origami

Posts tagged
with origami



Craft

Elegant Paper Cranes Composed of Detailed Cuts, Folds, and Flowers

December 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

In 2015, paper artist Cristian Marianciuc (previously) started a 1,000-day goal to create a new paper crane each day. The extravagant designs included layers of multi-color paper, detailed cuts to imitate feathers, and often gilded elements added onto the wings. After his self-imposed challenge Marianciuc has given himself more time to work on each design, allowing cranes to develop over days rather than hours. Without these constraints he is able to vary his techniques, creating increasingly difficult works that introduce more intricate cuts and folds. Marianciuc posts his cranes regularly on Instagram, in addition to selling select paper works on Etsy. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Art

Origami Lava Pours from the Window of an Abandoned Building in Catalonia for LLUÈRNIA

November 12, 2018

Christopher Jobson

As part of the recent LLUÈRNIA festival of light and fire in Catalonia, collaborators David Oliva of SP25 Arquitectura and Anna Juncà of Atelier 4 created this spectacular flow of lava using common fortune teller origami figures. Over 10,000 folded pieces of paper were needed to create the work that was illuminated from underneath and further brought to life with smoke machines. Titled simply “Origami Lava,” the piece was affixed to an abandoned building in Olot, a town surrounded by dormant volcanoes. You can see more at SP25 Arquitectura. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Dance Photography

Life-Size Origami Becomes a Fashion Statement in Dramatic Paper Costumes Worn by Ballet Dancers

October 15, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

All photographs © Melika Dez

Montreal-based artists Melika Dez and Pauline Loctin met in January 2018 and decide to combine their imaginations in a creative collaboration. The result, PLI.Ē Project, fuses Dez’s skills as a movement photographer with Loctin’s expertise in paper art, and showcases dancers around the world wearing hand-folded paper costumes. Loctin specifically formed each dress’s shape and color palette to the dancer who would be modeling it, and Dez worked to situate her models in iconic settings from the streets of New York City to the Louvre Museum in Paris. Loctin’s paper creations range from resembling traditional ballet tutus to intricately folded experimental shapes.

Dez shares that the project came together in two phases: first as a studio shoot with professional ballet dancers wearing Loctin’s creations, and later as a worldwide endeavor photographing dancers and costumes outside. “Paper can be a fragile material to work with and that is exactly why we decided to make the impossible, possible. No matter which element we would be confronted to, water (rain), wind, we wanted to show that we are limitless.”

The PLI.Ē Project photographs are on view in Montreal through November 4, 2018, and the duo hopes to shoot a second series of the work and eventually publish a photo book. You can see more from Loctin on Instagram and Facebook and from Dez on Instagram. (via fubiz)

 

 



Colossal Design

Origami Wrap Turns Disposable Gift-Wrapping Paper Into DIY Crafts

August 16, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Fun fact: if every American wrapped just three gifts per year using reusable or reused materials, we would save enough paper to cover 45,000 football fields. And it doesn’t just have to be last week’s Sunday comics: this clever wrapping paper is the gift that keeps on giving, six times over! Each 20 x 30 inch sheet is covered with directions to turn it into a dog, frog, flower, balloon, fish, and crane. Origami Wrap is designed by ILOVEHANDLES and sold in sets of five sheets. Find it in The Colossal Shop.

 

 

 



Art

Astonishing Origami by Robby Kraft

June 5, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Designed by Robby Kraft

Brooklyn-based polymath Robby Kraft currently teaches coding to artists and designers at Parsons and the School for Poetic Computation, but his love for the connected worlds of art and math began at a young age; he started folding origami in elementary school. More recently, Kraft was introduced to the algorithmic aspects of origami. Around 2013, he began to learn more through Erik Demaine’s origami lectures at MIT, and Robert Lang’s books. In addition to folding increasingly intricate works designed by others in the origami community, about two years ago Kraft started using algorithmic code to design new origami patterns.

Kraft is also a classical musician, and describes the similarity between sheet music and origami: “the crease pattern and diagrams are instructions on a mathematically flat 2D manifold, impossible in the real world, so to fold an origami is to capture it into the real world and add imperfections.” Kraft is working on releasing the code he created to the public, and he shares with Colossal that in the future he hopes to publish a book on origami design. You can follow his work on Instagram and Twitter.

Designed by Brian Chan

Designed by Jun Mitani

Design credits clockwise from top left: Bernie Peyton, Pham Dieu Huy, Beth Johnson, H.T. Quyet

Designed by Roman Diaz

Designed by Robby Kraft

Designed by Tom Hull

Designed by Yutaka Naito

Designed by Fumiaki Kawahata

 

 



Craft

Elaborate Paper Origami Tessellations and Kusudamas by Ekaterina Lukasheva

February 21, 2018

Christopher Jobson

Moscow-based paper artist Ekaterina Lukasheva first tried folding paper at the age of 14 when a mathematics professor brought in a book on kusudamas. The traditional paper sphere technique requires an understanding of geometry to ensure the individual units fit together perfectly with the help of glue or string. A few years later she began to explore much more complicated designs like tessellations, aided by a university degree in mathematics and programming. Through her experimentation and commitment Lukasheva has become so proficient with paper that she’s authored several DIY books featuring some of her original designs. You can follow more of her work on Flickr and Instagram. (via Twisted Sifter)

 

 



Art Craft Food

Japanese Tip: An Exhibition of 8,000 Chopstick Sleeve Sculptures Left Behind at Restaurants

December 19, 2017

Johnny Waldman

Yuki Tatsumi was working as a waiter in a restaurant when one day, as he was cleaning up a table, he noticed that a customer had intricately folded up the paper chopstick sleeve and left it behind. Japan doesn’t have a culture of tipping but Tatsumi imagined that this was a discreet, subconscious method of showing appreciation. He began paying attention and sure enough noticed that other customers were doing the same thing. Tatsumi began collecting these “tips” which eventually led to his art project: Japanese Tip.

Since 2012, Tatsumi has not only been collecting his own tips but he’s reached out to restaurants and eateries all across Japan communicating his concept and asking them to send him their tips. The response has been enormous. He’s collected over 13,000 paper sculptures that range from obscure and ugly to intricate and elaborate.

left at a restaurant in Kochi

Earlier this month, Tatsumi staged an exhibition in Tokyo where he displayed 8,000 of some of the most interesting sculptures sourced from all 47 prefectures around Japan. “Japanese Tip is a project between restaurants and customers,” says Tatsumi, “to communicate the ‘appreciation for food’ and ‘appreciation of the service’ by using the most common material used at any Japanese restaurant.”

The exhibition has since closed but you can see some of the paper sculptures on his website and you can follow the initiative on Facebook. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

left at a cafe in Mie