short film

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with short film



Animation

A Gardener Spreads Joy Through the Cultivation of Lemon Trees in a New Animated Short

November 21, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Laymun is a collaborative short film by directors Catherine Prowse (previously) and Hannah Quinn which follows the story of a gardener in a Middle Eastern war zone. The woman cultivates and spreads lemon trees as a way to bring hope to herself and community. The sets for the film were crafted from crumpled and sculpted paper over the course of six months, and the cut-out paper characters were scanned and added in digitally after the shoot. The directors chose this medium as a way to more accurately depict the tone they wished to bring across in their film.

“It was really important to us not to sentimentalize the ongoing violence in the Middle East and to communicate the precariousness of our character’s situation,” explain Prowse and Quinn. “So we explored the qualities of paper as a medium, crumpling and tearing to create a sense of fragility and vulnerability.”

The animated short has won several awards including the Royal Television Society Undergraduate Animation Award 2018, the International Animation prize at the Cardiff Mini Film Festival 2018, and the Short Film Prize at the World of Women Film Fair Middle East, among many others. You can see more of Prowse’s work on Vimeo and website in addition to Quinn’s work on her website. (via Short of the Week)

 

 

 



Animation Art

4D-Printed Aquatic Plants Spring to Life in “Hydrophytes” by Nicole Hone

September 17, 2018

Andrew LaSane

Using modeling software and multi-material 3D printing, industrial designer Nicole Hone created a series of 4D-printed futuristic aquatic plants, or Hydrophytes, that are as full of character as the natural organisms they mimic. In the film of the same name, the hydrophytes are activated by pneumatic inflation in water, and transform into dynamic organisms that you could swear were actually alive.

“I have always been fascinated with nature,” the designer tells Colossal. “It inspires my design ideas and aesthetic. For this project, I became particularly interested in botany and marine life. I was amazed by the way sea creatures and corals moved, and I wanted to reflect similar qualities in my designs.” While working on her Master of Design Innovation thesis at Victoria University of Wellington, Hone learned about plans to redesign the National Aquarium in New Zealand. She thought that it would be interesting to develop a “future-focused exhibition” with moving models as an interactive installation for visitors. She began making test prints and discovered that the models moved best in water, which eventually became the pieces used in Hydrophytes.

Hone explains that software was used to create the shape, surface texture, and internal structures for the Hydrophytes. One benefit of the 3D printing system is that there can be a varying degree of hardness for the parts, but the machine can still handle printing them as a seamless object. During printing the works are encased in a support material, which Hone has to then painstakingly remove (sometimes a 4-hour process) by soaking them in water and using a toothpick. After cleaning, air is passed through the CGOs (computer generated objects) and they are placed in the underwater environments.

“They can respond to external forces such as gravity, water ripples or currents, and interaction with people or other 3D prints in real life,” Hone said. “Their man-made composite materials behave uncannily similar to living organisms.”

She went onto explain that each Hydrophyte has a unique character that is defined by both their style of movement and appearance. The colored lights that illuminate the printed plants were chosen to “complement each personality and amplify the emotive qualities of the film,” and the functions of each plant were inspired by the effects of climate change on marine species. “As the 4D printing experiments developed from abstract shapes into more plant-like models, their appearance and movement helped me think of which function would best suit each character,” she added. It’s fascinating to see the intersection of art and technology produce such a unique collection of objects. To view more of what Hone has created with her research, visit her website. (via Designboom)

 

 



Animation

Stop Motion Films by Kirsten Lepore and Nix + Gerber Produced Entirely in the Space of a Car Trunk

September 13, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

In a new ad campaign for the 2019 MINI Countryman, MINI USA invited artist duo Nix + Gerber (previously) and animator Kirsten Lepore (previously) to produce stop motion films in the vehicle’s cargo space. Nix + Gerber explore space in their film Camping, while Lepore goes deep under the sea in her work Underwater. Nix + Gerber utilized two dioramas for their models of Earth and the Moon, creating each of the terrains with foam, wire, flock, dirt and rocks. Lepore’s ocean-based love story was built entirely from paper, with an overlay of plexiglass to give the set that underwater shimmer. The short films explore the 2019 vehicle’s slogan “Created in a Countryman,” examining what sorts of vast worlds might be constructed in the confines of a MINI’s trunk.

