water

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Photography

In Tom Hegen’s Aerial Photos, Swimmers and Loungers Texture Two Florida Beaches with Colorful Patterns

December 20, 2022

Grace Ebert

An aerial photo of people lounging on a beach and in the ocean

All images © Tom Hegen, shared with permission

As much of the northern hemisphere braces for gray, wintery weather, photographer Tom Hegen (previously) highlights the warm, vibrant oceanside of Florida’s Siesta Key and Miami beaches. Swimmers and sunbathers escaping the rays under colorful umbrellas line the coast and appear as textured, geometric shapes dotting the water and white sandy expanses. The Beach Series juxtaposes the haphazard with the organized, documenting both neat rows of uniform loungers and clusters of people as they congregate along the shoreline.

See all of the sun-soaked photos in Hegen’s collection on Behance, and find prints, posters, and books of his aerial works on his site.

 

An aerial photo of people lounging on a beach under umbrellas

An aerial photo of people lounging on a beach and in the ocean

Two aerial photos of people lounging on a beach and in the ocean

An aerial photo of people lounging on a beach under umbrellas

An aerial photo of people lounging on a beach and in the ocean

An aerial photo of people lounging on a beach under umbrellas

An aerial photo of people lounging on a beach and in the ocean

 

 

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Art

The Denizens of ‘Submersia’ Breathe New Life into Ancient Artifacts in Oil Portraits by Kajahl

November 18, 2022

Kate Mothes

An oil painting by Kajahl.

“Amphibian Resurfaced” (2022), oil on canvas, 60 x 48 inches. All images © Kajahl, shared with permission courtesy of moniquemeloche

From his studio overlooking Monterey Bay, California, Kajahl has created a new series of paintings that draw inspiration from the sea and ancient heritage, continuing a practice that employs portraiture to subvert white, European historical narratives. The artist merges classical motifs and mythical realms in Submersia, a fictional underwater world where artifacts take on new life.

Greek and Roman vessels like glass balsamarii, wine jugs known as oinochoes, and conical rhyton vases often depicted figures or were fashioned in the shape of human or animal heads. Kajahl reimagines artifacts like these as mystical seaborne figures, redefining the historical portrayal of “aethiops,” an archaic term for dark-skinned people. On household containers, these often showed “individuals possessing phenotypes typically associated with Sub-Saharan Africa,” he explains in a statement. “Harkening back over two millennia, I interrogate these fascinating and controversial subjects, probing our relationship to these objects that confront us from an alien world.”

Kajahl’s “Iceberg Entities” are human-iceberg fusions that are starting to thaw, isolated in deep water. The figures gaze intentionally at the viewer, who is given a simultaneous view from above and below the surface that separates “the visible from the invisible world, emphasizing water’s ability to obscure, conceal, or reveal what was once beneath,” he says. On the sea floor, the “Oceandwellers” and “Coral Kids” inhabit a realm brimming with colorful rocks, coral, and shellfish. Air bubbles escape from their mouths, and their gaze also meets the viewer, represented not as inanimate artifacts but as living, breathing figures who are capable of emotion and perception.

Submersia is on view at moniquemeloche in Chicago through January 7, 2023, and you can follow more of Kajahl’s work on Instagram.

 

An oil painting by Kajahl.

“Rocky Reef Inhabitant” (2022), oil on canvas, 60 x 48 inches

Two oil paintings by Kajahl.

Left: “Iceberg Entity I (Pointed Peak Crown)” (2022), oil on canvas, 72 x 48 inches. Right: “Iceberg Entity III (Ultramarine Gold Turban)” (2022), oil on canvas, 72 x 48 inches

An oil painting by Kajahl.

“Iceberg Entity (Glacial Fracture Head)” (2022), oil on canvas, 72 x 48 inches

An oil painting by Kajahl.

“Underwater Exhale” (2022), oil on canvas, 60 x 48 inches

An oil painting by Kajahl.

“Kelp Forrest Ocean Dweller” (2022), oil on canvas, 60 x 48 inches

An oil painting by Kajahl.

“Iceberg Entity IV (Cracked Head Thawing)” (2022), oil on canvas, 72 x 48 inches

 

 



Photography

Tiers of Dyed Water Burst into Perfectly Concentric Circles in Jack Long’s Energetic Photos

November 12, 2022

Grace Ebert

A photo of colorful tiers of splashing water

All images © Jack Long, shared with permission

For at least a decade, Jack Long has paired his day job in advertising photography with a growing archive of personal projects that explore the energetic, dynamic qualities of liquid. His latest series centers on circular pools of water that splash outward, creating colorfully tiered layers that build up the dimension of a typically gravity-bound material. Although the liquid appears to be spraying outward after being punctured by an object dropped from above, it is actually gurgling upward from a custom-designed fountain. Long shares with Colossal that the machine took about two years to build and produces pools that reach about 30 inches in diameter, which he has to photograph within a fraction of a second to capture the perfectly concentric effect.

