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Art

Meteorological Data Visualized as Mixed Media Sculptures by Nathalie Miebach

May 26, 2019

Andrew LaSane

“Sibling Rivalry”

Boston-based conceptual artist Nathalie Miebach (previously) weaves colorful, complex sculptures using rope, wood, paper, fibers, and data from weather events. Two of the artist’s recent series explore the impact of storm waters on our lives and on marine ecosystems, with variables like wind and temperature (and the harmony of the composition) often informing the rainbow of colors used to translate the data into a three-dimensional structure.

The “Changing Waters” series uses data from The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System (GoMOOS) buoys as well as from coastal weather stations to show relationships between weather patterns and changes in marine life. Similarly, the artist uses meteorological data from recent storms including Hurricane Sandy, Hurricane Maria, and Hurricane Katrina to inform her “Floods” series, which looks at the events both from scientific and human experience narratives. Cut and woven elements are connected to form geometric shapes and patterns that are as layered and in flux as our understanding of the storms themselves.

“Retiring Bob”

Miebach tells Colossal that her exploration of the intersection of science and art began while taking continuing education astronomy courses at Harvard University and basket weaving courses at a nearby school. As a tactile learner, she found it easier to understand the abstract concepts and ideas of the former by using the latter. “I was lucky to have a very open-minded professor who accepted it without any questions. I’m not sure if it hadn’t been for his openness to this somewhat unconventional way of learning astronomy, if I would have continued.”

See Miebach’s work in two solo shows opening this fall, at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft in Texas and the Cedarhurst Center for the Arts in Mt. Vernon, Illinois. Her work will also be exhibited as a part of group shows at Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts at Florida Institute of Technology, at New Media Gallery in Vancouver, and at Fuller Craft Museum in Brockton, Massachusetts. Follow the artist on Instagram to see more of her sculptural work and for more details on upcoming exhibitions.

“Build Me a Platform, High in the Trees, so I May See the Waters”

“She’s Coming On Strong”

“The Burden of Every Drop”

“The Burden of Every Drop” (detail)

“Changing Waters”

“Changing Waters” (detail)

“Changing Waters” (detail)

 

 

 



Design

‘The Weaving Project’ Invites Visitors to Climb Inside a Massive Installation Formed From Nearly 10,000 Feet of Rope

February 20, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

For this year’s London Fashion Week, British fashion designer Anya Hindmarch collaborated with design collective Numen/For Use (previously) to create an installation that would excavate the playgrounds and play sets of visitors’ distant memories. The Tube, a bright blue structure created from nearly 10,000 feet of rope, was a part of a temporary pop-up in a Soho warehouse called The Weave Project which also included a cafe and store. The structure invited guests to revisit their childhood by climbing within the gigantic meandering structure. This is not the first time Hindmarch has used London Fashion Week as an excuse to create an installation dedicated to play— last fall the designer recalled another child-like object by producing a massive beanbag that filled the main room of London’s Banqueting House. If you like this work, check out Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam as well. (via Dezeen)

 

 



Art

Dried Grass and Branches are Woven and Stitched into Delicate Sculptural Drawings by Kazuhito Takadoi

January 18, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Kazuhito Takadoi uses natural materials combined with traditional Japanese art supplies like sumi ink and washi paper to make delicate sculptural works that tread between two and three dimensions. Takadoi cultivates and then gathers grass, leaves, and twigs from his garden to form the meticulous structures that comprise his dimensional drawings. Though these organic findings are secured in place through weaving and stitching, they continue to evolve as they dry and mature, changing in flexibility and color.

The artist, who is originally from Nagoya, Japan, trained in agriculture and horticulture in Japan, the US, and the UK before studying art and garden design in the UK. Takadoi is now based in Britain and is represented by jaggedart gallery in London. His work will be on view at Saatchi Gallery as part of Collect, an international modern craft and design fair, on view in London from February 23 until March 3, 2019.

 

 



Craft Design

Floral Wreaths Blossom Into Bold Type

October 22, 2018

Anna Marks

In designer Olga Prinku’s floral wreaths, hundreds of dried plants and flowers are sewn into the shape of large capital letters. Flower heads spring out of the tulle as if magically sprouting from planted seeds Prinku had scattered weeks before. Although a graphic designer by trade, her project has sparked a love affair with weaving and craft, and encouraged her to experiment with several different mediums. 

