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Art

Crouched and Posed Figures Formed From Hundreds of Welded Bike Chains

October 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

“Anguish” (2018), 303 Stainless chain, 58 x 95 x 87 (h) cm

Young-Deok Seo (previously here and here) produces life-size figures welded from hundreds of folded bike chains. To create these works he first begins with a sketch, which he then digitizes to create a 3D model. Next he creates a full-scale rendition from clay, which serves as both his foundation and mold for the welded chains. Despite the many bends and curves of the chains’ hinges, the final forms perfectly outline the intricate details of human ears, torsos, and hands. The Korean artist as an upcoming solo exhibition curated by Liquid Art System at Abbazia della Misericordia in from late March to mid-April 2019. You can see more of his figurative sculptures on Instagram and Facebook.

"Anguish" (2018), 255 Iron chain, 92 x 63 x 67 (h) cm, all images provided by Young-Deok Seo

“Anguish” (2018), 255 Iron chain, 92 x 63 x 67 (h) cm, all images provided by Young-Deok Seo

"Anguish" (2018), 255 Iron chain, 92 x 63 x 67 (h) cm

“Anguish” (2018), 255 Iron chain, 92 x 63 x 67 (h) cm

"Anguish" (detail) (2018), 303 Stainless chain, 58 x 95 x 87 (h) cm

“Anguish” (detail) (2018), 303 Stainless chain, 58 x 95 x 87 (h) cm

"Meditation" (2018), 626 Stainless chain, 135 x 120 x 200 (h) cm

“Meditation” (2018), 626 Stainless chain, 135 x 120 x 200 (h) cm

"Nirvana" (2018), 180 Stainless chain, 48 x 97 x 92 (h) cm

“Nirvana” (2018), 180 Stainless chain, 48 x 97 x 92 (h) cm

"Nirvana" (detail) (2018), 180 Stainless chain, 48 x 97 x 92 (h) cm

“Nirvana” (detail) (2018), 180 Stainless chain, 48 x 97 x 92 (h) cm

"Meditation" (2018), 187 Iron chain, 84 x 50 x 110 (h) cm

“Meditation” (2018), 187 Iron chain, 84 x 50 x 110 (h) cm

 

 



Art

Garment-Like Sculptures by Susie MacMurray Explore Perceptions of Female Identity

September 24, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Chain mail, needles, and dishwashing gloves: though not the materials you’d expect a dress to be made from, British artist Susie MacMurray uses them in her garment-inspired sculptures. MacMurray’s first piece in this body of work was Gladrags, made in 2002 from 10,000 pink balloons. Since then, the artist has produced several other seemingly wearable sculptures including Medusa (copper chain mail), Widow (leather and 100,000 dressmaker needles), and A Mixture of Frailties (1,400 household gloves).

“They have all been more concerned with the perception of women, their power and their vulnerabilities,” she explains to Colossal. “I am interested in how human strengths and frailties can often be one and the same thing. I suppose you could almost call them portraits… Much of my sculpture and drawing practice is concerned in one way or another with the perception and negotiation of female identity, both internal and external.”

MacMurray was formerly a classical musician, and she retrained as an artist, graduating in 2001 with an MA in Fine Art. In addition to her garment sculptures, MacMurray also creates drawings and architectural installations. You can see more of her work on her website and Twitter. (via #WomensArt)

 

 



Amazing Design Food

Watch How Steel Ribbons Are Shaped into Cookie Cutters

September 12, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

CookieCutter.com makes and sells exactly what you think they do. The Missouri-based company uses a combination of hydraulic and hand-operated machines to shape steel ribbons into classic shapes like gingerbread men, along with more complicated designs like deer and even the Statue of Liberty. The methodical push and pull of the shaping devices makes for great visual fodder, and CookieCutter.com frequently shares their process videos on Instagram and Facebook.

 

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Art

The Coralarium: An Immersive Sculptural Installation Semi-Submerged in the Indian Ocean

July 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All photographs shared with permission of the artist Jason deCaires Taylor

The Coralarium is the newest aquatic sculpture by artist Jason deCaires Taylor (previously here and here). Built in a large developed coral lagoon in the Maldives, the semi-submerged installation is positioned so both human and marine visitors can interact with sculptural elements on the skyline, inter-tidal waterline, and seabed.

To reach the Coralarium, island guests traverse about 500 feet (150 meters) of shallow water, seascaped with underwater poplars and endemic corals. About 20 feet (6 meters) tall, the open-air stainless steel cube is designed based on natural coral structures and allows tidal water and marine life to pass through. Within the structure, which provides some refuge from the ocean’s currents, are several figurative sculptures that merge human, plant, and coral shapes, based on endemic species of the island and its surrounding reefs. Additional sculptures sit and stand atop the cube’s roof to unite the interior elements with the horizon.

