portraits

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Photography

Spools of Colorful Tape and Piles of Painted Canvases Transform Subjects into Living Works of Art

September 28, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

French creative studio Akatre was recently asked by Centre Pompidou to create a series of visuals that would further engage the Paris-based institution’s audience. For the project, Akatre knew they wanted to humanize the museum’s visitor communication materials, while also speaking to the act of creation. The studio shot a series of seven portraits that covered their subjects’ heads with arts and craft materials such as spools of colorful tape, dozens of paintbrushes, and drips of neon paint. The works will be incorporated into Centre Pompidou’s visitor publications, with three of the images printed on upcoming membership cards. You can see more projects by Akatre, including these slime-covered portraits, on their Instagram and Behance.

 

 



Art Photography

Digitally Altered Portraits Superimposed with Flowers, Antique Patterns, and Wildlife Illustrations by Tawny Chatmon

September 21, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Maryland-based artist Tawny Chatmon combines traditional portraiture with digital collage, layering elements of antique patterns, vintage botanicals, and wildlife illustrations onto images of her children and other relatives. Once printed, Chatmon often revisits the digital textures she has superimposed, physically adding layers of gold ornamental elements or paint.

“My camera remains my primary tool of communication, while my constant exploration of diverse ways of expression moves me to add several different layers using a variety of mediums,” explains Chatmon to Colossal, “After a portrait session is complete, I typically digitally manipulate my portraits and unite them with other photographic components to achieve a work that is a new expression—often lending to them the eyes of someone their elder and more wise, and almost always exaggerating their hair.”

Her children not only serve as her models, but also her greatest source of inspiration while making work. Chatmon further explains that the layered portraits are driven by her “desire to contribute something important to a world I want my children to thrive in.” The artist’s work will be on display as part of The Art of Blackness Exhibition in Chicago, which opens at Block 37 on October 12, 2018. You can see more of her work on her website and Instagram. (via Beautiful Bizarre Magazine)

 

 



Art Illustration

Nuanced Portraits of Women Merged With Abstract Environments by Sofia Bonati

September 19, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Self-taught artist Sofia Bonati captures nuanced expressions and personalities of a variety of female characters while also integrating them into abstracted environments and patterns. Her illustrations most often feature solo subjects melded with thunderclouds, dizzying mazes, and floral patterns. Bonita renders the women’s features in graphite and she uses gesso, paint, and markers to add colorful accents and build their surroundings. The strong, distinctive expressions on each woman’s face suggests that the characters are in control of their environments, rather than being subsumed by them.

In a recent collaboration with Society6, several of the Argentinian artist’s works have been animated by glitch artist Chris McDaniel. You can see more of Bonita’s work on Facebook and Instagram, and find a variety of products featuring her designs on Society6. (via Visual Fodder)

 

 



Photography

Uncanny Resemblances Between Classic Dog Breeds and Humans Captured by Gerrard Gethings

September 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Gerrard Gethings has captured a lot of personalities as an animal photographer, including his own canine muse Baxter. Therefore when he began shooting his latest series that paired humans and look-alike dog breeds, it would only make sense that he would first focus on finding the perfect animal models before locating matching humans. For the memory game Do You Look Like Your Dog? Gethings spent a year creating images that examine the classic trope of owners looking just like their canine friends. The new game presents 25 matches, which include a long-haired Afghan and equally silky-haired owner, a messy-haired kid and his scruffy puppy, and Schnauzer with a matching beard to his leather jacket-clad owner. You can now purchase the memory game through Laurence King, and see more of Gethings’s animal portraiture on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Flipped Perspectives Explored in New Intimate Paintings by Cinta Vidal

September 12, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"On Chairs," Acrylic on wood, 32 x 32 cm

“On Chairs,” Acrylic on wood, 32 x 32 cm

Barcelona-based artist Cinta Vidal has previously produced fictionalized architectural paintings that study how individuals with differing perspectives can view and inhabit the same world. Vidal crafts her visual metaphors by placing subjects onto floating islands, presenting each with a different vantage point depending on their chosen location. In her newer series of works, Vidal focuses more intently on intimate relationships, populating her suspended clusters of furniture, animals, and household objects with only two or three individuals rather than a larger population.

