paper

Posts tagged
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Animation

A Gardener Spreads Joy Through the Cultivation of Lemon Trees in a New Animated Short

November 21, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Laymun is a collaborative short film by directors Catherine Prowse (previously) and Hannah Quinn which follows the story of a gardener in a Middle Eastern war zone. The woman cultivates and spreads lemon trees as a way to bring hope to herself and community. The sets for the film were crafted from crumpled and sculpted paper over the course of six months, and the cut-out paper characters were scanned and added in digitally after the shoot. The directors chose this medium as a way to more accurately depict the tone they wished to bring across in their film.

“It was really important to us not to sentimentalize the ongoing violence in the Middle East and to communicate the precariousness of our character’s situation,” explain Prowse and Quinn. “So we explored the qualities of paper as a medium, crumpling and tearing to create a sense of fragility and vulnerability.”

The animated short has won several awards including the Royal Television Society Undergraduate Animation Award 2018, the International Animation prize at the Cardiff Mini Film Festival 2018, and the Short Film Prize at the World of Women Film Fair Middle East, among many others. You can see more of Prowse’s work on Vimeo and website in addition to Quinn’s work on her website. (via Short of the Week)

 

 

 



Amazing Design

Handmade Paper Toys by Haruki Nakamura Spring, Fold, and Jump into Action

November 16, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Japanese paper engineer Haruki Nakamura (previously) continues to design delightful toys using simple materials. A friendly armadillo curls into a self-protective ball at the touch of a finger, and a sleepy boy emerges, ready to sleepwalk, in “Astral Projection.” Nakamura uses rubber bands and carefully held points of paper tension to spark the jumpy movements of his characters, and sells kits so you can make your own endless entertainment. The artist only sells within Japan on his website, but this Penguin Bomb toy is available on Amazon.

 

 



Art

Origami Lava Pours from the Window of an Abandoned Building in Catalonia for LLUÈRNIA

November 12, 2018

Christopher Jobson

As part of the recent LLUÈRNIA festival of light and fire in Catalonia, collaborators David Oliva of SP25 Arquitectura and Anna Juncà of Atelier 4 created this spectacular flow of lava using common fortune teller origami figures. Over 10,000 folded pieces of paper were needed to create the work that was illuminated from underneath and further brought to life with smoke machines. Titled simply “Origami Lava,” the piece was affixed to an abandoned building in Olot, a town surrounded by dormant volcanoes. You can see more at SP25 Arquitectura. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

Moonlit Owls, Tigers, and Dragons Set Against Ethereal Backgrounds in Paintings by Takashi Kanazawa

November 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Japanese artist Takashi Kanazawa paints animals such as tigers, owls, cranes, and dragons set against minimal backdrops which are lit by large waning moons. The scenes are painted on washi paper, a Japanese material produced by hand with local fiber, and are a twist on traditional Japanese painting, or Nihonga. The term was established near the turn of the 19th-century when Western oil painting became popularized in Japan, and refers to the traditional painting materials, techniques, and subjects rooted deeply in Japan’s art history.

Kanazawa’s work was recently included in the group exhibition NIHONGA: Contemporary Art of JapanSEIZAN Gallery‘s inaugural show in their New York City location. The exhibition brought together seven painters who reinterpret traditional Japanese art techniques through a contemporary lens. You can see more of Kanazawa’s painting on SEIZAN Gallery’s website.

 

 



Art

Mountain Ranges and Beehive Structures Inspire Amy Genser’s Intricate Rolled Paper Sculptures

November 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

“Lunar Spin” (2016), Paper, copper, brass, aluminum and acrylic on canvas, 78 inch diameter, all images via Amy Genser

Connecticut-based Amy Genser (previously) uses rolled paper and acrylic paint to create topographic explorations of rocky and oceanic landscapes. Her sculptures reference natural forms and creatures such as barnacles, the tubular formation of beehives, and the way water travels and flows through Earth’s oceans. The works are also inspired by macro and micro depictions of nature, like cellular processes or a satellite images of a mountainous terrain.

Recently Genser has begun making multi-part pieces that allow her to work more sculpturally. She will present her rolled paper landscapes in the upcoming group exhibition Common Ground opening at Amy Simon Fine Art in Westport, Connecticut on November 3, 2018 and running through December 31, 2018. You can see more of her work on her website, Facebook, and Instagram.

