trees

Posts tagged
with trees



Photography

Infrared Photographs by Pierre-Louis Ferrer Capture French Landscapes in Bright Yellow Hues

August 31, 2018

Anna Marks

In French photographer Pierre-Louis Ferrer’s vibrant photographs, Dordogne, France is transformed into an enchanted land bathed in canary yellow. Ferrer’s colorful photographs illustrate the country’s idyllic topography, where the leaves upon the trees, fresh grass, and sculpted shrubbery are captured in the same vivid color.

While photographing, Ferrer takes time to observe his environment and decide on the best photographic technique to use. For his Dordogne photographs, Ferrer used an infrared photography technique which allowed him to capture the landscape in brilliant yellows. “My artistic approach is based on the invisible and imperceptible,” Ferrer tells Colossal. “I work with invisible parts of light (infrared and ultraviolet) and with techniques like long exposure to offer alternative views of our world.”

This yellow effect in Ferrer’s Dordogne photographs is due to a mix of visible and infrared light, and each plant species appears different depending on how it reacts to the light. “I use a selective filter that let’s pass a large part of infrared light and a small part of visible light,” Ferrer explains. “The main subjects of this technique are trees and foliage because they react a lot under infrared light.”

Although yellow is prevalent in nature; found in bananas, autumnal leaves, egg yolks, and the irises of some animal’s eyes, in Ferrer’s photographs he standardizes all natural elements, highlighting the color’s prevalence in natural forms.

As human eyes are not used to infrared light (due to its longer wavelengths), Ferrer’s photographs invite viewers to see Dordogne as through they are in a different dimension. The extravagant Jardins Suspendus at Marqueyssac and its ivy-covered châteaux are transformed into an ethereal world that might otherwise only appear in paintings.

Although fantastical, Ferrer’s photographs encourage mindfulness and allow us to reflect upon the importance of nature. “My goals are to invite contemplation, to realize the place of nature in urban places, to make aware of the impact of our environment on us, and our impact on the environment.”

To view more about his work visit his website and Instagram.

 

 



Art Photography

Abstracted Dual Landscapes Created Using Cleverly Placed Mirrors

August 23, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Sebastian Magnani carefully positions round mirrors in outdoor settings to capture two landscapes at once: the ground below and the sky above. In the ongoing series Reflections, some compositions reflect connected imagery, like blossom-covered grass and a flowering tree. Others juxtapose man-made surfaces like asphalt with organic branches. By removing the usual context of landscape images, Magnani allows the viewer to focus on the textural qualities of the environment, and some images even veer into illusions, as with the cloudy night sky that appears like a full moon.  You can see more from the Swiss photographer, including portraits, on Instagram and Facebook. Magnani has also recently started offering prints of the Reflections series on Society6. (via Bored Panda)

 

 

 



Art Design

Fabric Tree Stumps Formed From Pieces of Discarded Clothing by Tamara Kostianovsky

June 4, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All photos © Roni Mocan unless otherwise noted

Textile artist Tamara Kostianovsky creates realistic elements from nature out of strips of fabric and discarded clothing. In her latest series, the artist forms severed tree stumps from pieces of her late father’s clothing, integrating his belongings into a landscape of layered, multi-colored logs. The works address the passing of time and allude to the body returning to the environment after death.

The project is inspired by the South American people of the Andes who believe that Mother Earth is embodied by the surrounding mountains. Kostianovsky translates this idea to placing clothing items into sculptures that represent the earth and its environment. She explains in an artist statement: “Fusing the shapes of severed tree stumps of different forms and sizes to a palette indicative of the insides of the body, [the series Tree Stumps] pays homage to the cultural heritage of the people of Latin America, while presenting an alternative way of thinking about our post-industrial relationship to nature.”

Kostianovsky became entranced with the body while working at a surgeon’s office during her adolescence. She continues to make work that examines muscle and bone, often in other species such as livestock or whales. You can take a look inside the artist’s studio by visiting her Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

Photo courtesy of Wave Hill

 

 



Art

Impractical Wooden Furniture Created to Blend Into its Natural Environment

May 31, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"The Jones: Part 2" (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

“The Jones: Part 2” (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

Hugh Hayden builds furniture not intended for human use, crafting benches and chairs from pieces of wood without removing the original branches or twigs. In these sculptural works the stray forms make it nearly impossible to use the object as a piece of furniture. The shape an Adirondack chair is present, like in his piece The Jones and Other Borrowed Ideas, yet its impediments make sitting an uncomfortable challenge.

