pens

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Art Illustration

Meditative Geometric Shapes Doodled on Old Ledgers by Albert Chamillard

November 1, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Albert Chamillard’s monochromatic pen drawings have drawn acclaim for their ability to calm the minds of viewers. It’s interesting to learn, then, that Chamillard listens to punk and metal while crafting his art, which he shared in an interview with Faithwaites. Though each monochromatic pen-wrought work is undeniably flat, the artist’s careful use of cross-hatching creates a sense of volume by contrasting more- and less-saturated areas. Chamillard uses found and deadstock paper, especially vintage ledgers, and engages the papers’ subtle blue and red writing rules to frame subtle zig-zag patterns within each imagined plane, which further enlivens his seemingly simple drawings.

When he’s not working on his personal projects after hours, Chamillard runs a drawing and book making studio in Tucson, Arizona. He is represented by Eric Firestone Gallery in New York and Etherton Gallery in Tuscon. You can see more from the artist on Instagam.

 

 



Art

New Sprawling Ink Drawings by Olivia Kemp Explore the Landscapes of Malta and Bavaria

August 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All images courtesy of Olivia Kemp

British artist Olivia Kemp (previously) creates sprawling, large-scale ink drawings of real world landscapes that are built from photography, observational sketches, and her own memories of the visited destinations. Her two most recent works took a combined nine months to complete, and are pulled from her travels to Malta and Bavaria. Kemp’s drawing “Ascending The High Pass” is inspired by Bavaria’s castles, and is composed of towers, cliffs, and a winding train line that connects the city through a series of bridges and tunnels.

For her other recent piece, she focused more on the plant life of the location. “Unlike with the castles drawing, ‘Melita, Maleth’ was very much a response to selecting a random location and spending time there getting to know it,” Kemp tells Colossal. “I was interested in going to Malta, but didn’t have any particular drawing or architectural style or composition in mind before I went. I loved the variation of plant life on the island, and felt really strongly that the drawing needed to have a full and rich foreground, including all the flora that had most interested me.”

Kemp will often create smaller drawing studies while on location, which she will then incorporate into her larger works. Both “Ascending The High Pass” and “Melita, Maleth” will be included in the group exhibition Early Modern Matters which opens on September 6 at James Freeman Gallery in London and closes September 29, 2018. You can see more of the artist’s work on Instagram and Twitter.

"Melita, Maleth" in process

“Melita, Maleth” in process

"Melita, Maleth"

“Melita, Maleth”

"Melita, Maleth" in process

“Melita, Maleth” in process

"Melita, Maleth" with reference drawings

“Melita, Maleth” with reference drawings

"Melita, Maleth" in process

“Melita, Maleth” in process

Detail of "Ascending The High Pass"

Detail of “Ascending The High Pass”

"Ascending The High Pass" in process

“Ascending The High Pass” in process

"Ascending The High Pass"

“Ascending The High Pass”

"Ascending The High Pass" in process

“Ascending The High Pass” in process

Olivia drawing "Ascending The High Pass"

Olivia drawing “Ascending The High Pass”

 

 

 



Illustration

Stippled Black and White Illustrations of Star-Packed Galaxies by Petra Kostova

February 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Copenhagen-based graphic designer and illustrator Petra Kostova of Pet & Dot creates dazzling galaxies composed of millions of stippled dots. To produce her concentrated star systems and cloudy nebulas she uses technical pens (either rOtring Rapidograph or Isograph) to draw on black and white paper. Due to the limitations of her color scheme, each work is completely formed through the intensity of her chosen dots—a meditative process which can often take her several weeks or months to complete.

Kostova also produces handmade prints created by a technique called Photogravure, which accurately reproduces her stippled detail. You can find these, and her original drawings, on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Surreal Drawings Created From Ballpoint Pen and Embroidery by Nuria Riaza

August 25, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Spanish artist Nuria Riaza uses bright blue ballpoint ink to create drawings of segmented faces and other surreal scenes, pieces that capture an expressive detail most would not associate with the everyday office supply. Riaza has been attracted to the medium since she was five or six, and fully dedicated herself to working with ballpoint pens since she was around 21-years-old.

The process is one of her favorite aspects of the medium, losing herself in the many hours it takes to finish each drawing. In addition to the blue ink, Riaza sometimes incorporates embroidery to give a warmth to the work, adding small details of gold or red thread to emphasize the surreal qualities of specific drawings. Despite branching out to experiment with other mediums, these elements are only ever a small part of her practice, ballpoint pen continuing to serve as her main inspiration.

“I recommend that you try and use the pen as something more than a writing tool—to eat it as if it were a toothpick, to make fake tattoos with it, to use them as rollers in your hair, and to draw a lot,” says Riaza in her artist statement. “It’s something almost therapeutic, like how people draw mandalas, and you learn that the mistakes are also beautiful on paper.”

You can see more of her blue drawings and peaks into future projects on her Instagram. (via Creators Project)

 

 



Art Design

LIX: The World’s Smallest 3D Printing Pen Lets You Draw in the Air

April 29, 2014

Christopher Jobson

LIX is the latest contender in the handheld 3D-printing field. Launched just a few hours ago on Kickstarter, the developers say the super compact design is smaller than any other pen on the market and it can even be powered by the electricity from a USB port. After turning it on the LIX takes less than a minute to heat up and you’re ready to start creating vertical illustrations. Via LIX:

LIX 3D printing pen has the similar function as 3D printers. It melts and cools coloured plastic, letting you create rigid and freestanding structures. Lix has a hot-end nozzle that is power supplied from USB 3.0 port. The plastic filament ABS/PLA is introduced in the upper extremity of Lix Pen. The filament goes through a patented mechanism while moving through the pen to finally reach the hot-end nozzle which melts and cools it down. An interesting fact about this light-weight, engineered pen is that these structures can be formed in any imaginable shape.

The LIX pen has a much sleeker form and a finer tip than similar devices we’ve seen like the 3Doodler, though it’s a bit more expensive. See more on their website. (via Mashable)

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Design

Circuit Scribe: Instantly Draw Functional Electrical Circuits on a Piece of Paper

November 22, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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The folks over at Urbana-based Electroninks Incorporated just launched a Kickstarter project for a new kind of pen that draws fuctional electronic circuits instantly. Called the Circuit Scribe, the handy little device works like a regular ballpoint pen and releases a non-toxic conductive silver ink that dries instantly. Via Kickstarter:

Circuit Scribe is for Makers, STEM Educators, Artists, Kids, & Life Hackers. We wanted to make it easier for Makers to Make. No shaking, no squeezing, no goop, no smell, no waiting for ink to dry. Circuit Scribe draws smooth lines with conductive silver ink and allows you to create functioning circuits instantly.

The project went viral immediately easily surpassed its $85,000 goal within a day or so. Watch the video above or learn more about it here.

 

 



Design

Polar: A Fun Modular Pen Made of Powerful Neodymium Magnets

September 21, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Is it a toy? A tool? It’s both, and it’s amazing. Polar is a modular pen and stylus made of 12 neodymium magnets that can be disassembled for all kinds of quirky and functional purposes. The pen is the brainchild of Andrew Gardner over at Indiedesign and is one of many great projects to appear since Kickerstarter expanded into Canada only two weeks ago. Polar will come in both silver and 24k gold models, in multiple colors, and has an add-on of chrome-plated steel ball bearings to create additional magnetized objects. Pick one up over on Kickstarter.

 

 

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