pattern

Posts tagged
with pattern



Art

Symmetric Drawings on Antique Ledgers Balance Energy and Consciousness

August 23, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Mantra Amplifier/Deep Listening Device. The feeling of humming at the heart. This is a story of the song the bee sings to the morning glory and the humming inside the bee-eater” (2022), 150 x 100 centimeters. All images Tanya P. Johnson, shared with permission

Conveying the “texture of a threshold,” the mixed-media drawings that comprise Tanya P. Johnson’s ongoing Wisdom Engines series invoke passing between wakefulness and sleep or life and death. Mirrored renderings entwine gears, levers, pulleys, and audio equipment with flowers and geometric motifs in elongated columns, referencing the shape of the human spine. The bisected works reflect both a connection between entities and finding balance through somatic experiences and symmetries.

Drawn on vintage ledger paper, the pieces are “tools for consciousness hacking,” Johnson says, instruments for confronting the systems we’re accustomed to. Each work “generates subtle awareness, cultivates wisdom, and wicks fear. They symbolize the ways movement and breath can be used to interrupt patterns, to strengthen electromagnetism, and to stabilize energy.”

Living between British Columbia and her native Cape Town, Johnson works across media, and you can find more of her projects on her site and Instagram.

 

“Boundlessness/The Four Immeasurables. Technology of (a) mantra, a vector” (2020), 100 x 72 centimeters

“Wisdom Engine. Leveraging gravity to create awareness of awareness. A page from the guidebook” (2021), 150 x 100 centimeters

“Whale prana and the Flaming World Tree. A visual pulse of wicking fear from the planet.  A story that includes the twin Seed Keeper girls, Whale as Time Keeper and the bendy nature of time.  It is simultaneously an architectural-cartography of Maha Bandha” (2022), 150 x 100 centimeters

“Folding Time. Art in the time of Corona. A consciousness map of eternal now” (2020), 100 x 72 centimeters

“Morning Call. Technology of (a) mantra, a vector” (2020),100  x 72 centimeters

“Texture of threshold. The awareness in my mouth of electromagnetic transformation” (2021), 150 x 100 centimeters

“Making Radiance/Evolute1, a screenshot. Mechanics of aligning and organizing life force in the vessel” (2021),100 x 72 centimeters

 

 



Craft

Painted with Mesmerizing Precision, Innumerable Dots Cloak Stones in Hypnotic Patterns

August 8, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Elspeth McLean, shared with permission

Concentric circles in bold gradients, spiraling lines, and bright radial motifs by Australian-Canadian artist Elspeth McLean transform stones into endlessly hypnotic designs. Impeccably arranged on the flat, round objects, the patterns are comprised of countless individual dots in varying sizes and hues. Having veered away from the stippling technique she used in her earlier paintings, McLean refers to her style as “dotillism,” which is similar to pointillism in the shapes it relies on, although the artist prefers to work with exact colors rather than layer them to produce an illusion of specific tones.

McLean’s stones sell out quickly, so keep an eye on her Instagram for shop updates.

 

 

 



Animation

Kinetic Actions Trigger Mesmerizing Tessellations and Patterns in an Absorbing Short Film

June 17, 2022

Grace Ebert

Basic geometric forms like circles, triangles, and lines alchemize into a hypnotic study of patterns in a new short film from the Barcelona-based Diatomic Studio. Part of their Tiles series, the animation applies kinetic principles to minimal, black-and-white renderings. The actions, which include transaction, rotation, and trajectory, transform the otherwise static shapes into mesmerizing tessellations and increasingly complex and dizzying motifs. For more of Diatomic Studio’s experiments in geometry and physics, head to Vimeo.

 

 

 

 



Photography

Vibrant Textiles and Repurposed Eyewear Camouflage the Subjects of Thandiwe Muriu’s Celebratory Portraiture

May 22, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Thandiwe Muriu, shared with permission

From chunky hair beads and rollers to sink strainers and brake pedals, Nairobi-based photographer Thandiwe Muriu (previously) finds fashionable use for ordinary objects. Worn as glasses that obscure a subject’s identity, the repurposed items add cultural flair to Muriu’s vibrant portraits and are connected to both her background and Kenyan life, more broadly. Red fringe evokes the tassel that hung from her uncle’s Toyota Corolla, which transported the artist home from school each day, while the orange plastic drain catcher references the joy found in sharing chores. She explains:

In Kenya, when a group of friends meet, the women usually gather in the kitchen to clean up after the meal is done, and as is part of Kenyan culture, wash the piles of dishes by hand. This routine task suddenly becomes a moment of laughter and stories as the women mingle and bonds are reinforced…(The portrait) celebrates the African spirit of community as it turns humble sink strainers into bright circles of joy.

