street photography

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Illustration Photography

Phone Buddies Lurk and Ooze Out of Screens in Embellished Photos by Andrew Rae and Ruskin Kyle

November 21, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Dripping blobs of oily black, cosmic haze, and octopus tentacles emerge from the screens of smartphone users on the streets of London. Illustrator Andrew Rae teamed up with street photographer Ruskin Kyle to add some visual flair to people immersed in their electronic devices. Some of the protagonists are simply standing on the street using their phones, while other have paired their device usage with competing activities like dog-walking and ramen-eating.

“I always go for a walk on Hampstead Heath in the mornings for inspiration and I found myself nearly bumping into people on their phones,” Rae tells Colossal. Because many people in the area also are out with their dogs, “it started me thinking about the phones as if they are little pets or creatures that they are carrying in their hands.”

Rae shares that the idea percolated over time, and in conversation with his photographer friend, the pair realized the potential in the concept. Initially, Rae tried to completely replace the phones with illustrations, but he then decided to incorporate the physical technology as the source, or a part of, of the imagined creatures. In developing each character, Rae worked from some tried-and-true shapes and concepts from his larger illustration practice, and let each one develop organically.

To keep up with new embellishments of tech-absorbed passersby, follow Andrew Rae on Instagram and see more of Ruskin Kyle’s street photography on the platform as well. Just don’t bump into a stranger while you scroll through! (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Photography

Quirky Juxtapositions Capture Imperfect Human Moments in Photographs by Shin Noguchi

September 27, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

All photographs shared with permission of the artist

Photographer Shin Noguchi spends his time, camera in hand, in Japan’s public spaces, observing and seeking out candid moments that reflect the humorous, heartbreaking, and bizarre realities of the human experience. Noguchi shares with Colossal that he values the existential affirmation of human life that he gleans from his work, accepting his and others’ situations as they are. The artist shies away from the term ‘street photographer’, as he views his work as more of a sociological experience.

“To shoot people with a camera is, for me, is like saying hello,” the photographer explains. “Sometime I use my mouth for it, sometime I use my eyes, and sometimes my camera, that’s it. I just really enjoy ‘talking’ or making conversation with people in the street, and if I use a camera for it, I always use the viewfinder; I never use hip-shots to hide myself.”

Noguchi tells Colossal that he was raised in a very creative household, and quickly fell in love with photography as a teen when his father gave him an old Fujica camera. Of the innumerable memorable moments Noguchi has encountered over the years, two memories stand out in particular.

After an exhausting day one February, in which the photographer had spent four hours shooting during heavy snowfall in Kamakura, he passed by a life-size mascot of a Kentucky Fried Chicken store, with the snow-crested Colonel Sanders offering a quiet, seemingly reassuring smile. On another winter’s day, Noguchi observed a craftsman carrying dozens of shoji (paper-paned interior doors) out of a Shibakoen temple for routine re-covering. Growing tired from his repetitive labors, the man finally punched a hole in the paper to make the shoji easier to carry.

You can follow along with Noguchi’s visual discoveries on Instagram and explore his extensive portfolio on his website. (via The Guardian)

 

 



Photography

A New Book Reveals a Colorful Side to Vivian Maier’s Renowned Street Photography

November 14, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Location and date unknown. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location and date unknown. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Nanny and self-taught photographer Vivian Maier (1926–2009) (previously here and here) kept nearly 150,000 photographic images, including street photography and self-portraits, hidden from the world until an estate sale in 2007 revealed a large bulk of her secretive hobby. Since 2010 her photographs have been widely exhibited in galleries and museums across the world, and were the subject of the 2013 documentary Finding Vivian Maier, which was nominated for an Academy Award.

Although her mostly Chicago and New York-based photographs have become infamous in the decade since their discovery, her color images have been less prevalent due to the technical challenges involved in their development and recovery. This month the largest monograph of her full-color photographs was published by Harper Collins, which includes images pulled from the roughly 40,000 Ektachrome color slides spanning the last 30 years of her life. Vivian Maier: The Color Work explores over 150 of her colorful images with details that have been gathered about her story and photographic process. The book also features a forward by photographer Joel Meyerowitz and text by Colin Westerbeck, a former curator of photography at the Art Institute of Chicago.

“Maier was a self-invented polymath of a photographer,” writes Westerbeck in the book. “The one advantage Maier gained from keeping her photography to herself was an exemption from contradiction and condescension. She didn’t have to worry about either the orthodoxy or the approval of her peers.”

Vivian Maier: The Color Work was created in partnership with Howard Greenberg Gallery in New York City, who will be presenting an exhibition of the same title opening November 14, 2018 and running through January 5, 2019. Several of the color photographs included in the exhibition will be presented for the first time. You can see more of Maier’s black and white and color photography on this portfolio site dedicated to her collection, and you can purchase a copy of the new book on Amazon. (via Chicago Magazine)

Self-portrait, Chicago, February 1976. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Self-portrait, Chicago, February 1976. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location unknown, May 1958. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location unknown, May 1958. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location and date unknown. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location and date unknown. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

New York City, 1959. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

New York City, 1959. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location unknown, 1960. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location unknown, 1960. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Chicago, 1962. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Chicago, 1962. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location and date unknown. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Location and date unknown. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Self-portrait, Chicagoland, October 1975. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Self-portrait, Chicagoland, October 1975. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Chicagoland, 1975. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Chicagoland, 1975. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Self-portrait, Chicago, January 1979. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Self-portrait, Chicago, January 1979. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Self-portrait, 1975. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Self-portrait, 1975. © Estate of Vivian Maier, Courtesy Maloof Collection and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

From Vivian Maier: The Color Work, by Colin Westerbeck. Copyright © 2018. Images reproduced here with permission from Harper Design, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers

From Vivian Maier: The Color Work, by Colin Westerbeck. Copyright © 2018. Images reproduced here with permission from Harper Design, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers

 

 



Photography

Dramatic Perspectives Capture Uniquely Juxtaposed Beachgoers in Street Photography by Moises Levy

October 26, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Giant 1

Giant 1, all images via Moises Levy

Mexico City-based photographer and architect Moises Levy captures unique moments of human and animal interaction in his street photography, most often centered around activities at the beach. By shooting at a low angle, Levy captures slackline and tightrope walkers in the frame of someone’s legs, or a horse at just the right pace to make it seems as if a woman has walked directly underneath its snout. All of his images are backlit to create high contrast black and white images that present his figures more as silhouettes than subjects. You can see more of his beach photography on Instagram.

Funny Feet

Funny Feet

Above

Above

Trapped

Trapped

Levitation

Levitation

Horse 1

Horse 1

Hungry Dog

Hungry Dog

Top of the World

Top of the World

Horse 2

Gime Five

Gime Five

 

 



Animation Art Design

A Vast Array of Urban Street Art Aerially Photographed and Digitally Cataloged by Oddviz

October 15, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Istanbul-based collective oddviz uses photogrammetry to documents the world in three dimensions. By merging together aerial and ground-level images, the team is able to form high resolution representations of humans, landscapes, and objects to preserve their position and appearance in a web, video, or virtual reality-based medium. For their latest project, Inventory, the team captured elements from urban infrastructure that are often found covered with tags, graffiti, and stickers.

Oddviz started the project by photographing objects in their own neighborhood of Kadıköy-Istanbul, but have expanded the project internationally to include the ancient wells and fountains of Venice and Berlin, and the fire hydrants, telephone booths, utility poles and statues found during a week-long trip to Manhattan. By capturing the street culture that accumulates in public spaces, the group is protecting ephemeral materials that might never be catalogued in a museum or white-walled gallery. “Using photogrammetry, we are documenting and protecting street culture in 3-dimensions with high-resolution texture,” they explain.

The collective has created several 4k images of their collections, in addition to two videos that guide their audience through their finds in Manhattan and Venice. You can watch the videos here, and view previous works by oddviz on their websiteInstagram, and Vimeo.

"Manhattan II" (2018), diasec print, 106 x 250 cm

“Manhattan II” (2018), diasec print, 106 x 250 cm

"Manhattan I" (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

“Manhattan I” (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

"Kreuzberg I" (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

“Kreuzberg I” (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

"Kadıköy II" (2018), 90 x 150 cm

“Kadıköy II” (2018), fine art print, 90 x 150 cm

"Venice I" (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

“Venice I” (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

"Venice II" (2018), fine art print, 80 x 175 cm

“Venice II” (2018), fine art print, 80 x 175 cm

 

 



Photography

Chance Encounters Captured on Streets Around the World by Photographer Pau Buscató

March 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Pau Buscató has captured coincidental moments throughout Oslo for the last eight years, and has specifically focused on street photography for the last four. His candid images reveal an acute talent for predictive timing, often lining up shots that seem like moments of impossible fate.

Although Buscató is based in Oslo, many of his images come from large cities all over the world, including London, Barcelona, and New York City. Despite their different locations, each of these candid photos is part of the same series, a project he has titled Hopscotch in reference to the well-known children’s activity. He explains that his process is similar to this common game, as it must remain playful to present such a creative output.

“The way I like to work in street photography is not very project-friendly, because I prefer not to narrow my vision down to a certain theme, but rather stay open to anything that I might find interesting,” Buscató told Colossal. “It’s a very intuitive way of working, based on trusting my instincts and not limiting myself to preconceived ideas or themes. If there’s some consistency in my work it is because all of it comes from the same place: candid, creative and playful observation, and the intention to let an illogical dimension infiltrate into our mundane, ordinary world.”

Buscató’s upcoming solo exhibition, Hopscotch, opens this fall at Oslo-based gallery Fotografiens Hus. You can follow more of his candid moments on Instagram and Flickr. (via Ignant)

 

 



Photography

Photographer Jonathan Higbee Discovers a World of Coincidence on the Streets of New York

January 29, 2018

Christopher Jobson

All images © Jonathan Higbee.

For over a decade, photographer Jonathan Higbee has walked the streets of New York with a camera in-hand, spotting extraordinary juxtapositions and unusual moments when the world aligns for a split second in front of his lens. At times he manages to completely erase the boundaries between manufactured imagery found in billboards or signage that pollute the city streets and captures anonymous passersby who seem to live in an alternate reality.

This uncanny talent for observation has made the Missouri-born photographer a rising name in street photography where he won the World Street Photography grand prize in 2015 and a LensCulture 2016 Street Photography Award. Higbee’s work has been exhibited in group shows around the world and his photos were recently included in World Street Photography 4. You can follow more of his photography on Instagram. (via LensCulture)