sculpture

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Art

A Decade of Daniel Arsham’s Material Explorations Opens at Amsterdam’s MOCO Museum

January 29, 2019

Sasha Bogojev

Daniel Arsham, "Hidden Figure" (2011), all images by Sasha Bogojev

Daniel Arsham, “Hidden Figure” (2011), all images by Sasha Bogojev

Connecting Time is an exhibition that spans a decade of work by Daniel Arsham (previously), and was organized in collaboration with Galerie Ron Mandos and Perrotin for MOCO Museum in Amsterdam. In addition to the debut of Calcified Room and a specially designed iteration of Amethyst Ball Cavern, is one of the iconic pieces Hidden Figure (2011) from the Elastic Walls series. The piece is constructed from fiberglass, paint, and joint compound, and is a classic example of the artist’s ongoing play with the perception of physical space in addition to his experimentation with material properties.

Arsham continually challenges the notion of what 3-dimensional art should be by creating the illusion of familiar materials or architectural elements performing in unusual ways. Pieces like Corner Knot (2008) and Falling Clock (2012) are prime examples of this way of working, and are positioned opposite of each other in the artist’s 10-year showcase.

"Corner Knot" (2008) and "Falling Clock" (2012)

“Corner Knot” (2008) and “Falling Clock” (2012)

Arsham’s entire series of sculptural pieces from his fictional archaeology series dominates the basement of the museum. This body of work was directly inspired by the artist’s visit to Easter Island several years ago, and the uncertainty about the real history of the island’s monumental sculptures. Inspired by the idea of creating future artifacts, Arsham developed a whole range of different procedures and techniques to create eroded and decayed versions of po culture items. Using geological substances such as volcanic ash, rose quartz, obsidian, and glacial rock, he continuously adds new items to this opus, each time constructing the latest artifact with different material.

Although he has previously taken objects from areas that he is personally attached to, such as sports, music, or pop culture, the show in Amsterdam includes a new series of works created from flat, printed works such as books, magazines, and food packaging. You can follow Arsham’s latest work, projects, and releases on Instagram, and visit Connecting Time until September 30th, 2019 at MOCO Museum in Amsterdam. Another solo exhibition, Static Mythologies, is also on view in Amsterdam at Galerie Ron Mandos through March 16, 2019.

"Hidden Figure" (detail)

"Basketball Rack" (detail)

“Basketball Rack” (detail)

"Basketball Rack"

“Basketball Rack”

"Miami Heat Jacket"

“Miami Heat Jacket”

"Miami Heat Jacket" (detail)

“Miami Heat Jacket” (detail)

"Arm Spanning Corner"

“Arm Spanning Corner”

"Calcified Room" (2019)

“Calcified Room” (2019)

"Amethyst Ball Cavern"

“Amethyst Ball Cavern”

"Amethyst Ball Cavern" (detail)

“Amethyst Ball Cavern” (detail)

 

 



Art Craft

A Life-Size Skeleton and Organs Crocheted from Wool by Shanell Papp

January 24, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Canadian artist Shanell Papp crochets forms associated with the human figure, notably crocheting a life-size skeleton stuffed with colorful removable organs. The work was created in 2005 from wool yarn, and includes everything from a soft crocheted heart to ten hollow phalanges. After working for four months on the skeleton, and four months on the organs, the final work was displayed on an actual mortuary gurney. If you are interested in more handmade anatomy, check out Dr. Karen Norberg’s scientifically-accurate soft sculpture of the human brain. (via designboom)

 

 

 



Art

Pixelated Wooden Faces by Gil Bruvel Reveal Abstract Color Explorations When Exhibited in Verso

January 24, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"In the Green," all images via Gil Bruvel

“In the Green,” all images via Gil Bruvel

For his unusual figurative sculptures artist Gil Bruvel splits lengths of lumber into manageable sticks which he arranges and paints in bright shades of blues, greens, and reds. On one side, the wooden pieces configure into faces at rest in peaceful expressions, while on the reverse they remain jumbled and abstract. The pixelated sculptures appear like sophisticated pieces of three-dimensional pin art that reveal permanent images of faces, instead of temporary impressions of a nose or hand. Pieces from the series, Bending the Lines, will be on display in Federic Got Gallery’s booth as a part of the LA Art Show from January 23 – 27, 2019. You can see more of Bruvel’s sculptures on his website and Instagram.