Her Couples series places pairs of characters in opposition to each other, exaggerating her previous explorations of human understanding. In these works two male figures sit back-to-back as they type on their own laptops, a woman peers longingly from an armchair as a man stands facing the opposite direction below her chair, and a boy photographer and woman stare at the same scene, but from flipped perspectives. These works show how two people might hold differing ideals, despite occupying the same community or household.

The included paintings will be presented alongside a mural in Vidal’s upcoming solo exhibition Viewpoints at Thinkspace Projects in Los Angeles from September 15 through October 6, 2018. You can view more of the artist’s gravity-defying works on her website and Instagram.

"Outing," Oil on wood panel, 55 x 55 cm

“Outing,” Oil on wood panel, 55 x 55 cm

"Working," Acrylic on wood, 20 x 32 cm

“Working,” Acrylic on wood, 20 x 32 cm

"Couple 4," Acrylic on wood, 13.4 x 32 cm (L) and "Couple 3," Acrylic on wood, 13.6 x 32 cm (R)

“Couple 4,” Acrylic on wood, 13.4 x 32 cm (L) and “Couple 3,” Acrylic on wood, 13.6 x 32 cm (R)

"Four Cats Three Kids," Acrylic on wood, 35 x 50 cm

“Four Cats Three Kids,” Acrylic on wood, 35 x 50 cm

"Living Together," Acrylic on wood, 63.5 x 50 cm

“Living Together,” Acrylic on wood, 63.5 x 50 cm

"Couple 2," Acrylic on wood, 11.2 x 32 cm

“Couple 2,” Acrylic on wood, 11.2 x 32 cm

"Coworking," Oil on wood panel, 80 x 80 cm

“Coworking,” Oil on wood panel, 80 x 80 cm

"Caravan," Oil on wood, 36 x 36 cm

“Caravan,” Oil on wood, 36 x 36 cm

 

 



History Photography

A New Book by Alison Nastasi Looks at the Affectionate Relationships Between Writers and Their Cats

August 20, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

In a follow-up to her best-selling book Artists and their Cats (previously), Alison Nastasi has penned Writers and Their Cats. The new book features photographs of writers past and present with their feline companions. Ranging from Elizabeth Bishop to Haruki Murakami, Nastasi’s book looks into the domestic lives of forty-five renowned novelists, poets, and journalists from around the world. Each short and sweet profile includes reminiscences on the roles writers’ cats have played in fueling creativity, providing comfort, and even getting interview subjects to open up. Writers and Their Cats will be published by Chronicle on August 21, 2018, and is available for presale in The Colossal Shop.

Gillian Flynn, photography credit: Peter Hoffman/Redux

Left: Jirō Osaragi, photography credit: Akira Ishii/Courtesy Osaragi Jirō Memorial Museum. Right: Helen Gurley Brown, photography credit: Bettmann/Getty Images

Ray Bradbury, photography credit: Topfoto

Alice Walker, photography credit: Peter Hoffman/Redux

Left: Jorge Luis Borges, photography credit: Ferdinando Scianna/Magnum Photos. Right: Judy Blume, photography credit: Bettman/Getty Images

Mark Twain, photography credit: Underwood & Underwood/New York Times/Courtesy Wikimedia Commons

 

 



Art Photography

Betta Fish Imitate Elegantly Posed Dancers in New Portraits by Visarute Angkatavanich

August 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Thai photographer Visarute Angkatavanich (previously) creates richly hued portraits that appear more like staged dance images than animal photography. It is only when staring directly at the bug-eyed expressions of his subjects that one understands they are staring at a fish and not a costumed ballerina. Angkatavanich photographs domesticated betta fish against white and black backgrounds to isolate their natural shades and present the illusion that they are moving through space. Late last year he released a book of Siamese fighting fish portraits titled Betta Paradiso. You can view more of his recent fish photography on 500px.

 

 

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