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Art

Animals and Statues Serve as the Protagonists of Startlingly Realistic Post-Apocalyptic Paintings by Josh Keyes

October 16, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

“Landfall” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30" × 20"

“Landfall” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30″ × 20″

Portland-based artist Josh Keyes (previously) paints hyperrealistic depictions of what he perceives the world might look like after the fall of humans. Animals such as sharks, tigers, and bulls remain as the final witnesses to the aftermath of human destruction—observing blazing fires, investigating displaced commercial objects, and swimming amongst melted ice caps. Monuments and statues also remain in this post-apocalyptic world, like in the artist’s recent painting Siren, which observes a graffiti-covered angel with a horn being splashed with the ocean’s high tide. Keyes’s solo exhibition Tempest opens on October 13, 2018 and runs through November 3, 2018 at Thinkspace Projects in Los Angeles. You can see more of his paintings on his Instagram and website. (via Supersonic Art)

“Siren” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30" × 24"

“Siren” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30″ × 24″

“End Zone” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30" × 20"

“End Zone” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30″ × 20″

“The Meadow” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 24″ × 19″

“Ascent” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 24″ × 19″

“Stairway To Heaven”(2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30" × 20"

“Stairway To Heaven”(2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30″ × 20″

 

 



Art History

A Neoclassical Girl Towers Over Memphis in a Seven-Story Wheatpaste by Julien de Casabianca

October 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Julien de Casabianca (previously) is known for wheatpasting subjects from famous paintings onto public infrastructure as part of his ongoing Outings Project. Last month the French artist was invited to present a monumental installation at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in Tennessee alongside an exhibition and workshop. De Casabianca’s seven-story mural features a melancholic girl pulled from William-Adolphe Bouguereau’s 1886 neoclassical painting “Au pied de la falaise,” which is included in the museum’s collection.

Like his previous interventions, de Casabianca wanted to give the subject a new home, while also liberating her from the structure of the painting’s frame. In her new position she gazes out over the city, surveying the landscape from the building’s fire escape. The work is part of Brooks Outside, a recent curatorial program that presents outdoor installations around the institution’s grounds and city. You can see de Casabianca’s new work at 62 E.H. Crump Blvd through November 2018 as weather permits, and follow his travels on Instagram. (via Brooklyn Street Art)

 

 



Art

Nearly 50 Artists Descend on a 19th-Century Convent in Catalonia During the Creença Art Residency

October 9, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

Ernest Zacharevic / All photos courtesy Vinny Cornelli, Streetlayers

This past July and August, the Creença Art Residency hosted an ambitious, multi-artist project an hour outside of Barcelona. Initiated and curated by Void Projects, a new platform created by artist Axel Void, and organized in collaboration with Elsa Guerra, Jofre Oliveras and Charlotte Pyatt, the project hosted some 50 multidisciplinary artists from across the globe to create in situ work associated with the theme of Creença, or “belief.”

Artists were invited to present their interpretation of the subject from a personal, religious, or epistemological perspective inside Konvent, a former 19th-century convent in the town of Cal Rosal. Although once home to a bustling textile industry, the location is now practically abandoned. Despite its lack of resources, the location turns out to be the perfect setting for what organizers had in mind—a creative community living and working together under one roof.

The building’s faded hallways and bare rooms were transformed into studios and sleeping dorms for guests during the summer event. The close proximity of daily life and creation made the entire setting feel particularly motivating and inspiring, and pushed all the participants to create exceptional examples of their diverse practices. The location also provided a perfect opportunity for spontaneous collaboration, which occurred both on-site with paintings, sculptures, and drawings, and with installations within the ruins of a crumbling textile factory next door.

After hosting local and national artists for two months, Konvent opened its doors to the public for a three-day exhibition. The show was a mix between a massive group exhibition and an open studio event, which provided guests insight into the process behind the varied works. To celebrate the collaborative spirit nurtured during the residency, a sister exhibition opened at Montana Gallery in Barcelona early last month. You can learn more about Konvent and its recent collaborative projects on their website and Instagram. All photos by Vinny Cornelli unless otherwise noted.

Jofre Oliveras and Stefan Krische

Isaac Cordal

Amaya Suberviola

Axel Void

L.E.O.

Axel Void

BOICUT

 

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Art

Extraordinary Pigeons Take Flight in Large-Scale Feathery Murals by Adele Renault

September 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Adele Renault (previously) paints realistic portraits of the common pigeon, often highlighting real examples of pigeons whose stories are anything but ordinary. This year she painted a mural of “Baby Girl,” a New Jersey pigeon who won a 366 mile race 19 minutes ahead of the other feathered contestants. A few years ago she dedicated a series of smaller paintings to “Camp,” a pigeon adopted by a Chicago couple after finding his egg left on their kitchen table.

By focusing on these inspiring stories, Renault highlights the often overlooked bird as a magnificent creature rather than an urban nuisance. Her brightly hued public murals and paintings on canvas bring purples and blues into the bird’s feathers, and accentuate the iridescent tones one might not notice at first glance. Recently she published a book combining her avian works titled Feathers and Faces. You can view more of her large-scale paintings on her website and Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Art

Flipped Perspectives Explored in New Intimate Paintings by Cinta Vidal

September 12, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"On Chairs," Acrylic on wood, 32 x 32 cm

“On Chairs,” Acrylic on wood, 32 x 32 cm

Barcelona-based artist Cinta Vidal has previously produced fictionalized architectural paintings that study how individuals with differing perspectives can view and inhabit the same world. Vidal crafts her visual metaphors by placing subjects onto floating islands, presenting each with a different vantage point depending on their chosen location. In her newer series of works, Vidal focuses more intently on intimate relationships, populating her suspended clusters of furniture, animals, and household objects with only two or three individuals rather than a larger population.

