surreal

Posts tagged
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Art

Surreal Architectural Collages That Float Above Serene Landscapes by Matthias Jung

October 26, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist and designer Matthias Jung (previously here and here) collages unique elements of architecture to create imaginary homes set in isolated landscapes. The works float above environments on the outskirts of civilization, appearing like a mirage above rolling plains or an arctic glacier.

The details Jung chooses for his compositions are selected based on the feelings they elicit. For example, the German designer might select latticed windows to convey a sense of coziness in a work, while including concrete to provoke a certain coldness. When combined, the homes serve as short poems, collaged emotions packaged into surreal structures.

Jung began the series of houses in early January 2015. You can view more of his past architectural collages by visiting his website gallery here.

 

 



Photography

Everyday Scenes Imbued With Surreal Mystery by Photographer Brooke DiDonato

October 23, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Brooklyn-based photographer Brooke DiDonato twists everyday scenes to include subtle elements of mystery or illusion. In her works, flowers protrude from city pipes or replace laces in a pair of dress shoes, while disembodied arms reach out from a wall of dense foliage. Each work suggests that there is something missing from the scene, a specific peculiarity that’s hard to pinpoint.

“The bulk of my images are set in real locations, but the characters in them are often exaggerated or imagined,” DiDonato told Colossal. “I’m interested in blending these different elements together and delivering them through a medium that was traditionally thought of as a way to archive our realities.”

DiDonato also creates videos that has the same dreamy perspective present in her static images. To see more of her work visit her website or Instagram.

 

 



Art

Surreal Drawings Created From Ballpoint Pen and Embroidery by Nuria Riaza

August 25, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Spanish artist Nuria Riaza uses bright blue ballpoint ink to create drawings of segmented faces and other surreal scenes, pieces that capture an expressive detail most would not associate with the everyday office supply. Riaza has been attracted to the medium since she was five or six, and fully dedicated herself to working with ballpoint pens since she was around 21-years-old.

The process is one of her favorite aspects of the medium, losing herself in the many hours it takes to finish each drawing. In addition to the blue ink, Riaza sometimes incorporates embroidery to give a warmth to the work, adding small details of gold or red thread to emphasize the surreal qualities of specific drawings. Despite branching out to experiment with other mediums, these elements are only ever a small part of her practice, ballpoint pen continuing to serve as her main inspiration.

“I recommend that you try and use the pen as something more than a writing tool—to eat it as if it were a toothpick, to make fake tattoos with it, to use them as rollers in your hair, and to draw a lot,” says Riaza in her artist statement. “It’s something almost therapeutic, like how people draw mandalas, and you learn that the mistakes are also beautiful on paper.”

You can see more of her blue drawings and peaks into future projects on her Instagram. (via Creators Project)

 

 



Art

River Stones with Pouches Unzip to Reveal Hidden Scenes and Objects

July 24, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Japanese artist Hirotoshi Ito’s sculptural works are a surreal contradiction of materials that seemingly shouldn’t exist, and yet here they are. The smooth stones of variable shape and size are each embedded with zippers that open to reveal hidden objects like collections of coins or marbles, while some of his more popular works incorporate a rather sinister toothy mouth. Ito finds the rocks in a riverbed near his home and works with the natural shape of each object to form the pouch and scene inside.

Ito had a solo show last month at Little High Gallery in Tokyo called “Mysterious Stone!” and you can see more of his ongoing stone carving work on Facebook. (via Geyser of Awesome)

 

 



Photography

The Serendipitous Clouds and Faux Reflections of Photographer Kanghee Kim

July 12, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Kanghee Kim juxtaposes day-to-day moments to create scenes that peek into an alternate world, subtly placing faux reflections in coils of cable or in the streak of a rear windshield. The Brooklyn-based photographer’s manipulations come from the desire to manifest magical moments in the mundane, using post-production edits as an additional artistic medium within her work.

“I started to think of [my photography] as a painting and allow the post-production process to act as a kind of mark-making,” said Kanghee to i-D. “Photoshop is widely used in commercial photography to refine the details and make the images look flawless.”

Kanghee decided that she wanted to do the opposite with the tool, keeping the flaws that appeared in her images rather than editing them out. The works’ small imperfections highlight the human quality of each combined moment rather than glossing over it. You can view more of the photographer’s softly edited images and unexpected reflections on her website and Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Art

New Oil Paintings That Trace Fictitious Memories by Joshua Flint

July 4, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Towards the door we never opened, oil on linen, 45″ x 28″

Joshua Flint (previously) paints scenes in relationship to the way we access old memories in our mind, blurring motions and obscuring the identities of his works’ subjects. The visual narratives are not linear, but rather create a surreal mash-up of landscapes and worlds, sourcing inspiration from digitized museum archives, vintage shops, and social media.

“The paintings fluctuate between the familiar and the unknown while simultaneously including the past and present,” said Flint in an artist statement. “By rearranging the hierarchy of elements the paintings become fictions that allow countless interpretations. Layered into works are references to liminality, ecological issues, neuroscience, psychological states, and the history of painting, among others.”

Flint has upcoming solo exhibitions at Seager / Gray Gallery in Mill Valley, California and Robert Lange Studios in Charleston, South Carolina this fall. You can see more of his oil paintings and studio sketches on his Instagram.

The World Between, oil on canvas, 48" x 48"

The World Between, oil on canvas, 48″ x 48″

The Guest, oil on wood panel, 36" x 36"

The Guest, oil on wood panel, 36″ x 36″

Carousel, oil on wood panel, 36" X 48"

Carousel, oil on wood panel, 36″ X 48″

The Volunteers, oil on wood panel, 30" x 40"

The Volunteers, oil on wood panel, 30″ x 40″

Threshold, oil on wood panel, 36" X 48"

Threshold, oil on wood panel, 36″ X 48″

The Assistant, oil on wood panel, 36" x 36"

The Assistant, oil on wood panel, 36″ x 36″

Future Present, oil on wood panel, 12" x 12"

Future Present, oil on wood panel, 12″ x 12″

The Projectionist, oil on wood panel,12" x 12"

The Projectionist, oil on wood panel,12″ x 12″

 

 



Art

Anatomical Cross-Sections of Human Heads Reveal a Menagerie of Found Objects

July 3, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Chicago-based artist duo Edwige Massart and Xavier Wynn (previously) sculpt cross-sections of human heads that are organized into compartments of tiny objects. The series began several years ago as an intersection of sorts involving Massart’s personal collection of found objects that she began at the age of four, and Wynn’s childhood discovery of “split body” models at Chicago’s Field Museum that inspired a lingering fascination with human anatomy. Each sculpture is given only a number (ie. Head 14) leaving the viewer to examine the compartments of objects and draw their own parallels and conclusions. You can see more recent work from the Heads series on their website. (via Colossal Submissions)