You can find more of Long’s hypnotic works on Behance, Instagram, and his site.

 

A photo of colorful tiers of splashing water

A photo of colorful tiers of splashing water

A photo of colorful tiers of splashing water

A photo of colorful tiers of splashing water

A photo of colorful tiers of splashing water

A photo of colorful tiers of splashing water

A photo of colorful tiers of splashing water

 

 



Art

Diverse Ecosystems Merge in Hyperrealistic Paintings of Flora and Fauna by Lisa Ericson

November 4, 2022

Kate Mothes

An acrylic painting by Lisa Ericson of a deer standing on a reef of coral.

“High Tide” (2022), acrylic on panel. All images © Lisa Ericson, shared with permission

Ecosystems intermingle and mammals find themselves immersed in an increasingly watery world in Lisa Ericson’s hyperrealistic acrylic paintings. A hare and a mountain goat, which would typically be found in dry climates or high elevations, stand atop a small island of cacti or rock in an ongoing series of works that view the climate crisis—especially the impending rise of sea levels—through a lens of magical realism.

Drawing on the artistic legacy of chiaroscuro, or contrast between the bright figures and deep background, Ericson’s compositions appear as if a spotlight has been directed on the scene to highlight unusual interactions, such as a fox ferrying bluebirds across a waterway or a mountain goat stranded on a submerged rocky peak. Furthering the notion that environmental change cannot be ignored, the titles speak to witnessing immense change, experiencing a sense of foreboding, and heeding warnings.

You can see some of Ericson’s recent works on view at Antler Gallery in Portland, Oregon, through November 20, and find more on her website and Instagram.

 

An acrylic painting by Lisa Ericson of a fox wading through water with numerous bluebirds on its back.

“Risky Business” (2022), acrylic on panel

An acrylic painting by Lisa Ericson of a hare and a bird on top of a cactus, which surfaces from the water.

“Late Warning” (2022), acrylic on panel

An acrylic painting by Lisa Ericson of a mountain goat standing half-submerged in water on top of a rock with fish at its feet.

“Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” (2022), acrylic on panel

An acrylic painting by Lisa Ericson featuring a fish with fins that look like coral and two other fish.

“Shelter in Place” (2022), acrylic on panel

An acrylic painting by Lisa Ericson of a fox with moss and fungi growing on its back.

“Wake Me When It’s Over” (2020), acrylic on panel

An acrylic painting by Lisa Ericson of a red squirrel on top of a turtle's back.

“Treading Water” (2022), acrylic on panel

 

 



Photography

Forceful Waves Rip Across Lake Erie in Tempestuous Photos by Trevor Pottelberg

October 19, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Trevor Pottelberg, shared with permission

When fall and winter storms send turbulent waves across Lake Erie, Canadian photographer Trevor Pottelberg documents the volatile eruptions that burst from the water’s surface. Facing winds up to 60 miles per hour, he frames massive waves as they emerge in dramatic outbursts, leaving sprays of icy mist and ripples in their wake. The monumental swells are energetic and immensely strong, showcasing the formidable power of nature.

Based in Brownsville, Ontario, Pottelberg teaches photography at Fanshawe College and will have a variety of landscape and animal images on view at Elm Hurst Inn & Spa in Ingersoll starting in December. Shop prints on his site, and find more of his works on Instagram and Facebook, some of which were recently recognized in the Professional Photographers of Canada Ontario Provincial Competition.

 

 

 



Photography

Explosive Photos by Ray Collins Capture the Ocean’s Mercurial Nature As It Erupts in Extravagant Bursts

September 29, 2022

Grace Ebert

“VII.” All images © Ray Collins, shared with permission

Ever fickle, the ocean and all its excitable energy provide endless fodder for Ray Collins (previously). The Australian photographer, who is based in Wollongong, is known for his dramatic images that capture the diversity of textures and forms that emerge from the water. Waves undulate into scaly walls, fine mists erupt in the air, and surges turn in on themselves, creating eerie, patterned tunnels. Each image emphasizes the capricious nature of the water, which Collins shares as the impetus for his practice. “I’m fortunate that my subject, the ocean, is never the same. There are always new emotions and feelings to capture. As long as I show up with a blank slate I will find new and beautiful moments,” he says.

Collins has several books and prints available on his site, and you can find a massive archive of his photos on Instagram.

 

“Tree of Life”

“Siren”

“Scales”

Left: “Aberrant.” Right: “Convergence”

“Matter”

Left: “Fortitude.” Right: “Cauldron”

“Rumble”

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Sailing Ship Kite