Her Couples series places pairs of characters in opposition to each other, exaggerating her previous explorations of human understanding. In these works two male figures sit back-to-back as they type on their own laptops, a woman peers longingly from an armchair as a man stands facing the opposite direction below her chair, and a boy photographer and woman stare at the same scene, but from flipped perspectives. These works show how two people might hold differing ideals, despite occupying the same community or household.

The included paintings will be presented alongside a mural in Vidal’s upcoming solo exhibition Viewpoints at Thinkspace Projects in Los Angeles from September 15 through October 6, 2018. You can view more of the artist’s gravity-defying works on her website and Instagram.

"Outing," Oil on wood panel, 55 x 55 cm

“Outing,” Oil on wood panel, 55 x 55 cm

"Working," Acrylic on wood, 20 x 32 cm

“Working,” Acrylic on wood, 20 x 32 cm

"Couple 4," Acrylic on wood, 13.4 x 32 cm (L) and "Couple 3," Acrylic on wood, 13.6 x 32 cm (R)

“Couple 4,” Acrylic on wood, 13.4 x 32 cm (L) and “Couple 3,” Acrylic on wood, 13.6 x 32 cm (R)

"Four Cats Three Kids," Acrylic on wood, 35 x 50 cm

“Four Cats Three Kids,” Acrylic on wood, 35 x 50 cm

"Living Together," Acrylic on wood, 63.5 x 50 cm

“Living Together,” Acrylic on wood, 63.5 x 50 cm

"Couple 2," Acrylic on wood, 11.2 x 32 cm

“Couple 2,” Acrylic on wood, 11.2 x 32 cm

"Coworking," Oil on wood panel, 80 x 80 cm

“Coworking,” Oil on wood panel, 80 x 80 cm

"Caravan," Oil on wood, 36 x 36 cm

“Caravan,” Oil on wood, 36 x 36 cm

 

 



Art

Colorful Brushstrokes Digitally Sculpted into Figural Compositions by Matthew Stone

September 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

“Being Reliant, Not Being Reliant, Being Not Reliant” (2016), Digital print and acrylic on linen, 71 x 47 inches

“Being Reliant, Not Being Reliant, Being Not Reliant” (2016), Digital print and acrylic on linen, 71 x 47 inches

Matthew Stone explores the figure through a combination of painting and digital manipulation, presenting segmented busts and bodies splayed out in abstracted three-dimensional spaces. After painting a series of individual brushstrokes, Stone photographs the gestures and sculpts them around digital figures using several software programs. The wrapped figures hover, twist, and contort above embedded shadows which give the illusion of depth. The final scenes are then printed onto raw linen. These digital paintings were presented as part of Stone’s recent solo exhibition Healing With Wounds at Somerset House in London, which closed in late August. You can see more of his work on his website and Instagram.

“Noble Intentions”, Digital print and acrylic on linen, 47 x 35 inches

“Noble Intentions”, Digital print and acrylic on linen, 47 x 35 inches

“Fear of Not Being Needed” (2016), Digital print and acrylic on linen, 98 x 130 inches

“Fear of Not Being Needed” (2016), Digital print and acrylic on linen, 98 x 130 inches

“Freedom/Optimism” (2016), Digital print and acrylic on linen, 47 x 35 inches

“Freedom/Optimism” (2016), Digital print and acrylic on linen, 47 x 35 inches

“Healing With Wounds” (2016), Digital print and acrylic on linen, 47 x 35 inches

“Healing With Wounds” (2016), Digital print and acrylic on linen, 47 x 35 inches

“Don’t Leave Me” (2016), Digital print and acrylic on linen, 63 x 47 inches

“Don’t Leave Me” (2016), Digital print and acrylic on linen, 63 x 47 inches

“Accusatory (Upper Chest)” (2016), Digital print and acrylic on linen, 71 x 47 inches

“Accusatory (Upper Chest)” (2016), Digital print and acrylic on linen, 71 x 47 inches

 

 



Art

New Fictional Self-Help Titles Present Existential Messages on Faded Book Covers

August 24, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Johan Deckmann (previously) presents existential notions of life, love, and self-doubt as self-help titles on hand-painted books. The fictionalized novels contain no words on their pages, however their size often directly correlates to the messages on the front covers, such as his series of blue books, which read “Good ideas” on the smallest, “Mediocre ideas” on the mid-sized work, and “Bad ideas,” on the largest.

The Copenhagen-based artist is also a practicing psychotherapist who recognizes how language can be a powerful tool in both art and therapy. “The right words can be like good medicine,” he explained in a statement for the Faurschou Foundation in Copenhagen. His chosen phrases are both humorous and wise, often cutting to a deep truth with just a handful of words like his title “How to search forever for what is already inside.”

In addition to books, Deckmann also paints poignant messages on record sleeves, wooden boxes, and briefcases. He recently had an exhibition at the Arp Museum in Remagen, Germany titled “It Takes Time, It’s Risky and It Might Last Forever” which closed in mid-July. You can see more of his works on his website and Instagram.