panoramic

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Photography

Neon Lights and Urban Loneliness Shroud Cities After Dark in Liam Wong's Panoramic Photo Book

October 1, 2021

Grace Ebert

All images courtesy of Volume Co., shared with permission

The foundational idea behind Liam Wong’s new book is that “real life is just as potent, bizarre, and interesting as things we can imagine.” Released by the crowd-sourced publisher Volume, After Dark is a follow-up to the Edinburgh-born photographer’s first monograph, TO: KY: OO, which captured the empty Japanese streets under the glow of neon lights. Now Wong similarly documents city life with his signature cinematic style, although he ventures beyond Tokyo to unveil the nightlife of Osaka, Kyoto, London, Seoul, Paris, and Rome in wide, gleaming panoramas.

The 176-page book pinpoints instances of urban solitude and reveals a universal sense of loneliness that falls on a city when most of its residents are asleep. Wong (previously) tends to frame temporarily abandoned pockets of a business district or bustling neighborhood that will likely be chaotic with passersby in a few hours, giving his shots a futuristic bent that’s more evocative of a cybernetic video game than typical street photography. After Dark captures “the eerie emptiness of London’s Piccadilly Circus at 4:00 a.m., Seoul’s late-night taxi drivers moving along hushed roads, two birds sharing the warmth of neon sign in Hong Kong’s TSM District, and a salaryman waiting on an empty subway platform in Tokyo’s Akihabara district,” a statement says.

Signed and collector’s editions of After Dark, including one packaged with print, are available to fund now on Volume’s site. You also can purchase prints in Wong’s shop, and find more of his photos on Instagram. (via It’s Nice That)

 

 

 



Photography

A Stellar Panorama Frames the Milky Way and Other Celestial Bodies Through a Snowy Forest in Poland

February 17, 2021

Grace Ebert

Image © Łukasz Żak, shared with permission

On a cold night at the end of January, astrophotographer Łukasz Żak traveled about 150 kilometers from his home in Wołomin near Warsaw to a rural region in northeastern Poland. Near the village of Siemiony, he ventured into -12 degree cold to snap a remarkable set of images that feature a trio of celestial bodies peeking through snow-heavy spruces. After stitching the individual photographs together, he created this stereographic projection that frames the nebulae of the Milky Way, with one of the brightest stars, Capella, at the center and Orion to the upper right.

Żak shares that the composition was only apparent for an hour before the moon illuminated the sky and marred visibility. He describes the experience:

Being in such places, I already know why winter fairy tales and fairy tales were created…The road runs almost exactly from south to north. Such a trail destination majestically presents the Cosmic hunter in the southern skies, the Mythological Orion. Orion rises above the forest, showing its nebular treasures. A seasoned eye will notice the structures of the winter Milky Way and many other constellations.

You can follow a wide range of Żak’s celestial photographs and projections on Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Photography

Panoramic Photographs by Peter Li Bring an Otherworldly Perspective to the Architectural Symmetry of Churches

January 3, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"Cocoon," all images courtesy of Peter Li

“Cocoon,” all images courtesy of Peter Li

Photographer Peter Li uses panoramic photography to introduce a new perspective to the already breathtaking architecture of churches from around the world. By capturing the entirety of the ceiling and supporting columns, Li allows the viewer to get the chance to feel what it is like to stand at the center of these grand buildings, while also achieving a viewpoint that is impossible to get without digital intervention.

One of the many stand-out aspects of the photographs is the symmetry that is highlighted when a chapel’s interior is stretched. This element, Li tells Colossal, is what gives the composition its overall balance. Lighting factors and the season are also a key parts that make a panorama more compelling to shoot. Shapes and shadows appear differently in each space depending on where the sun might be overhead, and when in a certain position, this can be quite disruptive to the photograph.