“Black and White Squares” (2018), Paper and acrylic on masonite, 42 x 42 x 3 inches

"Black and White Squares" (2018), Paper and acrylic on masonite, 42 x 42 x 3 inches, all images via Amy Genser

“Black and White Squares”,  detail (2018), Paper and acrylic on masonite, 42 x 42 x 3 inches

"Collecting Pebbles" (2017), Paper and acrylic on canvas, 20 x 30 x 4 inches

“Collecting Pebbles” (2017), Paper and acrylic on canvas, 20 x 30 x 4 inches

"Black and White Squares" (2018), Paper and acrylic on masonite, 42 x 42 x 3 inches

“Black and White Squares” (2018), Paper and acrylic on masonite, 42 x 42 x 3 inches

"Aquatic Interstellar Dream" (2018), Paper, acrylic, copper on canvas

“Aquatic Interstellar Dream” (2018), Paper, acrylic, copper on canvas

"Black and White Squares" (2018), Paper and acrylic on masonite, 42 x 42 x 3 inches, all images via Amy Genser

“Black and White Squares” (2018), Paper and acrylic on masonite, 42 x 42 x 3 inches, all images via Amy Genser

"The Not So Itsy Bitsy Spider" (2017), Paper and acrylic on canvas, 65" x 35”

“The Not So Itsy Bitsy Spider” (2017), Paper and acrylic on canvas, 65″ x 35”

 

 



Art Dance Photography

Life-Size Origami Becomes a Fashion Statement in Dramatic Paper Costumes Worn by Ballet Dancers

October 15, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

All photographs © Melika Dez

Montreal-based artists Melika Dez and Pauline Loctin met in January 2018 and decide to combine their imaginations in a creative collaboration. The result, PLI.Ē Project, fuses Dez’s skills as a movement photographer with Loctin’s expertise in paper art, and showcases dancers around the world wearing hand-folded paper costumes. Loctin specifically formed each dress’s shape and color palette to the dancer who would be modeling it, and Dez worked to situate her models in iconic settings from the streets of New York City to the Louvre Museum in Paris. Loctin’s paper creations range from resembling traditional ballet tutus to intricately folded experimental shapes.

Dez shares that the project came together in two phases: first as a studio shoot with professional ballet dancers wearing Loctin’s creations, and later as a worldwide endeavor photographing dancers and costumes outside. “Paper can be a fragile material to work with and that is exactly why we decided to make the impossible, possible. No matter which element we would be confronted to, water (rain), wind, we wanted to show that we are limitless.”

The PLI.Ē Project photographs are on view in Montreal through November 4, 2018, and the duo hopes to shoot a second series of the work and eventually publish a photo book. You can see more from Loctin on Instagram and Facebook and from Dez on Instagram. (via fubiz)

 

 



Design

26 Paper Engineers From Around the World Turned the Alphabet Into a Limited Edition Book

October 10, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Kelli Anderson

The Movable Books Society, a non-profit organization of pop-up book professionals and enthusiasts, recently released a collection of pop-up cards dedicated to the alphabet. The letter-filled tome, titled A to Z: Marvels in Paper Engineering, features designs from 26 paper engineers and celebrates the Society’s 25-year history. Each card is consistent in size, measuring six by eight inches, but features strikingly different designs from a wide array of paper-focused designers.

Included are the strong graphic sensibility of Kelli Anderson (previously), Hiromi Takeda’s delicate ode to flowers, and a supernova “S” by Isabel Uria, an Ecuadorian artist who also designed the clamshell box. In addition to each letter folio that includes a description of its artist’s inspiration, the compendium comes with a history of The Movable Book Society by Ann Montanaro Staples and an introductory essay by Larry Seidman. A to Z is limited to 2,000 copies and is available for pre-order on the Society’s website.

Update: Filmmaker Christopher Helkey recently released a mini-documentary of all 26 designers opening and explaining their letters, which is now embedded below.

Yevgeniya Yeretskaya

Isabel Uria

Hiromi Takeda

Yoojin Kim

Maike Biederstaedt

Eric Broekhuis

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Sailing Ship Kite