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Photography

Otherworldly Sandstone Pillars Appear Like Totems of Billowing Fabric

June 14, 2021

Grace Ebert

All images © Zac Henderson, shared with permission

Between 140 and 180 million years ago, a cluster of Entrada Sandstone developed in a remote region of Utah. Wind, rain, and other elements have whittled down the formations over time, creating tall pillars that more closely resemble bunched fabric than ancient minerals.

For his series Draped Stone, photographer Zac Henderson documents these spectral columns, or hoodoos, that are developed when layers of hard and soft rock are worn down and produce smooth, billowing patterns as they age. Today’s structures flow in soft ripples from the walls and appear as ambiguous objects disguised by thick swaths of textiles. Henderson describes his encounter with the pillars:

It is almost as if fabric were draped over boulders to protect them from the elements. In another way, the rocks appear almost comically similar to a stereotypical ghost costume, needing only eyes to complete the ensemble. It is a strange thing for something so opposite to fabric to take on any sort of cloth-like appearance, yet here we are met with a most bizarre sort of muslin almost asking us to look underneath.

Henderson frequently travels and seeks out the unusual textures and colors of Earth’s landscapes, and you can follow his adventures on Behance and Instagram. Prints of a few pieces from Draped Stone are also available on his site.

 

 

 



Art

Miniature Architectural Spaces Nestle into Carved Chunks of Raw Marble

May 25, 2021

Grace Ebert

“Tetraconch II” (2019), Faxe limestone, 38 centimeters. All images © Matthew Simmonds, shared with permission

Since antiquity, marble has been a preferred material for sculptors and architects alike because of its relative softness and the unlikelihood that it’ll shatter. British artist Matthew Simmonds (previously) fuses these two traditional forms and honors their history with his miniature models carved into hunks of the raw stone. Evoking ancient ruins and sacred architecture—most pieces aren’t modeled after specific structures—the chiseled sculptures are complete with grand archways, ornately tiled ceilings, and minuscule statues on display in their halls.

Within the spaces, Simmonds contrasts the rough, jagged edges of the stone with precise angles and detailed flourishes. “Drawing on the formal language and philosophy of architecture the work explores themes of positive and negative form, the significance of light and darkness, and the relationship between nature and human endeavor,” he says in a statement.

See more of the artist’s carved interiors, which are often less than a foot wide, on his site.

 

“Mystras” (2020), Carrara marble, 39 centimeters

Left: “Essay in Perpendicular” (2018), limestone, 42 centimeters. Right: “Window” (2020), limestone, 24 centimeters

Detail of “Hidden Landscape II” (2019), Carrara marble, 180 centimeters

“Gothic Passage II” (2021), limestone, 25.5 centimeters

Left: “Single Helix II” (2019), Faxe limestone, 24 centimeters. Right: “Landscape: study” (2020), limestone, 10 centimeters

Detail of “Basilica V” (2020), Carrara marble, 170 centimeters

“Stepwell” (2020), Faxe limestone, 39 centimeters

Detail of “Stepwell” (2020), Faxe limestone, 39 centimeters

 

 



Art

Precisely Arranged Stones Coil and Surge Across the Land in Jon Foreman's Mesmeric Works

December 2, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Jon Foreman, shared with permission

A scroll through Jon Foreman’s Instagram proves just how prolific the Wales-based artist has been this year—he’s collaborated with artist James Brunt (previously) on a few projects, too. From coils arranged in gradients to whirling patterns embedded in the sand, Foreman’s land art sprawls across beaches and grassy patches in an impressive number of locations. Each work is precise in composition, perfectly matching size, hue, and shape into hypnotic works that contrast the man-made construction with their organic backdrops.

Because the outdoor projects are ephemeral in nature, Foreman (previously) offers prints of most pieces in his shop.

 

 

 

 



Art

Lustrous Strips of Glass Bisect Debris, Bricks, and Semi-Precious Stones in Ramon Todo's Sculptures

October 16, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Debris” (2016), debris and layered glass. All images courtesy of Art Front Gallery, © Keiso Kioku, shared with permission

Between gnarly chunks of concrete, basalt pillars, and smooth rounds of lapis lazuli, Ramon Todo (previously) positions sleek segments of layered glass. The Tokyo-born artist splices fragments of found objects that otherwise would be regarded as refuse, like a crumbling brick from Iizuka City or coal waste, to repurpose the existing material with a lustrous embellishment.

