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Art

Vintage Family Photos Painted As Large Scale Murals by Mohamed L’Ghacham

April 21, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Separación De Poderes II, Ostend (Belgium) 2019

Morocco-born, Barcelona-based artist Mohamed L’Ghacham paints large figurative murals based on scenes from vintage family photos and everyday objects. Often choosing photographic “accidents” for their authenticity, the artist paints meals, table settings, toasts, and other communal rituals performed by normal people. When viewed at a wall-sized scale, the personal and seemingly unimportant moments gain new meaning and become more emotionally resonant for viewers despite never having met the families portrayed.

L’Ghacham’s use of muted color palettes connects the murals with their respective urban surroundings while also staying true to the vintage aesthetic of the source photography. Loose, layered brush strokes give the general shape of facial features and objects, but a step back from the image is necessary to appreciate the full snapshot. Head to the Mohamed L’Ghacham’s Vimeo page to see the artist in action, and follow his Instagram for more in-progress and completed mural photos.

Separación De Poderes II, Ostend (Belgium) 2019

Reunión de vecinos, Mataró (Spain) 2017

Le cadeau, Paris (France) 2017

¿Es papá y me lleva a casa? with Alba Trench, La Roca del Vallés (Spain) 2017

El Baile, Ragusa (Italy) 2018

Casa Paquita, Can Picafort (Spain), 2017

Aquí no et faltarà pa… with Ivan Floro, Granollers (Spain), 2018

Por Angelo!, Lioni (Italy), 2018

Cena para dos II with Alba Trench, Fuerteventura, Canary Islands (Spain) 2019

 

 



Art Craft

Forgotten Household Objects Cloaked in Needlepoint by Ulla Stina-Wikander

April 16, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Sweden-based artist Ulla Stina-Wikander (previously) continues her signature needlepoint interventions on domestic objects. Items traditionally associated with women’s housekeeping, like electric mixers and sewing machines along with hammers, wrenches, and axes, are cloaked in tightly fitting decorative designs. Stina-Wikander sources the needlepoint samples from flea markets and vintage stores, and is attracted to their connection with the now-anonymous people who made them. “These embroideries have been made by women and are often seen as kitsch and regarded as pretty worthless,” she states on her website. In using them in her interventions, the artist gives the abandoned textile works a new life. Explore more of Stina-Wikander’s work on Instagram.

 

 

 



Art

Patchwork Motifs and Knotted Thread by Francesca Colussi Cramer Add Texture to Vintage Photographs and Postcards

March 27, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Italian artist Francesca Colussi Cramer started embroidering patterns and grids onto found photographs four years ago when she discovered a small vintage shop down the street from her house in North Wales. She was enthralled with the nostalgic feel of the store’s old images and postcards, and began adding thread to provide a visual and physical contrast to the original work. Some of her additions are abstract, like images which appear like patchwork quilts, while for others she makes more representational choices by layering the real life hues of a location or person in small bursts of color.

“Adding thread on paper alters an existing surface and creates such a rich texture and contrast with the original image itself,” Cramer tells Colossal. “It’s both visual and tactile, and doing it on paper, instead of fabric, comes with challenges and differences that I find more intriguing every day. It is a sort of conversation with the past in the images, like lifting a layer of dust and letting the color through, adding another chapter.”

Cramer still sources her photographs and postcards from the original shop that sparked the project, while also scouring a monthly vintage fair near her home and searching online on Ebay or Etsy. Cramer sells her embroideries on her online shop. You can view the process behind her works by following her on Instagram. (via Lustik)

 

 

 



History

Edited Film Footage from 1890’s Paris Explores Some of the Everyday Thrills of Late 19th-Century Life

December 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Videographer Guy Jones (previously) slows down film from the late 1800s to early 1900s to more accurately match the speed at which modern footage is recorded and played. In addition to editing the pace of the century-old film, Jones also adds in sound effects to make the scenes more relatable. The editor creates foley to accompany the clomping of horses’ hooves, indistinctive background chatter of crowds, and the ringing of train bells.

In one of his Youtube videos from September, Jones edited together footage from Paris during the Belle Époque-era (1896-1900). The clips include visitors to the 1900 Paris Exposition standing on a moving walkway, a shot of the Eiffel Tower from a boat as it travels down the Seine River, and a short clip of boys playing with miniature sailboats in the Tuileries Garden. Passersby stare into the camera as they walk by in each scene, like a goateed man who walks across the screen near a minute and eight seconds into the clip, and then quickly returns for second appearance

The films were taken by the Lumière brothers, some of the first filmmakers in history. They are cited with making some of the first documentaries, albeit extremely short ones. You can see more of Jones’ video edits on Youtube. (via Kottke)

 

 

 



Art Photography

Giant Humans Overtake Landscapes in Guillaume Chiron’s Clever Collages

June 6, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Collage artist Guillame Chiron combines myths of the wild west and mid-century domestic life in humorous collages. Playing with scale and context, Chiron inserts oversized humans into urban landscapes, or shrinks down people to fit astride cats or on meteors in the galaxy. Chiron has also published a book of 250 collages. You can see more of the French artist’s collages on Tumblr and Instagram. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art Photography

Swirls of Electrifying Ink and Found Crystal Formations Transformed into Hair by Lorna Simpson

May 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Brooklyn-based artist Lorna Simpson combines images of black men and women pulled from vintage advertising photos with bright ink washes to give her subjects kaleidoscopic hairstyles erupting with color. The photographs are snipped from old issues of Ebony and Jet magazines and are either layered with ink or found textbook imagery like crystalized growths to explore the deep and varied language of hair. In one piece the subject is adorned with a thick slab of rock, while in another a cross-section of a human brain acts as the subject’s coiffed hairstyle.

Over 150 of these collages have been compiled in her recent book Lorna Simpson Collages, out early next month through Chronicle Books. The volume contains an artist’s statement and an introduction by poet, author, and scholar Elizabeth Alexander who explains, “Black women’s heads of hair are galaxies unto themselves, solar systems, moonscapes, volcanic interiors.”

You can currently preorder the book on Amazon, and view more collages by Simpson on her website.

 

 



History

Century-Old Film Footage Edited to Present a More Dynamic View of New York City Life in the Early 1900’s

May 1, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Videographer Guy Jones edits century-old film to more accurately match the video standards of the present day. For the black and white clip of New York City in 1911 shown above, Jones slowed down the film’s original speed and added ambient sound to match the activity seen on the city’s streets. The subtle additions allow for a more engaging experience when viewing of the 20th-century footage, and presents the urban milieu in a more realistic light.

This particular film print was created by the Swedish company Svenska Biografteatern during a trip to America, and remains in mint condition. You can see more of Jones’s edits of films from the late 19th-century to mid-1900s, like this video of Victorian street traffic galloping down the Champs-Élysées, on his Youtube channel. (via Twisted Sifter)