Camping will screen on Monday, September 17, 2018 at the BAM Rose Cinema at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, while Underwater will screen at The Other Art Fair in Los Angeles from October 24 – 28, 2018. You can view more of Lepore’s animations on Vimeo, and see an extensive selection of Nix + Gerber’s miniature dioramas on their website.

 

 



Animation

ENOUGH: Humorous Stop Motion Film Examines Our Inner Desire to Lose Control

September 5, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Swedish director and animator Anna Mantzaris has a penchant for the darkly humous as seen in her 2012 film But Milk is Important. Her recent short ENOUGH was made during her first year at the Royal College of Art where she graduated earlier this year. The stop motion film follows several kind-looking characters as they snap during everyday occurrences such as frustrating board meetings, dealing with demanding customers, or just narrowly missing the bus.

“I wanted to have quite soft and sympathetic characters, to contrast with the less soft actions,”Mantzaris explained to Directors Notes. “I also liked them to feel a bit awkward and uncomfortable, just as we can feel sometimes in social situations. I also wanted it to feel a bit grey and boring, to enhance the feeling of an everyday life that we sometimes want to break out from.”

The funny animation is a cathartic release of the darkness we carry bottled up inside, and showcases what might happen if you finally let yourself lose control. The London-based director recently worked on Wes Anderson’s film Isle of Dogs and has won several awards for her films including the Walt Disney Award for Best Graduation Film and the Audience Award at Ottawa International Animation Festival. You can see more of her short films on her website and Vimeo. (via Short of the Week)

 

 



Animation

Short Animation TINK Takes You on a Lovely Rube Goldberg-esque Adventure

August 29, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

TINK is a colorful animation by motion design studio Mr. Kaplin that showcases the intricate workings of a fictional Rube Goldberg-like machine. At just 45 seconds long, the very short film takes a close look at several oddly shaped ball bearings, like an oblong one that leaps vertically through a rectangular box, or a line of cubed, metallic pieces that roll in single file down a bright yellow slope. The project evolved from a series of animation experiments created by the London-based studio this past April. You can view more of their animations on Instagram and Vimeo.  (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

 

 



Animation

Billions of Color Changing Particles Create Amorphous Waves in a New Art Film by Maxim Zhestkov 

August 14, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Volumes is a new 4K experimental art film by artist and director Maxim Zhestkov (previously) which explores the laws of nature through the interactions of billions of spherical particles. As the digitally produced elements collide they transform into a series of brilliant colors, morphing from black and grey orbs to pink, blue, and white balls and back again. The spheres combine to create sweeping waves that disperse and meld back together in large, amorphous forms. You can view more of the director’s projects on Vimeo, Instagram, and Behance.

 

 



Animation

A Five-Part Stop Motion Anthology Tests the Limits of Short Film

June 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

This Magnificent Cake! is a new stop motion animation by Belgium-based filmmaker pair Emma De Swaef and Marc James Roels (previously) which tests the physical limits of short film. The 44-minute, 5-chapter anthology is just over the cut for what can be considered a short film, yet is far more condensed then one that is a traditional longer format. Described as a “mid-length film,” the work follows five different characters through colonial Africa in the late 19th-century which include a “troubled king, a middle-aged Pygmy working in a luxury hotel, a failed businessman on an expedition, a lost porter, and a young army deserter.”

The film premiered at this year’s Cannes Film Festival and will be screened at the upcoming Animafest Zagreb 2018, Annecy Festival 2018, and Anima Mundi Brazil 2018. You can see the trailer for the animation above, and more short films by de Swaef and Roels on Vimeo. (via Short of the Week)

 

 

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