vintage

Posts tagged
with vintage



Art

Cleverly Collaged Portraits Layer Vintage Ads and Magazine Spreads into Dramatic Daydreams

November 18, 2021

Grace Ebert

“Did You Ever Really Love Me.” All images © Shane Wheatcroft, shared with permission

With a flair for spectacle and clandestine activities, the perfectly coiffed characters of Shane Wheatcroft’s collages face a deluge of intrigue and drama. The Kent-based artist snips vintage ads and editorial spreads that become the musings of professionally photographed subjects: a woman replays an excruciating party scene, a businessman envisions a wholesome family gathering, and quite a few protagonists imagine scenarios they likely keep covert.

Having worked with the medium for the last five years, Wheatcroft boasts a body of work that includes a broad array of collages, from bold typographic sayings to cheeky compositions that use ad slogans and outmoded headlines to poke fun at social conventions. Surreal and witty, the new portraits feature imagery from periodicals published between 1945 and 1975. They’re spurred by “being a big fan of John Stezaker and buying old movie annuals that had stunning publicity shots of film stars on plain backgrounds. The recent series I’m making is really my attempt to reflect everyday dramas and scenarios through the medium of collage,” he says.  “They’re kind of like a hybrid of Dalí’s portrait of Mae West and Coronation Street.”

The main portrait sets the tone for the piece, Wheatcroft tells Colossal, with the background image, furniture, and figures pasted on top. These additional elements compose an abstract representation of a face and generally feature a single eye peering through a television set or frame on the wall. “I’ll often have a song or personal experience in my head that’ll become the theme of the piece,” the artist says. “I can spend hours searching for an image of the right-sized chair or person that will fit. It’s a bit like making a jigsaw puzzle and hunting for the missing pieces.”

Represented by Lilford Gallery in Canterbury, Wheatcroft has been sharing a variety of flat collages and 3D diorama-style pieces—see these layered works up close on Instagram—and he also has a few pieces available for purchase on Artfinder. (via Kottke)

 

“Tough Room”

Left: “Parents Outgrown.” Right: “The Merry Widow”

“You Are My Sunshine”

“RGB”

Left: “Private Eye.” Right: “Notice Me”

“The Gables”

 

 



Art Craft

Found Vintage Photographs are Reinterpreted with Colorful Overlays by Julie Cockburn

October 3, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“The Ecologist” (2019), hand embroidery and inkjet on found photograph. All images © Julie Cockburn, courtesy of Flowers Gallery

Working with vintage photographs, artist Julie Cockburn (previously) re-energizes images that have been lost to time with colorful overlays. Cockburn adds tightly stitched orbs, swirling marbled enamel, and architectural structures as overlays to black-and-white or softly toned studio portraits, candid snaps, and landscape photos.

The London-based artist’s current solo exhibition, ‘Telling It Slant’, is on view through November 2, 2019 at Flowers Gallery‘s Kingsland Road location. Cockburn’s show title alludes to an Emily Dickinson poem called Tell all the Truth but Tell it Slant. In a statement, the gallery describes the artist’s work as “excavat[ing] authentic stories by circuitous means… Cockburn embarks on a visual journey to delicately reveal narrative histories and layered meanings in lost and discarded images. Cockburn partially obscures the images in a process she describes as ‘paradoxically unmasking’ their intrinsic truths.”

See more of the artist’s work on Instagram, and place an order for Cockburn’s first monograph, Stickybeak, published by Chose Commune.

“Moonscape” (2019), hand embroidery on found photograph

“Qualm” (2019), hand embroidery and inkjet on found photograph

“Plumage 1” (2019), hand embroidery on found postcard

“Blue Face Man” (2019), enamel on found photograph

L: “Armour” 2019, hand embroidery and ink on found photograph / R: “The Welder” (2019), hand embroidery on found photograph

“Feed the Birds Man” (2019), C type print of found photograph and glass beads

“Will O The Wisp” (2019), hand embroidery on found photograph

 

 



Art Craft

Radial Circles Embroidered Atop Vintage Photographs Act as Multi-Faceted Color Swatches

July 10, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Striped circles hover over vintage scenes of natural and built landscapes in embroidered interventions by Natalie Ciccoricco. Using colored threads that perfectly match the tones of the underlying images, Ciccoricco builds radial circles that act as multi-faceted color swatches. Each circle contains more than a dozen different hues of embroidery thread to pick up the nuanced colors present in the vintage images. In one photograph of a desert, the embroidered lines connect to light green cacti, blue sky, and a brown mountain. In another, the varied blue hues of water consume most of the image—and its corresponding circle—while thin black lines pick up the reflection of a boat’s hull.