In the Green

In the Green

In the Green

In the Green

Equanimity

Equanimity

Equanimity

Equanimity

Symbiosis

Symbiosis

Divided

Divided

Divided

Divided

Symbiosis

Symbiosis

Symbiosis

Symbiosis

 

 

 



Art

Mountainous Landforms Top Carved Book Configurations by Guy Laramée

January 23, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Historia das Americas II

Historia das Americas II

Guy Laramée (previously) erects topographic specimen from collections of vintage books. His carved sculptures imitate the mountains of knowledge once physically collected in books rather than compiled via digital means. In this series of new works from 2017-2018 the Montreal-based artist incorporates traditional methods of book organization as integral parts of the sculptures— such as box set containers, simple wood stands, and metal bookends reminiscent of public libraries. Laramée’s work is included in the group exhibition “Unbound” at TwoRivers Gallery in Prince George, British Columbia through March 31, 2019. You can see more of his sculptural takes on vintage anthologies on his website.

Historia das Americas II

Historia das Americas II

Boa Esperança

Boa Esperança

Boa Esperança

Boa Esperança

Whale

Whale

Chapada

Chapada

Whale

Whale

L'Énigme

L’Énigme

L'Énigme

L’Énigme

Chapada

Chapada

 

 



Art

Dried Grass and Branches are Woven and Stitched into Delicate Sculptural Drawings by Kazuhito Takadoi

January 18, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Kazuhito Takadoi uses natural materials combined with traditional Japanese art supplies like sumi ink and washi paper to make delicate sculptural works that tread between two and three dimensions. Takadoi cultivates and then gathers grass, leaves, and twigs from his garden to form the meticulous structures that comprise his dimensional drawings. Though these organic findings are secured in place through weaving and stitching, they continue to evolve as they dry and mature, changing in flexibility and color.

The artist, who is originally from Nagoya, Japan, trained in agriculture and horticulture in Japan, the US, and the UK before studying art and garden design in the UK. Takadoi is now based in Britain and is represented by jaggedart gallery in London. His work will be on view at Saatchi Gallery as part of Collect, an international modern craft and design fair, on view in London from February 23 until March 3, 2019.

 

 



Craft Food

Families of Carrots, Miniature Mountains, and Baguettes Crafted from Needle Felted Wool by Hanna Dovhan

January 16, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Ukraine-based designer Hanna Dovhan (previously) consistently delights us with her needle felted wool sculptures of anthropomorphic mushroom pairs, clutched baguettes, and miniature mountain families. The works are each decorated with a tiny smiling face, and sometimes paired with a micro mustache. You can see new sets of cuddly creatures by following her on Instagram or visiting her Etsy shop Woolsculpture.

 

 



Art

Head Instructor: A New Glass Sculpture by Thomas Medicus Analyzes the Human Mind Through Four Anamorphic Images

January 15, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Thomas Medicus (previously) is a master of illusion. The Austria-based artist builds sculptures from segments of painted and hand-cut glass which present a different image depending on which angle you view the rotating cube. In his most recent work, Head Instructor, concept follows form. The piece presents several viewpoints of an androgynous human’s head, showcasing the hidden thoughts and viewpoints that might occupy one’s mind.

“In Head Instructor I tried to show that when you look at a person, a brain, or the world, what you will see always depends on your perspective and the method you use,” he explains to Colossal. “There are always facets that will remain fragmented or hidden when you only approach from only one side.” You can take a look behind-the-scenes of how one of his hand-painted panels is constructed on Vimeo, and see more of his perspective-altering work on Instagram and Facebook. (via Colossal Submissions)