trompe l’oeil

Posts tagged
with trompe l’oeil



Art

An Explosive New Mural and Paintings by Collin van der Sluijs

May 10, 2016

Christopher Jobson

collin-1

From the smallest details expressed on canvas to the cracked facade of a multi-story building, Dutch artist Collin van der Sluijs is comfortable investigating what he refers to as “personal pleasures and struggles in daily life.” Working without sketches or notes, the artist dives into each artwork with spray paint, acrylics, and ink as ideas take hold and images slowly emerge. He frequently examines themes of the natural world such as the cycle of life, the depictions of various species of birds, and the psychology of beings both human and animalistic.

Van der Sluijs was most recently in Chicago where he completed a tremendous mural in the south loop as part of the Wabash Arts Corridor that depicts two endangered Illinois birds amongst an explosion of blooms. He also opened his first solo show in the U.S. titled “Luctor Et Emergo” at Vertical Gallery, featuring a wide range of paintings and drawings. You can follow more of his work on Flickr.

collin-2

collin-3

collin-4

collin-7

collin-5

collin-6

 

 



Art Illustration

Quirky New Chalk Characters on the Streets of Ann Arbor by David Zinn

February 22, 2016

Christopher Jobson

zinn-1

Michigan illustrator David Zinn (previously) has brightened the streets of Ann Arbor with his off-the-wall (or technically on-the-wall) chalk drawings since 1987. The artist works with chalk or charcoal to create site-specific artworks that usually incorporate surrounding features like cracks, street infrastructure, or found objects. Over the years he’s developed a regular cast of recurring characters including a bright green monster named Sluggo and a “phlegmatic flying pig” named Philomena.

Many of Zinn’s artworks are available as archival prints, and he recently published a new book titled Temporary Preserves. You can follow his almost daily street chalk adventures on Instagram and Facebook.

zinn-2

zinn-3

zinn-4

zinn-5

zinn-6

zinn-7

zinn-8

 

 



Art

Hyperrealistic Oil Paintings of Haphazardly Wrapped Packages and Gifts by Yrjö Edelmann

December 23, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

yrijo-3

Image provided Craighead Green Gallery

The works of Yrjö Edelmann are so precise that they translate without question as photograph. Even with double, triple, and quadruple takes it is nearly impossible to imagine that the pieces have been produced from precisely placed oil paint. The objects Edelmann depicts are not perfectly wrapped pieces, but rather haphazardly taped and constructed, often on irregularly shaped canvases to heighten the trompe-l’œil effect. Scotch tape and twine hold the wrapping paper in place, with wrinkles covering the bright and often reflective package’s surface.

Edelmann was born in 1941 in Finland, and studied at the University College of Arts in Stockholm, Sweden. Edelmann is represented by Craighead Green Gallery in Dallas, Gallerie GKM in Malmö, and Scott Richards Contemporary Art in San Francisco where he has an upcoming solo exhibition in March of 2016. You explore more of his work in detail on Artsy.  (via This Isn’t Happiness)

Edelmann_05

Image provided Craighead Green Gallery

Edelmann_09

Image provided Craighead Green Gallery

Edelmann_03

Image provided Craighead Green Gallery

Edelmann_04

Image provided Craighead Green Gallery

Edelmann_08

Image provided Craighead Green Gallery

yrijo-2

Image provided Craighead Green Gallery

yrijo-1

Image provided Craighead Green Gallery

yrijo-4

Image courtesy of Scott Richards Contemporary Art

yrijo-5

Image courtesy of Scott Richards Contemporary Art

yrijo-6

 

 



Art

Trompe L'Oeil Ceramics That Imitate the Natural Appearance of Decaying Wood

August 18, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

inhand-4

Going Hand In Hand, 8.5″ x 26″ x 15.5″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic)

Ceramicist Christopher David White (previously) accurately captures the decay of wood through ceramics, portraying the distinct character of the natural material from the fine wood grain to the light ash coloration at the pieces’ edges. By utilizing a trompe l’oeil technique, White forces the viewer to take a closer look at his work while also investigating the truth hidden in the hyperrealistic sculptures.

Through his ceramic pieces White explores the reality of impermanence, often combining man and nature through treelike limbs and faces. “I seek to expose the beauty that often results from decay while, at the same time, making my viewer question their own perception of the world around them,” explains White. He hopes to highlight the fact that we are not separate from nature, but rather intrinsically connected to it.

White has a BFA in Ceramics from Indiana University and MFA in Craft and Material Studies from Virginia Commonwealth University. White’s work will be included in the exhibition Hyper-realism at the Daejeon Museum of Art in South Korea opening this fall. (via Artist a Day)

inhand-0

Going Hand In Hand, 8.5″ x 26″ x 15.5″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic)

inhand-3

Going Hand In Hand, 8.5″ x 26″ x 15.5″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic)

walk-0

A Walk That Is Measured And Slow, 14″ x 14″ 29″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic, drywall, iron oxide)

Theis Exhibition

A Walk That Is Measured And Slow, 14″ x 14″ 29″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic, drywall, iron oxide)

walk3

A Walk That Is Measured And Slow, 14″ x 14″ 29″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic, drywall, iron oxide)

1

Asphyxia, 2013, H: 11″ W: 9″ D: 11″, (Ceramic, acrylic)

13

Asphyxia, 2013, H: 11″ W: 9″ D: 11″, (Ceramic, acrylic)

2-up

Asphyxia, 2013, H: 11″ W: 9″ D: 11″, (Ceramic, acrylic)

 

 



Art

New Trompe L’oeil Sculptures of Flowing Dresses and Leaves Constructed from Plywood by Ron Isaacs

May 18, 2015

Christopher Jobson

isaacs-1

When looking at these wall-mounted sculptures depicting wrinkled dresses that sprout leaves or butterflies by artist Ron Isaacs (previously), you would be forgiven for thinking they were constructed from anything other than their actual materials: plywood and acrylic paint. Isaacs uses pieces of layered Finnish birch to construct every detail of these architectural clothes which he then covers in trompe l’oeil painting to create the illusion of depth. “I am still fascinated by the old simple idea of resemblance, the very first idea of art after tools and shelter: That an object made of one material can take on the outward appearance and therefore some of the ‘reality. of another,” says Isaacs. You can see his most recent collection of work as part of his second solo show at Tory Folliard Gallery in Milwaukee through May 23, 2015.

isaacs-2

isaacs-3

isaacs-4

isaacs-5

isaacs-6

isaacs-7

 

 



Art

Trompe-l'œil Window and Keyhole Illusions on the Streets of Istanbul by Pejac

October 20, 2014

Christopher Jobson

pejac-2

Photo by Julian Santiago

pejac-7

Photo by Julian Santiago

pejac-1

Photo by Julian Santiago

pejac-4

Photo by Julian Santiago

pejac-6

Photo by Julian Santiago

pejac-3

Photo by Julian Santiago

pejac-5

Photo by Julian Santiago

Spanish street artist Pejac (previously) just stopped by Istanbul where he painted three new trompe-l’œil pieces in the district of Uskudar titled Lock, Poster and Shutters. Painted with brushes, acrylic paint, pencils and sandpaper the works are located very close together are intended to represent the “perception and illusion of freedom.” He mentions the literal translation of Trompe l’oeil from French as “eye trap,” and says “in the case of these three windows, the trap works in both directions: from outside to inside and from inside to outside.”

You can follow Pejac’s most recent work on Instagram. (via Complex, StreetArtNews)