The aquatic destination is accessible via small group tours led by marine biologists that are on staff at the Fairmont Maldives Sirru Fen Fushi resort. You can see more of Taylor’s work on Facebook and Instagram, and the video below shows the creation of the Coralarium. (via Web Urbanist)

 

 



Art

A Multi-Story Metallic Splash Sculpture by Pere Gifre Drops Through the Center of a Madrid Hotel

July 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

For the last 15 years artist Pere Gifre has specialized in producing water-based sculptures through a process linked to visual effects engineering. His technique transforms the natural movements of water into works imbued with its natural form, allowing the sculptures to remain “alive” despite their metal composition.

The most recent installation by the San Francisco-based artist is an 80-foot waterfall that cascades down the center of the VP Plaza España Hotel in Madrid. The metallic multi-level drip descends from the hotel’s 12th floor glass bottom pool into the atrium below with a dramatic splash. Lighting is projected onto the work, shifting the silver sculpture through several colors throughout the day.  You can see a video tour of the included installation on Youtube, and browse some of Gifre’s small-scale gastronomy-inspired pieces on his website.

 

 



Art

Tommie Smith’s Iconic Protest Salute Immortalized in Gold by Glenn Kaino

June 25, 2018

Andrew LaSane

Starting in 2013, Los Angeles-based conceptual artist Glenn Kaino has had the opportunity to meet and collaborate with a man whose act of protest had long inspired him. “Bridge” is Kaino’s 100-foot long construction featuring two hundred casts of former American track and field runner and Olympic gold medalist Tommie Smith’s arm, which he raised as a human rights salute during the National Anthem after taking gold at the 1968 Summer Olympics. Kaino’s work will be installed as a part of a larger exhibition at the High Museum in Atlanta in fall 2018. We spoke with the artist to learn more about how his collaboration with Smith came to be.

On the podium of the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico, African American medalists Tommie Smith and John Carlos went from being top-performing athletes representing the United States to legendary activists with a simple yet powerful gesture. The photograph of Smith and Carlos with their heads lowered and their leather-clad fists raised is one of the most iconic images of the 20th century, and Kaino tells Colossal that it is one that he used to have taped to the side of his iMac.

A friend of Kaino’s noticed the picture and referred to Tommie as “Coach Smith,” revealing that he knew the former athlete from his days as track coach. The friend set up the meeting, and Kaino soon found himself at Coach Smith’s home in Atlanta, watching tape of the race in slow motion as Tommie broke it down almost frame by frame. “I didn’t have a pitch,” Kaino said of the way he finally approached the topic of collaboration with the gold medalist and his wife, “but I did have an observation.” He noticed that Tommie Smith’s home was like a “time bubble,” with memorabilia and references to his career and to his most famous moment. Kaino says that as someone who was born after the salute, the image has always been symbolic, but for the Smiths it was personal. “You shook my hand with that arm, you brush your teeth with that arm,” he said to Tommie.

Through the conversation, Kaino convinced Tommie to collaborate on a project that would remove the icon (the arm) from his body and help him see the salute the way that others do. Back in Los Angeles, after experimenting with what Kaino believes to have been the arm of an Aquaman figure, they got to work casting Smith’s arm and clenched fist. He used the cast to create hundreds of fiberglass arms, which he then painted gold and hung from wires to form, according to the artist’s website, “a golden path leading forward from the present but connected to the past, a spectacular reconciliation of a historic record, an individual memory, and a public symbol all renegotiated in an infrastructure of time to creates stories of the now.”

As for connecting the past and present, it is interesting to consider Kaino’s work and Smith’s salute as it relates to Black athletes today, like Colin Kaepernick, who are criticized for publicly protesting similar issues 50 years later. Kaino tells Colossal that he is working on a documentary to tell Smith’s story that goes deeper than the one image that everyone knows. For those who want to see “Bridge” in person, the exhibition, titled With Drawn Arms: Glenn Kaino and Tommie Smith, opens in Atlanta, Georgia at the High Museum on September 29, 2018. (via Artnet)

Smith and Kaino hosted drawing workshops in educational spaces around the country where students learned the history of the event and drew frames from the momentous race.

Smith and Kaino hosted drawing workshops in educational spaces around the country where students learned the history of the event and drew frames from the momentous race.

 

 



Art

The Magnetic Force of Urs Fischer’s Life-Size Metallic Rhinoceros

May 29, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Robert McKeever. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Robert McKeever. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

Things stands poised as the singular sculpture in a new installation by Swiss artist Urs Fischer, yet like its title might suggest, the lone work is composed of several disparate parts. At the piece’s core stands a life-size aluminum copy of a rhinoceros with a magnetic presence that has attracted several man-made objects into its grand orbit. A vacuum cleaner, step stool, toilet, car door, and frying pan all cling to its wrinkled metallic skin.

The work questions one’s attraction to and use of everyday objects, considering how and what we accumulate as we move through our individualized worlds. “‘Art’ has always been a word for this thing that can’t be rationalized, when you see or hear something that you struggle to explain,” says Fischer in a press release about Things. “But that’s its strength, of course.”

The massive aluminum work is on view at a disused bank at 511 Fifth Avenue in midtown Manhattan through June 23, 2018. This installation coincides with Fischer’s exhibition of new paintings titled Sōtatsu, which also runs through June 23 at Gagosian Gallery's 980 Madison Avenue location. (via The New York Times)

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.