Creatures from Your Dreams and Nightmares: Unbelievable Marine Worms Photographed by Alexander Semenov

Creatures from Your Dreams and Nightmares: Unbelievable Marine Worms Photographed by Alexander Semenov worms ocean nature

Creatures from Your Dreams and Nightmares: Unbelievable Marine Worms Photographed by Alexander Semenov worms ocean nature

Creatures from Your Dreams and Nightmares: Unbelievable Marine Worms Photographed by Alexander Semenov worms ocean nature

Creatures from Your Dreams and Nightmares: Unbelievable Marine Worms Photographed by Alexander Semenov worms ocean nature

Creatures from Your Dreams and Nightmares: Unbelievable Marine Worms Photographed by Alexander Semenov worms ocean nature

Creatures from Your Dreams and Nightmares: Unbelievable Marine Worms Photographed by Alexander Semenov worms ocean nature

Creatures from Your Dreams and Nightmares: Unbelievable Marine Worms Photographed by Alexander Semenov worms ocean nature

Creatures from Your Dreams and Nightmares: Unbelievable Marine Worms Photographed by Alexander Semenov worms ocean nature

Creatures from Your Dreams and Nightmares: Unbelievable Marine Worms Photographed by Alexander Semenov worms ocean nature

Creatures from Your Dreams and Nightmares: Unbelievable Marine Worms Photographed by Alexander Semenov worms ocean nature

Creatures from Your Dreams and Nightmares: Unbelievable Marine Worms Photographed by Alexander Semenov worms ocean nature

Our favorite photographer of everything creepy and crawly under the sea, Alexander Semenov, recently released a number of incredible new photographs of worms, several of which may be completely unknown to science. Half of the photos were taken at the Lizard Island Research Station near the Great Barrier Reef in Australia during a 2-week conference on marine worms called polychaetes. Semenov photographed 222 different worm species which are now in the process of being studied and documented by scientists.

The other half of the photos were taken during Semenov’s normal course of work at the White Sea Biological Station in northern Russia where he’s head of the scientific divers team. We’ve previously featured the intrepid photographer’s work with jellyfish (part 2, part 3), and starfish.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .