street photography

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with street photography



Animation Art Design

A Vast Array of Urban Street Art Aerially Photographed and Digitally Cataloged by Oddviz

October 15, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Istanbul-based collective oddviz uses photogrammetry to documents the world in three dimensions. By merging together aerial and ground-level images, the team is able to form high resolution representations of humans, landscapes, and objects to preserve their position and appearance in a web, video, or virtual reality-based medium. For their latest project, Inventory, the team captured elements from urban infrastructure that are often found covered with tags, graffiti, and stickers.

Oddviz started the project by photographing objects in their own neighborhood of Kadıköy-Istanbul, but have expanded the project internationally to include the ancient wells and fountains of Venice and Berlin, and the fire hydrants, telephone booths, utility poles and statues found during a week-long trip to Manhattan. By capturing the street culture that accumulates in public spaces, the group is protecting ephemeral materials that might never be catalogued in a museum or white-walled gallery. “Using photogrammetry, we are documenting and protecting street culture in 3-dimensions with high-resolution texture,” they explain.

The collective has created several 4k images of their collections, in addition to two videos that guide their audience through their finds in Manhattan and Venice. You can watch the videos here, and view previous works by oddviz on their websiteInstagram, and Vimeo.

"Manhattan II" (2018), diasec print, 106 x 250 cm

“Manhattan II” (2018), diasec print, 106 x 250 cm

"Manhattan I" (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

“Manhattan I” (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

"Kreuzberg I" (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

“Kreuzberg I” (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

"Kadıköy II" (2018), 90 x 150 cm

“Kadıköy II” (2018), fine art print, 90 x 150 cm

"Venice I" (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

“Venice I” (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

"Venice II" (2018), fine art print, 80 x 175 cm

“Venice II” (2018), fine art print, 80 x 175 cm

 

 



Photography

Chance Encounters Captured on Streets Around the World by Photographer Pau Buscató

March 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Pau Buscató has captured coincidental moments throughout Oslo for the last eight years, and has specifically focused on street photography for the last four. His candid images reveal an acute talent for predictive timing, often lining up shots that seem like moments of impossible fate.

Although Buscató is based in Oslo, many of his images come from large cities all over the world, including London, Barcelona, and New York City. Despite their different locations, each of these candid photos is part of the same series, a project he has titled Hopscotch in reference to the well-known children’s activity. He explains that his process is similar to this common game, as it must remain playful to present such a creative output.

“The way I like to work in street photography is not very project-friendly, because I prefer not to narrow my vision down to a certain theme, but rather stay open to anything that I might find interesting,” Buscató told Colossal. “It’s a very intuitive way of working, based on trusting my instincts and not limiting myself to preconceived ideas or themes. If there’s some consistency in my work it is because all of it comes from the same place: candid, creative and playful observation, and the intention to let an illogical dimension infiltrate into our mundane, ordinary world.”

Buscató’s upcoming solo exhibition, Hopscotch, opens this fall at Oslo-based gallery Fotografiens Hus. You can follow more of his candid moments on Instagram and Flickr. (via Ignant)

 

 



Photography

Photographer Jonathan Higbee Discovers a World of Coincidence on the Streets of New York

January 29, 2018

Christopher Jobson

All images © Jonathan Higbee.

For over a decade, photographer Jonathan Higbee has walked the streets of New York with a camera in-hand, spotting extraordinary juxtapositions and unusual moments when the world aligns for a split second in front of his lens. At times he manages to completely erase the boundaries between manufactured imagery found in billboards or signage that pollute the city streets and captures anonymous passersby who seem to live in an alternate reality.

This uncanny talent for observation has made the Missouri-born photographer a rising name in street photography where he won the World Street Photography grand prize in 2015 and a LensCulture 2016 Street Photography Award. Higbee’s work has been exhibited in group shows around the world and his photos were recently included in World Street Photography 4. You can follow more of his photography on Instagram. (via LensCulture)

 

 



Craft Design Photography

Custom Hand-Knit Sweaters Blend Subjects into Urban Environments

January 12, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Over the last four years, photographer Joseph Ford (previously) has collaborated with friend and knitter Nina Dodd to create a project that blends models into their environments rather than having them stand out. Each subject wears a custom hand-knit sweater by Dodd that transforms their torso, partially camouflaging their body into a highly textured wall, striped running track, or for one pooch—the leaves of dense shrub.

The series, Knitted Camouflage, also features a collaboration with French street artist Monsieur Chat who painted one of his trademark cats on the wall of a derelict factory for the photographer. You can take a peek behind the scenes of Ford’s photographic projects on his Facebook and Instagram.

 

 



History Photography

A Norwegian University Student Used a Spy Camera in This Amazing Example of 19th Century Street Photography

January 2, 2018

Christopher Jobson

All images courtesy the Norwegian Folk Museum.

Fredrik Carl Mülertz Størmer is known mostly as an accomplished mathematician and physicist from Norway, but as a side hobby he was also an amateur photographer, taking to the streets of Oslo with a bulky camera secreted in his clothing to capture candid moments of unsuspecting passersby. Most of his photos were taken in the 1890s while Størmer was a 19-year-old student at the Royal Frederick University using a Stirn Concealed Vest Spy Camera, a secretive camera with a narrow lens designed to poke through a vest pocket’s buttonhole.

Størmer’s photography stands in stark contrast to portraiture of the era that consisted mainly of staid and unsmiling images against decorative backdrops. Here we see a rare view of people going about their daily lives nearly 125 years ago, often smiling and perhaps caught off guard from the young student angling for the shot. To see more of Størmer’s work head over to Norwegian Folkmuseum. (via Bored Panda)

 

 



Art Photography

Museum Patrons Accidentally Matching Artworks Photographed by Stefan Draschan

November 1, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Stefan Draschan visits museums around Europe to see not just the artwork but the people observing the artwork. In his series People Matching Artworks he patiently waits for museum-goers who unintentionally coordinate with the art they’re observing, and snaps a candid photo of the coincidence. You can follow the tumblr for this project, as well as a behind-the-scenes tumblr, and find links to Draschan’s other observational collections on his website. (via Kottke)

 

 



Photography

The Coincidence Project: Carefully Timed Photos by Denis Cherim Make You Look Twice

October 25, 2017

Christopher Jobson

As part of his ongoing series titled the Coincidence Project, photographer Denis Cherim (previously) seems to find the miraculous amongst the mundane in his exquisitely timed and positioned photos that align the world in strangely satisfying ways. Playing with perspective, scale, and certainly a bit of luck, Cherim places himself at the precise vantage point where moments of synchronicity seem to appear out of nowhere. Most recently the photographer traveled through London, Madrid, Valencia, and Plovdiv, and is now taking part in a 3-month residency in Taiwan at the Pier-2 Art Center. You can follow his work on Instagram.