stone carving

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Art

Miniature Architectural Spaces Nestle into Carved Chunks of Raw Marble

May 25, 2021

Grace Ebert

“Tetraconch II” (2019), Faxe limestone, 38 centimeters. All images © Matthew Simmonds, shared with permission

Since antiquity, marble has been a preferred material for sculptors and architects alike because of its relative softness and the unlikelihood that it’ll shatter. British artist Matthew Simmonds (previously) fuses these two traditional forms and honors their history with his miniature models carved into hunks of the raw stone. Evoking ancient ruins and sacred architecture—most pieces aren’t modeled after specific structures—the chiseled sculptures are complete with grand archways, ornately tiled ceilings, and minuscule statues on display in their halls.

Within the spaces, Simmonds contrasts the rough, jagged edges of the stone with precise angles and detailed flourishes. “Drawing on the formal language and philosophy of architecture the work explores themes of positive and negative form, the significance of light and darkness, and the relationship between nature and human endeavor,” he says in a statement.

See more of the artist’s carved interiors, which are often less than a foot wide, on his site.

 

“Mystras” (2020), Carrara marble, 39 centimeters

Left: “Essay in Perpendicular” (2018), limestone, 42 centimeters. Right: “Window” (2020), limestone, 24 centimeters

Detail of “Hidden Landscape II” (2019), Carrara marble, 180 centimeters

“Gothic Passage II” (2021), limestone, 25.5 centimeters

Left: “Single Helix II” (2019), Faxe limestone, 24 centimeters. Right: “Landscape: study” (2020), limestone, 10 centimeters

Detail of “Basilica V” (2020), Carrara marble, 170 centimeters

“Stepwell” (2020), Faxe limestone, 39 centimeters

Detail of “Stepwell” (2020), Faxe limestone, 39 centimeters

 

 



Art

Granite and Quartz Stones Are Carved to Appear Like Fabric and Clay by José Manuel Castro López

October 26, 2020

Christopher Jobson

All photos © José Manuel Castro López.

Spanish artist José Manuel Castro López (previously) transforms nondescript chunks of granite and quartz into squished and dough-like objects, as if each object morphed from solid to liquid and back again in the sculptor’s capable hands. López seems to delight in convincing the viewer that he works with stone as if it were clay. Lately, he’s begun to introduce additional objects that seem to stitch, clamp, or stretch the stones in various ways. While the pieces are obviously not as complex as a Bernini or Michelangelo, they do function as unusual and often humorous studies of various stone carving techniques. You can explore a steady stream of work old and new on his Facebook timeline. (via My Modern Met)

 

 

 



Art

Cleverly Carved Rocks Seem to Open and Flex in New Stone Sculptures by Hirotoshi Ito

May 7, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Unpolished rocks are sliced and diced in the clever sculptures of Hirotoshi Ito (previously). The Japanese artist carefully carves away sections of naturally-textured stone to create the illusion of motion or flexibility. Rocks appear to be sliced with table knives, hinged to act as velvet-lined coin purses, or unzipped to reveal mouths and miniature worlds. When Ito isn’t carving these lighthearted designs, he creates tombstones, monuments, and sculptures as the Ito Stone Shop. You can stay up to date with Ito’s art via Facebook.

 

 

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