“This particular technique of weaving flowers on tulle actually came to me in a dream,” Prinku tells Colossal. At first she began placing dried flowers on a sieve, which resembled the net structure of tulle. Once she began using the new medium, she looked to her garden for fresh flowers. She initially used fresh flowers for her works, but the natural objects began to shrink as they dried, which left gaps in her designs. 

“Now I use dry flowers,” she explains. “Some I buy readily dried, and some I pick from fresh and dry myself using silica gel. I also collect seed pods at the end of the season, which I use as they are.”  Prinku alters what flowers and plants she uses depending on the season. “I’m still learning a lot through experimenting about what flowers are the best – I’m basically looking for ones that are good at holding their color when dry and that have thin stems that I can use on the tulle.”

Prinku’s artistic process has fostered her appreciation of beauty and intricate details that exist in nature. “I’ve become much more observant about the plants that are growing all around where I live, and that fuels my creativity too,” she says. To learn more about Prinku’s work visit her website and her Instagram.

 

 



Art Craft

Massive Circular Weavings by Tammy Kanat Combine Intuitive Pattern-Making and Natural Fibers

July 10, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

“Young Heart” (2018), wool, linen, silk, mohair, fibers and copper frame, 120 x 80 cm. All photographs by Emily Weaving, courtesy of the artist

Australian fiber artist Tammy Kanat uses unique combinations of richly textured fabrics and materials to form large-scale abstract wall weavings. The former jewelry designer began weaving in 2011, when she trained at the Australian Tapestry Workshop. Using an organically shaped ovoid metal frame, Kanat works in colorful natural materials like wool, mohair, silk, hemp, and jute to create her sculptural pieces. You can see more of creations on the artist’s Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

“Blue Topaz” (2017), wool, linen, silk, fibers, and copper frame, 100cm diameter

“Circle of Color” (2017), wool, linen, silk, fibers, and copper frame, 100cm diameter

“Brave Heart” (2018), wool, linen, silk, fibers, and copper frame, 150 x 210 cm

“Destiny” (2017), tapestry wool and copper frame, 100cm diameter

“Pattern Play” (2018), wool, linen, silk fibers, and copper frame, 100cm diameter

“Wilderness” (2018), wool, linen, silk, fibers, and copper frame, 150cm diameter

 

 



Art

New Plant-Based Embroidery and Interconnected Baskets by Ana Teresa Barboza

January 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Peruvian artist Ana Teresa Barboza has previously been drawn to recreating full landscapes with yarn and thread, embroidering large tapestries with rivers, valleys, and waves that spill out from the wall and rest on the floor. Barboza continues her exploration of installation-based tapestry with a new body of work that charts the growth of individual plants, while also expanding her practice into weaving with a new work of interconnected baskets.

Her series Increase charts a plant’s shadow for 15 days, steadily tracing its growth and movement over the two week time space. Balls of yarn lay at the foot of each tapestry, providing a visualization of the diminishing material as it is slowly added to the changing portrait. The colorful embroidery provides a charged glow around the white space of the original plant, its increasing mass illustrated in a collage of jagged shapes and vibrant hues.

Barboza’s new work United Baskets, retreats from color altogether, instead focusing on process and shape. The piece is a collection of seven interconnected baskets, which took the artist 30 days to weave from bundles of Huacho reed. The series of vessels vary in size and position, yet are each seamlessly linked throughout the full 10 by 10 foot composition.

Although Barboza now works with textiles, she previously studied painting at Lima’s Pontifical Catholic University. You can see more of her embroidered and woven installations on her website here.

 

 



Craft Design

An Oversized Woven Chair by Veega Tankun

December 19, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Although London-based designer Veega Tankun has only just graduated from the University of Brighton, she clearly possesses a strong sense of aesthetic and understanding of materials as evidenced in these comfy looking chairs woven from overstuffed knit tubes. Tankun says that she’s fascinated with rejuvenating old techniques in her design practice, bringing modern materials and color palettes to traditional production methods. “Traditional doesn’t always have to mean old and outdated, the trick is to make something that we know new and exciting again,” she shares.

This chunky chair is just one Tankun’s latest creations, you can explore more of her work on Design Milk and Instagram. Some of her pieces will also be on view at London’s Top Drawer starting next month.

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