Whether volcanic rock or chunks of demolished architecture, the resulting juxtapositions carry the original history, although they’re presented anew. “The characteristics of the place. The uniqueness of the place. Like the memories of the place and time,” the artist says in an interview about a recent solo show at Art Front Gallery in Tokyo. “I use the rocks, debris, Bota (stone similar to coal) for my works believing they have such memories inside. I used the glasses as material in the middle to peek into the time and the history of inside the rocks.”

Find more of Todo’s textured sculptures on Artsy, and see where his work is headed next on Art Front’s site.

 

(2015), basalt and glass

(2015), basalt and glass

“Debris 267703” (2016), debris and glass, 23 4/5 × 7 7/10 × 5 3/5 inches

Top: “Debris – 267411” (2014), debris and glass, 8 1/10 × 23 3/5 × 7 1/10 inches. Left: “o.T-GS” (2018) stone and layered glass, 11 × 16 1/2 × 8 3/10 inches. Right: “o.T. -dtk267801″ (2016), stone from Datekan and glass, 7 1/5 × 7 1/5 × 7 inches

(2015), basalt and glass

“Afghanistan” (2017), Lapis lazuli and glass, 7/10 × 2 1/2 × 1 3/5 inches

“Chikuho Coal waste #15” (2020), coal waste from Chikuho and glass, 12 3/5 × 12 1/10 × 5 3/5 inches

“Chikuho Red Brick” (2020), brick pieces collected from Iizuka City and glass, 7 1/5 × 4 2/5 × 2 2/5 inches

 

 



Art

Stones, Leaves, and Shells Whorl in Hypnotic Land Art by Jon Foreman

April 26, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Whirling Colour” (2019), Freshwater West, Pembrokeshire. All images © Jon Foreman

Jon Foreman arranges his seashell coils and stone gradients knowing that they’ll be washed away by the tide or kicked over by passersby. The artist’s ephemeral land art is hypnotic and entrancing in its precision, arranged in perfectly concentric circles and exacting compositions depressed in the sand. His large-scale pieces transform blank beaches and forest expanses into artworks that evidence both environmental diversity and continuity.

Based in Wales, the artist began creating his nature-based work while in college. Since then, his land art has ranged from minimal stone sculptures to sweeping sand mandalas, and each project has its own entrancing motif. “Repeat processes are always very therapeutic and this is a good example of that, getting lost in the process is an important part of land art,” Foreman recently wrote on Instagram.

If you don’t have the opportunity to see one of the artist’s highly composed pieces in person, pick up a print from his shop. (via Juxtapoz)

“II Ad Unum” (2019), Freshwater West, Pembrokeshire

“Confluere” (2018), Art of Balance Exhibition, Summerhall, Edinburgh

Left: Freshwater West, Pembrokeshire. Right: “Nether” (2019), Freshwater West, Pembrokeshire

 

 



Design

A Natural-Stone Mosaic Facade Punctuated by Dramatic Opal Windows in a New Building by OMA

March 25, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © OMA

In the developing city of Gwanggyo located about 25 kilometers south of Seoul, a high-end Korean department store stands out amongst gray office buildings and other concrete structures. Designed by OMA/Chris van Duijn, the Galleria shopping center features a mosaic facade of neutral-toned stones cut into exact triangles. A series of geometric, opal windows offer those passing through the dome-like hallways a look at the burgeoning city’s activities.

OMA said in a release that the building is inspired in part by the nearby Suwon Gwanggyo Lake Park, an urban green space that surrounds a small body of water. Complete with a rooftop garden, the structure has designated space for consumers to shop and for cultural activities that are open to the public.

The international firm also is leading the redesign for the New Museum in New York City, a project that will replace the current building with a 60,000-square-foot structure made of laminated glass and metal mesh. Its work on nhow Amsterdam RAI Hotel even garnered a recent nomination for Golden Amsterdam Architectural Prize 2020, which is bestowed annually by the Amsterdam Centre for Architecture. To follow OMA’s upcoming projects, head to Instagram. (via designboom)

 

 

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