reclaimed wood

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with reclaimed wood



Art

Geometric Shapes and Angular Faces Combine in New Salvaged Wood Murals, Assemblages, and Tattoos by Expanded Eye

October 8, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Expanded Eye (previously) is an arts collective formed by London-based artists Jade Tomlinson and Kevin James that utilizes a wide range of media to explore human consciousness and connectivity. The pair use salvaged wood to create colorful assemblages, sculptures, and public murals each designed in their unmistakable geometric style. Natural elements such as plants and birds are common motifs in their three-dimensional works. These images also cross over into their long-running tattoo practice which combines illustrated doodles, architecture-inspired renderings, and triangular patterns.

The duo is currently in Lisbon for a three month residency at WOZEN, which wraps up next month. During their stay they have been exploring the socio-economic and environmental pressures of the community, and creating work that seeks to address local issues of over-consumption, waste, and gentrification in Portugal’s capital. A cumulative exhibition titled No Future Without Memory will open at the space on November 9, and include the many large-scale three-dimensional works the pair have made during their time at the studio. You can follow more of their work on Instagram and Facebook.

Image by Sylvain Deleu

Image by Sylvain Deleu

 

 



Art

Mischievous Wooden Trolls Take Over an Arboretum in Northern Illinois

August 7, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

This summer, Danish artist Thomas Dambo (previously) has brought his fun-loving and kid-friendly trolls to the Morton Arboretum near Chicago, Illinois. Six site-specific characters range from Joe the Guardian surveying the neighboring highway to Sneaky Socks Alexa hidden in a cluster of shrubs. Dambo constructed the large storybook creatures using reclaimed wood sourced from fallen trees and branches as well as retired pallets and packing crates. Each figure towers up to thirty feet tall, with reclining Little Artur stretching sixty feet long. The exhibition, titled Troll Hunt, marks the Copenhagen-based artist’s first large-scale show in the United States. You can see Dambo’s fantastical creations at the Arboretum through the end of 2018 (and possibly into 2019, weather-dependent). Follow along with his creations on Facebook.

 

 



Design

An Airborne Village of Stacking Vertical Homes at the Brooklyn Children’s Museum

December 21, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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All images photographed by Ryan Jenq

Sky Villages, designed by James Paulius, is an interactive installation at the SPARK Brooklyn Children’s Museum. The play center features several stackable modules that can be rearranged as expanding homes—wooden dwellings floating between clouds in an aquamarine sky. The imaginative play area aims to educate children about our planet’s constantly evolving population, offering a space for airborne ideas.

“As Earth’s population increases, we may look to the atmosphere for inhabitable space,” said Paulius. “Sky Villages presents the possibility to dwell in the sky in modular architecture that can be added or removed as populations increase or decrease. Dwelling units are prefabricated with the intent of reuse rather than discardment. When a unit no longer fits the particular needs of its location, it can be moved elsewhere for a new family to reside in. Constantly evolving, these structures accommodate the ever-changing tendencies of humanity and nature.”

The toy homes for Sky Villages were fabricated from wood reclaimed from water towers in Manhattan. You can see more of Paulius’ block-based projects on his portfolio site and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Art

A Reclaimed Wood Installation Sourced From the San Francisco Dump by Barbara Holmes

April 21, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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“Untitled, No. 5” (2012), reclaimed lath installation at 1045 Mission St. San Francisco CA. All images via Barbara Holmes

Barbara Holmes' installation Untitled, No. 5 is a site-specific example of one woman’s trash is another one’s treasure. The spiraling wooden work that was installed at 1045 Mission St. was completely sourced from the city’s own dump, turning thrown away limber into a kaleidoscopic work that spanned both the length and height of the gallery space.

Using sourced and reclaimed materials is at the heart of Holmes’ practice, carefully transforming the untidy elements into aesthetically crafted pieces. “At first glance my work my appear oddly familiar or utilitarian,” says Holmes in her artist statement, “but on closer inspection of the materials and their re-contextualization, the viewer may need to reconsider initial ideas as they discover more layers of meaning.”

This spring Holmes had a solo exhibition titled “Reclamation” at the SaddleCack College Art Gallery in Mission Viejo. You can see more of her recycled works on her website. (via Dark Silence in Suburbia)

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Design

Tiny Reclaimed Wood Cabins That Appear Plucked From the Pages of Dr. Seuss

August 3, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Dan Pauly builds guest cottages, playhouses, garden sheds, and saunas all appearing to be perfectly suited for an enchanted forest. The small, asymmetrical buildings have a long slanted roof, crooked chimney, and charming front window with built-in flower box. Each cabin designed by Pauly and his company The Rustic Way is built with reclaimed wood, each piece restored to reflect its natural weathered condition.

Pauly’s woodworking history goes back four generations, back to the 1800s when his family emigrated to the US and built several barns in Minnesota (some of which are still standing). This history is embedded into Pauly’s fascination with reclaimed wood. “As I uncover an old barn or shed,” Pauly says, “I realize that it could be the same lumber that my great-grandfather used more than 100 years ago. I think that respect for the craftsmen and craftswomen of the past, and for the wood they used, make a difference in each new piece I create.”

You can see more of Pauly’s cabins on The Rustic Way’s Facebook page. (via Twisted Sifter)

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