Shot against bold fabric backdrops printed with dizzying patterns, Muriu’s works conceal her subjects’ bodies under perfectly aligned garments, leaving only their heads and hands visible. The photographs are part of her ongoing CAMO series, which explores how culture both creates and consumes individual identities. Incorporating rich color palettes and traditional architectural hairstyles, Muriu celebrates her African heritage while questioning beauty standards and self-perception.

Some of the photographer’s portraits are on view this month at Photo London 2022 and at 1-54 Fair in New York. In July, she’ll have a solo show with 193 Gallery at the new Maison Kitsuné Gallery in New York, as well. You can explore the full CAMO series on her site and Instagram.

 

Image © Thandiwe Muriu

Image © Thandiwe Muriu

Image © Thandiwe Muriu

Image © Thandiwe Muriu

Image © Thandiwe Muriu

Image © Thandiwe Muriu

Image © Thandiwe Muriu

 

 



Food

Stripes, Checkered Motifs, and Other Geometric Designs Turn Pasta into Colorfully Patterned Cuisine

January 12, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © David Rivillo, shared with permission

Chef David Rivillo diverges from the standard box of spaghetti or penne stocked on most supermarket shelves by adding some flair to his handmade fare. The pasta enthusiast fashions bowties and tortellini with vibrant stripes and heaps of checkered fettuccine that are more evocative of textiles or stained glass than saucy dishes. Behind each printed dough is a study into the best ingredients for structure and color, in addition to an understanding of the chemical relationship between the two that ensures each design retains its pattern throughout the cooking process.

Having amassed significant followings on Instagram and TikTok, Rivillo first began the project in 2019 following the death of the late artist Carlos Cruz Diez. “I reproduced the ‘Cromointerferencia de color aditivo,’ an artwork he created for the Simón Bolívar International Airport, one of the most representative artworks for all Venezuelans,” he said in an interview. “Since then, my mind has never stopped thinking about it and how to get different designs and patterns.”

 

 

 



Illustration Science

In ‘Wild Design,’ Vintage Illustrations Expose the Patterns and Shapes Behind All Life on Earth

January 5, 2022

Grace Ebert

Ernst Haeckel, Kunstformen der Natur, 1904. Gotha: Bibliographisches Institut. All images from Wild Design: Nature’s Architects by Kimberly Ridley, published by Princeton Architectural Press, shared with permission of the publisher

Focusing on the patterns and shapes that structure the planet, a new book published by Princeton Architectural Press explores the science behind a trove of organically occurring forms. Wild Design: Nature’s Architects by author Kimberly Ridley pairs dozens of vintage illustrations—spot the work of famed German biologist Ernst Haeckel (previously) among them—with essays detailing the function of the striking phenomena, from the smallest organisms to the monumental foundations that extend across vast swaths of land. These structures are simultaneously beautiful and crucial to life on Earth and include the sprawling mycelium networks connecting life above and below ground, the papery, hexagonal cells comprising honeycomb, and a spider’s funnel-like web tailored to trap its prey. Dive further into the world of Wild Design by picking up a copy from Bookshop.

 

(Johann Andreas Naumann, Naturgeschichte der Vögel Deutschlands, 1820. Leipzig: G. Fleischer

Ernst Haeckel, Kunstformen der Natur, 1904. Gotha: Bibliographisches Institut

Berthold Seemann, Journal of Botany, 1863. London: R. Hardwicke

Henry C. McCook, American Spiders and Their Spinning Work, 1889. Philadelphia: Academy of Natural Science of Philadelphia

 

Henri de Saussure, Études sur la famille des vespides, 1852. Paris: V. Masson

Oliver B. Bunce and William C. Cullen, Picturesque America, 1872. New York: D. Appleton