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Art

A Large-Scale Flocked Steel Mural Accented With Live Foliage by Frank Plant

September 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Sculptor Frank Plant (previously) creates large-scale sculptural drawings of grouped bodies made from flocked steel. One of his most recent pieces, Grow, presents two groups of students engaged in casual conversation. The green-flocked individuals sit together on the ground with accessories such as backpacks and lunch boxes resting casually at their side. The artist lent an added touch to his typical work style for this mural by installing live plants as stand-ins for the students’ hair. The public work was created for Wageningen University in the Netherlands, a top university for agricultural and earth sciences. You can see more of the Barcelona-based artist’s work on his website and Behance.

 

 



Art

Indoor Installation of 10,000 Plants Considers Relationship Between Endangered Australian Grasslands and Architecture

September 4, 2018

Andrew LaSane

All images by Rory Gardiner

For Australia’s Venice Architecture Biennale pavilion, curators Mauro Baracco and Louise Wright, of Baracco+Wright Architects worked with artist Linda Tegg to create Grasslands Repair, a 10,000-plant recreation of the grasslands of southeast Victoria. The living indoor installation spans much of the pavilion and extends to its outdoor space, with walkways that allow viewers to move among the 65 species of Western Plains Grasslands plants.

The theme for the 2018 biennale (which opened in May) is “Repair,” which was described in a press release as a way of considering how architecture can “play a role in repairing the places it is part of.” Only one percent of the grasslands of mid-18th century Victoria still exists— largely the result of urbanization and industrial land use — so for Baracco, Wright, and Tegg, Grasslands Repair shows the real cost of human land occupation. “The area of plants exhibited is similar to that taken up by the pavilion,” the curators said. “It is also a smaller area than that of an average Australian family house. Such an area takes around an hour to bulldoze.”

Supporting the living garden from above is an installation called Skylight, which uses LEDs as an artificial light source since the walls and ceiling of the structure block the sun. Throughout the biennale, films that explore the theme of Repair are screened on the walls of the Grasslands Repair installation, including Ground, which was created by Baracco+Wright and Tegg in collaboration with David Fox. Without the history of the region for context, the installation is just another indoor garden perfectly suited for selfies, but with the knowledge of what human interaction has done to indigenous species, it becomes a call to action to try and undo the damage we have done.

The 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale continues through November 25, 2018. (via Dezeen)

 

 



Photography

Infrared Photographs by Pierre-Louis Ferrer Capture French Landscapes in Bright Yellow Hues

August 31, 2018

Anna Marks

In French photographer Pierre-Louis Ferrer’s vibrant photographs, Dordogne, France is transformed into an enchanted land bathed in canary yellow. Ferrer’s colorful photographs illustrate the country’s idyllic topography, where the leaves upon the trees, fresh grass, and sculpted shrubbery are captured in the same vivid color.

While photographing, Ferrer takes time to observe his environment and decide on the best photographic technique to use. For his Dordogne photographs, Ferrer used an infrared photography technique which allowed him to capture the landscape in brilliant yellows. “My artistic approach is based on the invisible and imperceptible,” Ferrer tells Colossal. “I work with invisible parts of light (infrared and ultraviolet) and with techniques like long exposure to offer alternative views of our world.”

This yellow effect in Ferrer’s Dordogne photographs is due to a mix of visible and infrared light, and each plant species appears different depending on how it reacts to the light. “I use a selective filter that let’s pass a large part of infrared light and a small part of visible light,” Ferrer explains. “The main subjects of this technique are trees and foliage because they react a lot under infrared light.”

Although yellow is prevalent in nature; found in bananas, autumnal leaves, egg yolks, and the irises of some animal’s eyes, in Ferrer’s photographs he standardizes all natural elements, highlighting the color’s prevalence in natural forms.

As human eyes are not used to infrared light (due to its longer wavelengths), Ferrer’s photographs invite viewers to see Dordogne as through they are in a different dimension. The extravagant Jardins Suspendus at Marqueyssac and its ivy-covered châteaux are transformed into an ethereal world that might otherwise only appear in paintings.

Although fantastical, Ferrer’s photographs encourage mindfulness and allow us to reflect upon the importance of nature. “My goals are to invite contemplation, to realize the place of nature in urban places, to make aware of the impact of our environment on us, and our impact on the environment.”

To view more about his work visit his website and Instagram.