Ciccoricco, who is Dutch and based in California, is represented by Zukowski Collective. When she is not crafting her embroidered images, she works as a freelance graphic designer and software language translation consultant. The artist shares her work on Instagram, and offers original artwork in her online store as well as some items on Society6.

 

 

 

 

 



Art

Vintage Family Photos Painted As Large Scale Murals by Mohamed L'Ghacham

April 21, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Separación De Poderes II, Ostend (Belgium) 2019

Morocco-born, Barcelona-based artist Mohamed L’Ghacham paints large figurative murals based on scenes from vintage family photos and everyday objects. Often choosing photographic “accidents” for their authenticity, the artist paints meals, table settings, toasts, and other communal rituals performed by normal people. When viewed at a wall-sized scale, the personal and seemingly unimportant moments gain new meaning and become more emotionally resonant for viewers despite never having met the families portrayed.

L’Ghacham’s use of muted color palettes connects the murals with their respective urban surroundings while also staying true to the vintage aesthetic of the source photography. Loose, layered brush strokes give the general shape of facial features and objects, but a step back from the image is necessary to appreciate the full snapshot. Head to the Mohamed L’Ghacham’s Vimeo page to see the artist in action, and follow his Instagram for more in-progress and completed mural photos.

Separación De Poderes II, Ostend (Belgium) 2019

Reunión de vecinos, Mataró (Spain) 2017

Le cadeau, Paris (France) 2017

¿Es papá y me lleva a casa? with Alba Trench, La Roca del Vallés (Spain) 2017

El Baile, Ragusa (Italy) 2018

Casa Paquita, Can Picafort (Spain), 2017

Aquí no et faltarà pa… with Ivan Floro, Granollers (Spain), 2018

Por Angelo!, Lioni (Italy), 2018

Cena para dos II with Alba Trench, Fuerteventura, Canary Islands (Spain) 2019

 

 



Art Craft

Forgotten Household Objects Cloaked in Needlepoint by Ulla Stina-Wikander

April 16, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Sweden-based artist Ulla Stina-Wikander (previously) continues her signature needlepoint interventions on domestic objects. Items traditionally associated with women’s housekeeping, like electric mixers and sewing machines along with hammers, wrenches, and axes, are cloaked in tightly fitting decorative designs. Stina-Wikander sources the needlepoint samples from flea markets and vintage stores, and is attracted to their connection with the now-anonymous people who made them. “These embroideries have been made by women and are often seen as kitsch and regarded as pretty worthless,” she states on her website. In using them in her interventions, the artist gives the abandoned textile works a new life. Explore more of Stina-Wikander’s work on Instagram.

 

 

 



Art

Patchwork Motifs and Knotted Thread by Francesca Colussi Cramer Add Texture to Vintage Photographs and Postcards

March 27, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Italian artist Francesca Colussi Cramer started embroidering patterns and grids onto found photographs four years ago when she discovered a small vintage shop down the street from her house in North Wales. She was enthralled with the nostalgic feel of the store’s old images and postcards, and began adding thread to provide a visual and physical contrast to the original work. Some of her additions are abstract, like images which appear like patchwork quilts, while for others she makes more representational choices by layering the real life hues of a location or person in small bursts of color.

“Adding thread on paper alters an existing surface and creates such a rich texture and contrast with the original image itself,” Cramer tells Colossal. “It’s both visual and tactile, and doing it on paper, instead of fabric, comes with challenges and differences that I find more intriguing every day. It is a sort of conversation with the past in the images, like lifting a layer of dust and letting the color through, adding another chapter.”

Cramer still sources her photographs and postcards from the original shop that sparked the project, while also scouring a monthly vintage fair near her home and searching online on Ebay or Etsy. Cramer sells her embroideries on her online shop. You can view the process behind her works by following her on Instagram. (via Lustik)