performance

Posts tagged
with performance



Art Dance Music

A Dramatic Performance by Juilliard Students Brings a Socially Distant Approach to Ravel's Boléro

May 4, 2020

Grace Ebert

Maurice Ravel’s Boléro is a particularly collaborative composition in that it passes the melodic theme through a series of solos. The sequential performances highlight the distinct tones and sounds of each instrument, whether it be a flute, violin, or the anomalous saxophone. In a spectacular new project, dozens of Juilliard students who now are quarantined in their respective homes bring a socially distant approach to the classic orchestral composition. What makes it especially impressive, though, is not just appearances by famous alumni—watch for Yo-Yo Ma, Laura Linney, Patti LuPone, and Itzhak Perlman—but because it coordinates the instrumental piece in addition to a range of dramatic and choreographed elements that appear to transcend individual frames.

In a statement about the project, Juilliard said the hundreds of video clips were filmed separately before being edited and overlayed into a single composition. “Bolero Juilliard, assembled by a team of artists all working from remote locations, is part narrative, part collage. Most of all, it is a collective endeavor that captures a snapshot of a specific global moment and the possibilities of creative connection in an uncertain world,” the school said. The assembled video is “a complex online puzzle with many components being conceived, rehearsed, and produced simultaneously.”

If you enjoyed Juilliard’s project, check out this music video filmed entirely on Zoom and these quarantine dispatches. (via Kottke)

 

 

 



Art

Stretchy Monochrome Suits by Malin Bülow Tether Performers to Architecture and Each Other

April 24, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Oslo-based artist Malin Bülow creates performative installations in which humans resist and submit to tension created by stretchy lycra suits. The monotone pieces have small openings at the stomach that allow participants to crawl in and easily conceal themselves, obscuring their features while highlighting their movements.

When affixed to buildings, the flexible fabric is manipulated and stretched during time-based performances, such as Bülow’s 2017 site-specific installation Firkanta elastisitet – Skulptur i spenn (Squared elasticity – Strained sculpture) with Store Salen at Kunstbanken, Hedmark Kunstsenter. For the installation, the artist covered the two entrances to the gallery with the suits, locking visitors inside for the full hour.

Other less claustrophobic installations have occurred outdoors, such as the 2017 iteration of the same performance at a former military building in Ski, outside of Oslo. In an alien-like performance that the artist describes as an “elastic sculpture” or “large-scale performative still life,” five dancers explore the tension of their tethers while attached to the structure.

Bülow hails from Switzerland and studied as a neurobiologist before receiving a Master’s degree from Oslo National Academy of the Arts in Norway. You can see more of Bülow’s work on her website. (via Sophie Gunnol)

 

 



Art

Human-Powered Clocks by Maarten Baas Physically Mark the Passage of Time

March 14, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Dutch artist Maarten Baas produces artworks that lie at the intersection of visual art, performance, and design, creating manual clocks that are erased and redrawn on the stroke of each minute. In pieces like Grandfather Clock and Schiphol Clock Baas places himself within the structure of the time-telling devices, functioning as the works’ human mechanism. Other pieces from his Real Time series use the assistance of another performer to create 12-hour films, such as a line of perpetually swept trash doubling as a clock arm. Baas began the time-based series in 2009 at the Salone Del Mobile in Milan, Italy, and has a current piece in the group exhibition Design by Time at the Pratt Institute through April 13, 2019. You can see more of his works on his website, Instagram, and Vimeo, and in the videos below.

 

 

 



Art

Modified Office Chairs Perform an Autonomous Dance Through Gagosian Gallery

September 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Nine office chairs, each in a dazzling jewel tone, swirl and scuttle across the reflective floor of Gagosian‘s West 21st Street gallery. PLAY was conceived by Swiss artist Urs Fischer (previously) with choreography for the inanimate objects provided by New York City-based artist Madeline Hollander. The self-propelled furniture is controlled by programming and sensors embedded in their seats which moves them away from visitors or towards each other while swirling through the extensive space. When the performative chairs are running low on battery, they are programmed to head to a machine located inside the gallery that automatically replaces their seats.

Visitors may walk through the herd of functional chairs, observing the pieces as they group together, move in synchronized turns, or scatter. You can interact with the objects yourself during PLAY’s run at Gagosian through October 13, 2018. (via Artsy)

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Gagosian (@gagosian) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by ARTnews (@artnewsmag) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Julie Tuyet Curtiss (@julietuyetcurtiss) on

 

 



Amazing Science

The Science Behind Incredible Bubbles Explained by Pro Bubbler Melody Yang

June 14, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

With a lifetime of bubble experience under her belt, Melody Yang of the Gazillion Bubbles Show shows the method behind the madness. Much of the formula and nuances of technique are, unsurprisingly, proprietary. But the video above, from Wired, is a fun look behind the scenes as Yang demonstrates her expertise and shares some stories of her career as a bubble engineer. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 



Art Dance

Dancers Demonstrate the Perpetual 'Mechanics of History' in a Performance by Yoann Bourgeois

October 26, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Visitors to the Panthéon in Paris earlier this month have been encountering an unusual sight. For about ten days in October, multi-disciplinary movement artist Yoann Bourgeois installed a rotating circular stairway with a discrete trampoline at its center, and a small cast of anonymously clothed dancers trudged up the steps, each one falling in succession onto the trampoline and seamlessly rebounding back on to the stairs.

The installation was strategically placed over the Panthéon’s Foucault Pendulum, which was devised by French physicist Léon Foucault and offers an easy-to-understand demonstration of Earth’s rotation. Commonly replicated at science museums around the world, the Panthéon’s pendulum has been the most well-known since its inception in 1851. According to co-producers Théâtre de la Ville, Bourgeois’s work is a meditation on Earth’s gravity.

Entitled ‘La mécanique de l’Histoire’ (The Mechanics of History), the performance is a part of the Monuments En Movement series at the Panthéon. Video by Tony Whitfield.