Hayden’s imbedded branches serve as a camouflage system that explores how his designed objects might blend into a natural landscape. His piece “Brier Patch,” which features six carved school desks, “juxtaposes the organic, unpredictability of the natural world (e.g. undergrowth,
a thicket etc.) with the ordered and disciplined pursuit of education and greater civilization,” he explains. “The branches extending from the desks are entangled and materialize this integration into the landscape or environment, creating a visible, unifying space, that is at once protective and impenetrable.”

His solo exhibition at White Columns runs through June 2, 2018, and is his first in New York City. Hayden recently received is MFA in Sculpture from Columbia University, and his Bachelor of Architecture from Cornell University in 2007. You can see more of his sculptures on his website and Instagram.

"The Jones: Part 2" (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

“The Jones: Part 2” (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

"Brier Patch" (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

“Brier Patch” (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of "Brier Patch" (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of “Brier Patch” (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of "Brier Patch" (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of “Brier Patch” (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

"Hangers" (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

“Hangers” (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of "Hangers" (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of “Hangers” (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of "Hangers" (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of “Hangers” (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

"The Jones and Other Borrowed Ideas" (2017), sculpted fallen hemlock, 40 x 48 x 53 inches

“The Jones and Other Borrowed Ideas” (2017), sculpted fallen hemlock, 40 x 48 x 53 inches

"Untitled Lexus Dash" (2017), sculpted wood from Harlem park, 60 x 48 x 42 inches

“Untitled Lexus Dash” (2017), sculpted wood from Harlem park, 60 x 48 x 42 inches

 

 



Design

The World’s Largest LEGO Cherry Blossom Tree Blooms in Japan

May 17, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

A record-breaking LEGO tree has taken shape at LEGOLAND Japan, a theme park in Nagoya dedicated to the beloved plastic bricks. The cherry tree’s construction marks the theme park’s first anniversary, and has been registered as the “largest LEGO brick cherry blossom tree” in the Guinness Book of World Records. It was made with 881,470 bricks which took over 6,500 hours to assemble. Superlatives aside, the hand-built tree is a spectacular sight to behold. The tree sculpture includes a grassy green base and illuminated lanterns, all made with LEGO bricks. You can watch a video of the tree’s creation below. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Art

A Tall Leafy Tree Grows in Tugboat Printshop’s New 4-Color Wood Block Print

April 4, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

In her newest artwork, Valerie Lueth has grown intricately intertwined roots and branches to form a 4-color woodblock print titled ‘BRANCHING.’ Lueth, who owns and operates Tugboat Printshop (previously) in Pittsburgh, hand-illustrated one key block and three additional color blocks to combine black, yellow, blue, and grey in the formation of the tree. To create the tree’s subtle shifts in tone and shape, Lueth first drew and carved the key block on 3/4 inch birch plywood. Next, she transferred the image via press onto the three color blocks, and hand-drew and carved each of the three color blocks. Finally, using very precise alignment, Lueth printed all four blocks sequentially on one sheet of paper to create the complete artwork.

The artist describes BRANCHING as “an image of generation and growth,” and it scales thirty inches tall and twelve inches wide. The print is currently available for pre-order on the Tugboat Printshop website. Lueth also shares her works in progress on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Trees Grow from Bricks and a Storefront on the Streets of New York by Pejac

April 3, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Elusive Spanish artist Pejac (previously) travels the world creating street interventions, often integrating natural elements into man-made structures through a combination of stenciling and trompe l’oeil painting. His most recent projects have brought him to New York City for the first time, where he has created two arboreal artworks in Bushwick and Chinatown.

Pejac formed Fossil, in Brooklyn’s Bushwick neighborhood, using a brick-sized stencil to spray paint carefully placed shadows on a brick wall. This illusion of bricks sinking back and surging forward  creates a pixelated tree. Chinatown’s Inner Strength is fully hand-painted, depicting a cherry blossom branch growing out of a security gate and surrounding by flying swallows. Pejac, who often addresses humanity’s fraught relationship to the natural world, describes his newest artworks to Colossal:

Taking a sturdy structure and familiar urban element as a base, Fossil is proposing a hypothetical fatal future in which the only memory of nature is the fossilized appearance of a tree on a brick wall. Opposing the first work, Inner Strength is an empowering piece portraying another hypothetical future in which nature breaks the barriers imposed by the hand of man, recovering the lost ground along the way.

In addition to his outdoor work, Pejac occasionally creates editioned prints using a variety of techniques ranging from lithography to screenprinting. You can follow the artist’s travels on Instagram and Facebook. For those in New York, Fossil is located at 27 Scott Avenue in Brooklyn, and Inner Strength can be found at 2 Henry Street in Manhattan.