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Art

Swirling Networks of Sliced Paper Emerge From Altered Secondhand Books by Barbara Wildenboer

September 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Barbara Wildenboer (previously) delicately cuts and extracts the pages of old books to produce sculptural explorations of the contents inside. Thinly sliced paper fragments frame world maps found in old atlases or appear like a nervous system in an altered copy of Functional Neuroanatomy. The works are part of an ongoing project titled the Library of the Infinitesimally Small and Unimaginable Large, to which she has been contributing altered books since 2011. The series uses the site of the library as a metaphor for the larger universe, while also focusing on the decrease of printed materials as a result of the digital age.

“Through the act of altering books and other paper based objects the intention is to draw emphasis to our understanding of history as mediated through text or language and our understanding of the abstract terms of science through metaphor,” Wildenboer explains on her website.

The Cape Town-based artist sources her books and maps from secondhand bookshops and flea markets from around the world, looking specifically for publications that have illustrations, paper quality, and subject matter that might be interesting to slice and transform. This November she will open a solo exhibition at Everard Read Gallery in Johannesburg which will be followed by another solo exhibition in March 2019 at the their London location. You can see more of her paper-based sculptures and collages on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Design

A Plush Rug Recreates the Grids and Greenways of Manhattan in Colorful Wool

May 22, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

To make it a bit less exhausting to walk across New York City, South African furniture designer Ollie de Wit has recreated the island of Manhattan in a plush, colorful rug. Different pile heights are incorporated to create a sense of dimension, differentiating low-pile streets and waterways from medium-pile housing blocks and tall-pile treetops. The 2 x 3 m (approximately 6.5 x 10 feet) wool rugs are limited to an edition of 25 and are available in Shift Perspective’s online store. You can see more of the studio’s projects and design inspiration on Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Animation Design Photography

Grid Corrections: A Short Film Shows How Straight Roads Bend to Respond to Earth’s Curvature

January 31, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

That the flat Mercator projection maps we encounter in classrooms show a distorted view of our spherical planet is fairly well-known fact at this point. But the real-life application of grids on the earth takes a subtler form with the grid system of roads that defines much of the United States’ travelways. Dutch photographer and filmmaker Gerco de Ruijter created a short film called Grid Corrections that brings together dozens of aerial shots of rural roads. The film demonstrates how the grids are merged to accommodate the earth’s curvature through sharp dogleg turns every 24 miles. Grid Corrections will be screened at the Grasnapolsky music festival, which is February 2 – 4 in the town of Radio Kootwijk, The Netherlands. (via Kottke)

 

 



Art Illustration

New Bic Ballpoint Pen Portraits on Vintage Maps and Stationery by Mark Powell

September 25, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Working atop faded street maps, vintage National Geographic magazine covers, and decades-old stationery, London-based artist Mark Powell (previously) draws the wrinkled contours of his subject’s faces with a standard black Bic ballpoint pen. The weathered portraits of both famous and anonymous people reflect his antiquated canvases both in texture and tone as he traces the topographies of their faces across literal street maps or paper materials that have traversed the world. Powell’s drawings have grown in both scale and detail over the years, magnifying the impact and density of each piece. You can see more of his recent work on his website where he sells a number of prints and quite a few originals. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Art

Densely Textured Murals Reminiscent of Topographical Maps by ‘Klone’

August 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

As part of an ongoing body of work titled Personal Topography, artist Klone has painted murals around the world in this distinct, striped style. The paintings of creatures and people are meant as a visual metaphor for the ways in which personalities and inner identities differ. “The series explores both the way each [person] and other creatures have their own topography, represented by the topographical lines,” Klone shares with Colossal. “The simplicity of colour limitations provides the idea in a direct approach and there is a constant attempt to work with the surface and not necessarily make it disappear, so the wall stays a wall and a building is still the building.”

The works seen here went up in Canada, the United States, Poland, Norway, Ukraine and Israel over the last year. Klone was born in Ukraine and now lives and works in Tel Aviv. You can see more of his work on his website and on Instagram.

 

 



Design History

The Roman Empire’s 250,000 Miles of Roadways Imagined as a Subway Transit Map

June 12, 2017

Christopher Jobson

University of Chicago sophomore Sasha Trubetskoy spent a few weeks designing this amazing subway-style transit map of all the roads in the Roman Empire circa 125 AD. As Kottke notes, Rome constructed 250,000 miles of roads starting in 300 BC—over 50,000 miles of which were paved with stone—linking a total of 113 provinces from Spain to modern day Britain to the northern tip of Africa.

Trubetskoy pulled data from numerous sources, but took liberties where the history is fuzzy. “The biggest creative element was choosing which roads and cities to include, and which to exclude,” he shares. “There is no way I could include every Roman road, these are only the main ones. I tried to include cities with larger populations, or cities that were provincial capitals around the 2nd century.”

You can see the map in a bit more detail on his website, and if you donate a few bucks he’ll send you a hi-res PDF fit for printing. (via Kottke)

 

 



Animation Design

Animated Subway Maps Compared to Their Actual Geography

May 31, 2017

Christopher Jobson

New York by playhouse_animation

Designing a public transit map can be a complicated process, taking months if not years to create a concise layout that can be interpreted quickly for commuters on the go. To make things easier to understand the obvious decision is to use symbolic geography in lieu of real maps so that everything fits in a legible manner. Over at the subreddit r/DataIsBeautiful, Reddit user vinnivinnivinni had thew idea to create an animated comparison of a Berlin subway map compared to its real geography. The post went viral and several other users chimed in with their own contributions. Gathered here are some of the best examples, but you can see a few more on Twisted Sifter (gotta love Austin).

Berlin by vinnivinnivinni

Tokyo by -Ninja-

Singapore by wrcyn

Shanghai by KailoB6

São Paulo by sweedishfishoreo

Washington D.C. by stupidgit

Oslo by iamthedestroyer

Montreal by weilian82

 

 

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