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Photography

Captivating Photographs of Storm Clouds by Camille Seaman Show Nature’s Power

November 7, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Camille Seaman travels the world capturing fleeting moments of power in diverse landscapes. From melting icebergs at both poles to stormy states across America, Seaman showcases the beauty, terror, and fragility of nature in her digital and film images. Seaman began storm-chasing after her daughter, eight years old at the time, suggested it might be of interest while the two were watching the Storm Chasers TV show. Her newest book,The Big Cloud, focuses on supercell storms around the U.S. It includes a forward by New Yorker science writer Alan Burdick, and includes behind-the-scenes shots and written reflections from Seaman about the experience of being a storm chaser.

“Sometimes as we pulled into a local fuel station, we would be met with superstitious folks who were not glad to see us; some of those people had lost their homes or loved ones in storms,” Seaman writes in the preface. “It was important to remember that these people lived here year after year, never knowing if this would be the day when a tornado might come through their town. It taught me great empathy and compassion. It was important that our chasing storms not become some sort of disaster tourism… I always wanted my images to speak to the duality of all things—to speak to the essential truth that there can be beauty in something terrible and vice versa, that there is no creation without destruction.”

In addition to authoring three books, Seaman is also a TED Senior Fellow, and has published works in National Geographic, The New York Times, and Outside Magazine. You can find The Big Cloud, published by Princeton Architectural Press, on Amazon. Follow the photographer’s travels on Instagram and Twitter.

 

 



Photography

Towering Plumes of Volcanic Smoke Mix With Streaks of Lightning in Photographs by Francisco Negroni

July 16, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

All photographs © Francisco Negroni, shared with the artist’s permission

Chilean freelance photographer Francisco Negroni captures nature at its most rambunctious, with a particular focus on volcanic eruptions and lightning storms. In his work, bright orange and red streaks of lava burst from mountains, enormous plumes of smoke overtake the horizon, and dramatic lightning strikes connect the earth and sky. The photographer originally studied advertising photography and tourism, but once he witnessed his first volcano, he knew that it would be his focus going forward.

Colossal spoke with Negroni about his strategies for braving the elements and capturing just the right moments:

When I go outside to take photographs, I try to leave with the images in my mind: I imagine what I am going or want to achieve that day in that place… Although many times I don’t get what I imagined or thought would be a good photograph, and I get others that I couldn’t have imagined and they are much better, it’s strange. But almost always I work in a direct documentation, with an idea in base, but trying to always obtain an understanding of something more difficult for the spectator.

Due to the expenses and difficulties of traveling in the Chilean backcountry, Negroni carefully tracks  upcoming eruptions and risk factors to maximize the potential of each trip. He travels light, only with a backpack containing a laptop, camera, tripod, and three lenses, and he camps in his car for longer excursions.  Presently, Negroni shoots for reporters and journalists, and has published his work with National Geographic, the Associated Press, and Terra. You can see more of his weather and landscape photographs, which are also available as prints, on his website. For the adventurous, Negroni also leads personalized tours and workshops.

 

 



Amazing Photography

Unique Weathering Pattern Creates Fascinating Geometric Ripples on a Chain Link Fence

June 13, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All images published with the photographer’s permission

Over the past few years, Twitter user @Ben_On_The_Moon has photographed his chain link fence due to a mysterious weathering pattern that has caused groups of concentric rings to appear on the upper side of the fence’s segments. His macro photographs emphasize the intriguing apparitions, which appear like miniature crop circles on the metal bars. Despite his research, he has not discovered the specific cause of the pattern. You can see more of @Ben_On_The_Moon’s documentation of the curious phenomena on Twitter. (via Kottke)

 

 



Photography

An Illuminated Niagara Falls Captured in a January Freeze by Adam Klekotka

February 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All images © Adam Klekotka, Licensed for use on Colossal

All images © Adam Klekotka, Licensed for use on Colossal

Toronto-based photographer Adam Klekotka had visited Niagara Falls several times during his time in Canada, but never journeyed to the massive waterfall during winter. After two weeks of record-setting temperatures this January (which led the Canadian news to report that parts of the country were colder than the surface of Mars) Klekotka decided to explore the icy waterfall at night, discovering an illuminated scene that appeared more like a deserted alien landscape than natural wonder.

“The temperature was about -20C, but due to cold wind and high humidity, it felt like it was way below -30C,” Klekotka told Colossal. “After some time of shooting, my hands were really frostbitten. Because of the small buttons in the cameras, I had to handle them without gloves. Additionally the drops of water were freezing on the front glass of the lens and I had to clean it every couple of seconds.”

Klekotka captured the glowing waterfall from several angles, including an observation deck encrusted with a thick layer of icicles. You can see more of Klekotka’s otherworldly images on his Instagram and browse a selection of his small prints on his online shop. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Photography Science

Breathe: A Stunning Black & White Timelapse of Thunderstorms Across the Central Plains

January 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Phoenix-based filmmaker, photographer, and storm chaser Mike Olbinski captures approaching storms around his desert home using high definition video, often posting his works to his Vimeo in 4K. Breathe, one of his latest short films, is the first ever work posted in 8K and features a selection of storms shot in 2017 in either the American central plains or southwest. Watch the video above in high resolution to witness the magnificence of each rolling stormcell gather and disperse throughout a variety of open landscapes.

You can follow along with Olbinski’s storm chasing adventures on his blog, and see more of his timelapse videos and photography on his website.

 

 



Photography

San Francisco Shrouded in Dense Fog Captured by Michael Shainblum

December 19, 2017

Christopher Jobson

In a relentless pursuit to capture the frequently shifting weather patterns of the San Francisco Bay Area, photographer Michael Shainblum (previously) has stalked scenic outlooks around the city for close to a decade. The city is especially famous for dense fog and low-lying stratus clouds that roll in almost daily during the summer, resulting in the surreal scenes he loves to photograph and film. Shainblum shares in a statement about the ongoing body of work:

The Fog in the bay area feels like it has a mind of its own. The fog can often times disturb a beautiful sunny day and cover the sky with darkness. There are mixed feelings about the fog, many residents finding it a huge inconvenience and depressing. Where as many residences embrace the fog and its erratic behavior. Regardless of how the fog is perceived from below. It’s hard to ignore just how incredible it looks from above. This series is a tribute to the incredible fog and a showcase of its magnificent beauty. Fog has essentially become a living breathing entity in San Francisco.

You can see more of his Symphony of Fog series on his website and by following him on Instagram. He also occasionally teaches timelapse workshops and sells prints of his best shots.

 

 



Amazing Photography Science

Transient: An Extraordinary Short Film That Captures Lightning at 1,000 Frames per Second

December 5, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Filmmaker and photographer Dustin Farrell spent over a month this summer traveling some 20,000 miles for the sole purpose of filming thunderstorms around the United States. Using a pricey Phantom Flex4K high-speed camera he filmed lightning strike after lightning strike at 1,000 frames per second, resulting in the impressive footage that shows the remarkable complexity of electricity in the atmosphere. Most of the footage in the final cut was shot around Farrell’s home state of Arizona.

“Lightning is like a snowflake. Every bolt is different,” shares Farrell. “I learned that lightning varies greatly in speed. There are some incredible looking bolts that I captured that didn’t make the cut because even at 1000fps they only lasted for one frame during playback. I also captured some lightning that appear computer generated it lasted so long on the screen.”

You can catch a few more of his short films here. (via PetaPixel)

 

 

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