shoes

Posts tagged
with shoes



Craft Design

Gummy Bears, Sugary Cereal, and Sushi Converted into Playful Apparel by Nicole McLaughlin

March 17, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Nicole McLaughlin

Nicole McLaughlin (previously) ensures she always has a snack at her fingertips—or stashed in a puffy vest or lining the top of her sandals. The former Reebok graphic designer creates upcycled clothing, footwear, and household items from pouches of gummy candy, old fleece jackets, and even inflated bags of popcorn. Often prominently displaying logos, McLaughlin’s projects provide a humorous take on branding and fashion trends.

The playful pieces also are part of the designer’s years-long efforts toward creating environmentally aware fashion. “I would go to thrift stores and try to find something that I could make something new out of,” McLaughlin told WWD of her initial desire to create her converted, and now edible, apparel. “This inspired my philosophy to be more sustainable and I adopted being sustainable into my practices as a designer, because there’s so much to be done here.” To see what she thinks up next, follow McLaughlin on Instagram.

 

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Photography

Unusual Details Upend Brooke DiDonato’s Seemingly Straightforward Photographs

July 24, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Brooke DiDonato (previously) twists bodies into unusual shapes that lead the viewer’s eye in transfixing circles. The Brooklyn-based artist creates seemingly tranquil images with soft colors and soothing textures. But surreal details, like a pair of stilettos on the sidewalk that melt into a patent leather puddle, or a gender-bending figure seated on a bench, make each photograph an object of intrigue. DiDonato exhibits her work widely and most recently showed at Le Purgatoire in Paris. Stay up to date on the photographer’s eye-catching and thought-provoking work via Instagram.

 

 



Art

Muralist Kitt Bennett Paints Pavement With Sprawling Giants

April 13, 2019

Andrew LaSane

All images via Kitt Bennett

From parking lots to skate parks, Melbourne-based artist Kitt Bennett paints large illustrative murals on an unconventional surface: the ground. The almost literal “street” art is best seen from a bird’s eye view and features people, objects, and skeletons that contort around their respective spaces as if they fell from the sky.

Bennett’s murals are painted much like the walls of a house. The artist uses large buckets of paint and rollers to cover the large areas and adds shading, highlights, and outlines to create the illusion of depth. A statement on his website explains that Bennett’s work is “often conceptually driven as exploring topics of individuality, existence and the mysterious phenomena that surrounds us inspires him to create art.” To see more of his ground paintings and other works on more traditional surfaces, follow Kitt Bennett on Instagram.

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Craft Design

Subverted Consumer Goods Become Wearable New Apparel

April 1, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

During the weekday, Nicole McLaughlin works as a graphic designer at Reebok. But after hours her relationship to branded apparel and personal accessories takes a different creative turn. McLaughlin uses a wide variety of recognizable consumer goods to form totally new products. Often focusing on footwear, McLaughlin has formed slip-ons out of tennis balls and Levi’s waistband patches, and sandals from eBay packaging tape and IKEA bag handles. Additional creations range from an umbrella of The North Face puffy coats to foldable chairs comprised of athlete’s Gatorade bottles and foam sports fan hands.

The artist chops up and subverts the original functionality of these recognizable products and brands, but also is always careful to maintain—and often repeat—visible logos while she gives each item a new meaning and use. McLaughlin documents her creations in a closely cropped, plain manner that calls to mind images cataloged for an anthropological study. You can see more of her fashion interventions on Instagram, and keep an eye on her online store for functional pieces, all of which are currently sold out.

 

 



Design Illustration

Illustrations Transform Nike Air Maxes Into Concepts That Pay Homage to Their History

December 5, 2018

Andrew LaSane

Images courtesy of Rosie Lee on Behance

London-based creative agency Rosie Lee took the original design inspirations for iconic sneakers and turned them into conceptual sculptures that architects and sneakerheads will especially appreciate. Paying homage to the Centre Pompidou, the museum in Paris that inspired legendary Nike designer Tinker Hatfield to create the Nike Air Max 1 in the late-1980s, the team at Rosie Lee transformed the iconic shoe into a 3D model of its Parisian inspiration. The illustration closely resembles the inside-out architectural elements that Renzo Piano, Richard Rogers, and Gianfranco Franchini used when designing and building the complex in the 1970s.

The creative team also created 3D illustrations for two other Air Max models: the Nike Air Max 90 and the Nike Air Max 95. The Air Max 90 concept is built entirely out of speakers and rigging as a nod to the culture of record crate diggers (“early adopters” of the sneaker model, according to Rosie Lee), while the Air Max 95 illustration was made to resemble the anatomy of a human foot since that’s where the sneaker’s designer, Sergio Lozano, found inspiration over 23 years ago.

Rosie Lee works on interdisciplinary retail design, branding, and digital projects. You can find more of their latest work on Behance and Instagram, and view their full portfolio on the Rosie Lee website.

 

 



Art

Sliced Footwear Arranged in Uncanny Configurations by Sakir Gokcebag

September 4, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Turkish-born visual artist Şakir Gökçebağ (previously) deconstructs everyday objects, often eradicating their original functionality in order to form humorous installations. His works are created from items one might find around the house such as hula hoops, brooms, toilet paper rolls, and pairs of worn shoes. The later series of altered footwear spans more than 15 years, and has been installed in surreal arrangements both inside and out of the gallery.

For these pieces Gökçebağ chops the front toe off of neutral-toned work boots and other sturdy footwear. He then arranges the pieces in circles, rows, and parallel lines that split elevated platforms. The installations appear digitally composed, and playing a trick on the viewer as they attempt to decode the visual manipulation. Gökçebağ has lived and worked in Hamburg, Germany since 2001. You can see more of his oddly arranged objects, like this belt that has been sliced and folded to appear like a ribbon, on his Instagram.

 

 

 

 



Art

Crystallized Ballet Slippers and Soccer Cleats by Alice Potts

August 3, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Royal College of Art student Alice Potts grows crystals on shirts, slippers, and various athletic wear from a common yet unlikely source—sweat. The London-based artist encrusts wearables in natural formations that elevate the sporty objects into one-of-a-kind sculptures. The series, titled PERSPIRE, aims to show how we could grow our own accessories, rather than having them manufactured.

“Every human is unique, and so is the sweat they produce, encapsulating our health, wellbeing and identity,” Potts told Dazed. “In the future I’m keen to develop the idea and use it to explore sustainable processes within fashion.”

You can see more of her crystallized shoes and garments on Instagram.