When all elements fall into place however, Lee achieves photographs that are truly transportive. His images not only take us to a different place in the world, but also allow us to be slightly removed from our known reality. “Observing a three-dimensional space in its entirety gives us a view/perspective beyond what the eye can see,” he explains. “It breaks us from reality, plays with our perception of shape and form and creates a sense of another world. Through my photography, I hope to impart the otherworldly nature to the viewer, encouraging them to take a momentary step out of their reality.”

Li is in the process of making his high resolution panoramas available to the public in the form of large, wall-sized prints. Keep up-to-date with these prints, and new images from the photographer, on his website and Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

"Dynasty"

“Dynasty”

"Hephaestus"

“Hephaestus”

"Confetti"

“Confetti”

Jack Frost

Jack Frost

"Hyrule"

“Hyrule”

"Crossbow"

“Crossbow”     

"St. Paul's, Dome"

“St. Paul’s, Dome”

 

 



Art

New 360-Degree Immersive Drawing Created With 120 Marker Pens by Oscar Oiwa

April 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

For his latest immersive installation, Oscar Oiwa (previously) created a 360-degree black and white drawing that fills the space of an inflatable vinyl balloon. The work, Oscar Oiwa in Paradise – Drawing the Ephemeral, took Oiwa and his five assistants two weeks and 120 marker pens to create. Visitors are invited to enter the encapsulating drawing to fully experience Oiwa’s imagined environment, which is composed of dark patches of forest, winding pathways, and a sky filled with high-contrast swirls.

“I’ve always enjoyed drawing, which I consider the most basic way of expressing myself visually,” said Oiwa in a press release regarding the large-scale work. “A pencil and a blank sheet— there is no simpler medium than that.”

The exhibition is presented at JAPAN HOUSE São Paulo, a venue that showcases traditional Japanese culture through a modern lens. Drawing the Ephemeral runs through June 3, 2018. You can watch the making of the massive drawing in the short video below.

 

 

 



Photography

A Panoramic Full Eclipse Composite with Star Trails Captured by Stephane Vetter

August 30, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Photograph © Stephane Vetter

In this beautifully rendered “little planet” image, photographer Stephane Vetter fuses both night and day captured from a single location at Magone Lake in Oregon during the August 21st solar eclipse. The shot required tons of careful planning, and here’s an explanation of how he did it via Astronomy Picture of the Day:

This featured little-planet, all-sky, double time-lapse, digitally-fused composite captured celestial action during both night and day from a single location. In this 360×180 panorama, north and south are at the image bottom and top, while east and west are at the left and right edges, respectively. During four hours the night before the eclipse, star trails were captured circling the north celestial pole (bottom) as the Earth spun. During the day of the total eclipse, the Sun was captured every fifteen minutes from sunrise to sunset (top), sometimes in partial eclipse. All of these images were then digitally merged onto a single image taken exactly during the total solar eclipse. Then, the Sun’s bright corona could be seen flaring around the dark new Moon (upper left), while Venus simultaneously became easily visible (top). The tree in the middle, below the camera, is a Douglas fir.

So, just your typical full eclipse, little-planet, all-sky, double time-lapse photo by a fir tree, really. You can see more of Vetter’s photography on his website.

 

 



Illustration

New Panoramic Coffee Cup Illustrations by Adrian Hogan

June 2, 2016

Christopher Jobson

A video posted by Adrian Hogan (@adehogan) on

Illustrator Adrian Hogan (previously) continues to document the world around him in these detailed panoramic coffee cup sketches which he draws and shares on Instagram in these fun videos. Whether sitting in the coffee shop itself or out and about around his home in Tokyo, he incorporates buildings, streets, friends, and the minutiae of everyday life as he works his way around the edge of each cup. Hogan works as a commercial illustrator, bringing his sketchbook style to storefronts, Japanese magazines, and other editorial projects. You can find more of his work and an interview over on Mas Context.

A video posted by Adrian Hogan (@adehogan) on

A video posted by Adrian Hogan (@adehogan) on

A video posted by Adrian Hogan (@adehogan) on

A video posted by Adrian Hogan (@adehogan) on