 

 



Design

Lush Greenery Fills Pixelated Openings and a Vertical Landscape in Jean Nouvel’s Tower 25

August 21, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Tower 25 is a 220-foot-tall structure by French architect Jean Nouvel that features a range of perforated square openings packed with a variety of lush greenery. The building opened in Nicosia, Cyprus in 2015 and includes a vertical landscape on the south facade that is 80% covered in verdant matter. This element works as a natural awning for the apartments and offices during the summer, and allows the plants to absorb the maximum amount of light in the winter. The top two floors of the building surround a courtyard inspired by Cypriot architecture, further incorporating a green landscape into the structure’s design. You can see more of Nouvel’s projects on his website. (via Jeroen Apers)

 

 



Illustration Photography

Sticks, Seeds, and Petals From the American Southwest Inspire New Insect-Shaped Arrangements by Raku Inoue

July 12, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Raku Inoue (previously) recently look an extended road trip to several destinations in the American Southwest. During his journey he created a scorpion-shaped arrangement from seeds, sticks, and a pepper found at Antelope Canyon in Arizona, and utilized a fallen cactus segment near Horseshoe Bend as the abdomen in a prickly tarantula. Other works created with found natural elements during Inoue’s trip include a turtle bug, red ant, and centipede.

Recently Inoue created a monochrome stag beetle and Monarch butterfly for a short film in collaboration with CBC Arts. The artist has also begun to explore three-dimensional versions of his found flora creations, building armatures for a gorilla, water buffalo, and tiger. More foraged creations can be found on his Instagram.

 

 



Art

Incredibly Intricate Glasswork by Janis Miltenberger is Inspired by Mythology

June 11, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Cynara’s Lush Gift, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, bee created by Wesley Fleming, 35”H x 11”L x 11”D. All images used with permission of the artist.

Glass artist Janis Miltenberger draws on the roles of mythology and storytelling as attempts to explain our experience of the world to build complex glass sculptures. Her work often takes the shape of recognizable objects, like human figures and chairs, which are then filled with incredible detail. The artist uses borosilicate glass, and enhanced with glass colors, gold luster, sandblasting, and oil paint. 

Miltenberger shares with Colossal that she was originally drawn to ceramics, and discovered glassblowing in college, where she apprenticed with Richard Marquis. Many years later, she was introduced to lampworking, which is her preferred technique today. She explains, “working alone with a torch was more personal and I don’t think I was quite as aware at that point how I needed that space set apart to focus and identify my ideas and voice.”

The artist’s most recent series, “Doctrine of Signatures,” is based on The Signature of All Things, a 17th century book by Jakob Boehme which detailed the commonly-held belief that the outward appearance of a plant reflected its medicinal value. She is currently working on a large installation that moves away from her decorative style. In fall 2018, Miltenberger will be teaching in Niijima, Japan, and her work will be shown at the Bellevue Art Museum in Washington state. (via Lustik)

Cynara’s Lush Gift (detail), Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, bee created by Wesley Fleming, 35”H x 11”L x 11”D

Golden Memory, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 35”H x 11”L x 11”D

Golden Memory (detail), Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 35”H x 11”L x 11”D

Doctrine of Signatures, Photographer Lynn Thompson, 38″H x 14″W x 13″D

Doctrine of Signatures (detail), Photographer Lynn Thompson, 38″H x 14″W x 13″D

Golden Tinged Hope, Photographer Lynn Thompson, 84”H x 24”L x 13”D

Golden Tinged Hope (detail), Photographer Lynn Thompson, 84”H x 24”L x 13”D

Dividing Line, wall piece, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 34”H x 16”L x 4.5”D

Dividing Line (detail), wall piece, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 34”H x 16”L x 4.5”D

Quiet Breath, wall piece, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 30″H x 20″L x 4.5″D

Quiet Breath (detail), wall piece, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 30″H x 20″L x 4.5″D

Quiet Breath (detail), wall piece, Photographer Peter Kuhnlein @ACME Creative, 30″H x 20″L x 4.5″D

 

 



Photography Science

Macro Infrared Photographs Unlock the Depth of Green in a Stunning Array of Canary Island Plants

May 25, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All images via Field

Marcus Wendt, creative director at the London-based studio Field, recently traveled to the island of Lanzarote to shoot a series of macro images of the region’s native plants. His project, Suprachromacy transforms cacti and other light-absorbing species into vibrant, multi-hued beings through infrared photography. Needles and spines of one species glow bright blue, while others are illuminated in deep orange tones.

The project was inspired by Isaac Newton’s quote, “For the Rays, to speak properly, are not colored. In them, there is nothing else than a certain power and disposition to stir up a sensation of this or that color.” Its intension is to spark inquiry about a color’s origin. Is color an inherent part of the object? Or is it an individualized sensation?

“For us, these alien color spectra spark ideas about how we see color, how much depth is locked up in the color green, and whether color is a property or a sensation,” says Wendt. “And also what plants might look like on planets under a different colored sun.”

You can see other technology and photo-based projects by Field on their website and Instagram. (via My Modern Met)