inspired works on the studio’s website and Instagram, and take a deeper look inside the duo’s process in the videos below.

Photo: Sasha Bogojev for Colossal

Photo: Gert Jan van Rooij. Flylight (2009). Glass, custom made fittings, LEDs, algorithm, electronics, sensors. Courtesy Carpenters Workshop Gallery, London.

Photo: Gert Jan van Rooij. Gazm and Studio Drift, branch of Tree of Ténéré (prototype 2017). Steel, hand modeled epoxy, paint, rubber, LEDs, electronics. Collection GAZM, courtesy Pace Gallery, New York.

Fragile Future Chandelier 3.5 (2012), manufactured under the control of Carpenters Workshop Gallery. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.

Fragile Future detail modules. Courtesy of Carpenters Workshop Gallery.

Ghost Collection

Photo: Tom Cornelissen. Drifter (2018), Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Courtesy of Pace Gallery.

 

 



Art

New Glowing Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood are Activated by Sunlight

June 20, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

British artist Chris Wood (previously) continues to create sculptural dichroic glass installations. The artist forms seemingly spare geometric shapes in windows and on on white panels, which come to life with streaks of color when hit with sunlight. You can see more of Wood’s work, including large scale installations and commissions, on her website and Instagram. She’ll also be opening her studio for Cambridge Open Studios in July, 2018.

 

 



Food Photography

New Distorted Photographs by Suzanne Saroff Capture Skewed Perspectives of Food and Plants

June 1, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Suzanne Saroff (previously) continues her Perspective series, using water and glass to warp the appearance of vibrantly colored dragon fruits, lobsters, cabbages and other flora and fauna. You can see more of her striking images including the still life series titled Shadows, on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Colorful Light Sculptures by James Clar Interpret Technology’s Effects on Our Perceived Reality

April 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Wheeeeeeeeeeeee! (2015), neon, 125 x 155 cm

James Clar, Wheeeeeeeeeeeee! (2015), neon, 125 x 155 cm

Artist James Clar creates sculptural light systems that interpret the ways modern technology has altered our perception of reality and time. His multi-colored works often imitate society’s relationship to the screen, such as in his work Increasing Resolution, which shows the rapid incline of digital resolution on our TVs, computers, and phones, or his 2015 sculpture Wheeeeeeeeeeeee! which expresses the loosening of language structures due to an increasing dependence on communicating through technological devices.

“The majority of our daily experience and information comes from the artificial light sources of our screens and phones, shifting our habitat from the physical space around us to the non-physical space of online digital systems” explains Clar in an artist statement.

Clar received his masters in interactive telecommunication from New York University. He has an upcoming solo exhibition at Jane Lombard Gallery in NYC later this year. You can see more of the artist’s work on his Instagram and website.

Space Is A Hologram (2014), LED lights, filters, wire, 105 x 120 cm

Space Is A Hologram (2014), LED lights, filters, wire, 105 x 120 cm

Nemo (2013), fluorescent lights, filters, 130 x 75 cm

Nemo (2013), fluorescent lights, filters, 130 x 75 cm

Binary Star, (2016), LEDs, filters, wire, 190 x 190 cm

Binary Star, (2016), LEDs, filters, wire, 190 x 190 cm

Increasing Resolution (2012), fluorescent lights, filters, 120 x 190 cm

Increasing Resolution (2012), fluorescent lights, filters, 120 x 190 cm

Thermal Energy (2013), 160 x 120 x 90 cm

Thermal Energy (2013), 160 x 120 x 90 cm

Horizontal Force (2015), LEDs, filters, wire, 220 x 120 cm

Horizontal Force (2015), LEDs, filters, wire, 220 x 120 cm

BOOM (2011), fluorescent lights, acrylic tubes and light filters, 85 x 120 cm

BOOM (2011), fluorescent lights, acrylic tubes and light filters, 85 x 120 cm

 

 



Art Design

Light Leaks: A Shimmering Room Filled with Fifty Disco Balls and Hundreds of Reflected Points of Light

April 10, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Installation at The Music Center LA

Kyle McDonald and Jonas Jongejan filled a darkened room with fifty disco balls and created colored and timed lighting sequences to cast mesmerizing reflections that surround visitors. However, rather than simply relying on scattershot reflections, McDonald and Jongejan used hundreds of structured light scans to capture the volumetric position of every pixel being projected by each of the three projectors. The pair then used SketchUp to predict the reflected pixel positions.

The designers describe Light Leaks as “a curious space that alternates between a meditative state, and an uneasy imbalance. An experiment in combining a found object with computer vision to create a profound and unusual experience.” It has since been installed at La Gaîté Lyrique (Paris, 2014) and Scopitone Festival (Nantes, 2015), and most recently at The Music Center LA (2018).

Based in Los Angeles, McDonald is an artist working with code. He has been an adjunct professor at NYU and an artist in residence at Carnegie Mellon. You can find more of his recent projects on his website and Twitter. Jongejan lives and works in New York City, where he is a creative technologist at Google Creative Lab, and previously worked in theater and television building interactive sets. He shares his work on his website and Twitter. Light Leaks was produced by Juliette Bibasse.

Installation at CLICK Festival 2013, photo by Kyle McDonald

Installation at CLICK Festival 2013, photo by Kyle McDonald

Installation at CLICK Festival 2013, photo by Kyle McDonald

Installation at CLICK Festival 2013, photo by Kyle McDonald

Installation at CLICK Festival 2013, photo by Kyle McDonald

Installation at CLICK Festival 2013, photo by Kyle McDonald

Installation at CLICK Festival 2013, photo by Kyle McDonald

Installing “Light Leaks” at La Gaîté Lyrique for the Capitaine Futur show, photo by Kyle McDonald

Installation at The Music Center LA