Photography

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Photography

In-Camera Light Paintings by Hannu Huhtamo Sprout in the Darkness Like Alien Blooms

January 13, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Utilizing a variety of light tools, Finland-based artist Hannu Huhtamo works in the dark to create these delightfully unusual light paintings. Appearing like alien flowers blooming in forests and abandoned buildings, each piece is created in-camera without the aid of Photoshop. Great Big Story recently met with Huhtamo to go behind-the-scenes and learn more about how he conceives and executes each photo in the video above.

 

 



Art Photography

Photomontages That Trace Light Through Overgrown Countrysides and Abandoned Interiors

January 12, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

"Thicket" (2015)

“Thicket” (2015), all images © Suzanne Moxhay

Artist Suzanne Moxhay produces photomontage scenes which seem to effortlessly combine elements from both her own photography practice and her large archive of collected images. To compose her taken and collected photographs, Moxhay relies on a film technique dating back to the early 20th century called matte painting, a process where backdrops are illustrated on glass panels and integrated into live-action sets. Using this method she creates the illusion that all of her disparate pictures are one cohesive image, first arranging the fragments on glass, then re-photographing the new configuration, and finally touching up the compositions digitally.

“In my recent work I have been exploring concepts of spatial containment in montages built from fragments of photographed and painted interiors,” says Moxhay. “Architectures are disrupted by anomalous elements – contradictory light sources, faulty perspective, paradoxes of scale. Light casts shadows in the wrong direction, walls fail to meet in corners, an area of the image can be seen either as an enclosing wall or dark overcast sky.”

Moxhay lives and works in London. You can see more of her photomontage scenes on her website. (via ArtistADay)

Eventide (2012)

“Eventide” (2012)

"Arch" (2016)

“Arch” (2016)

"Antechamber" (2014)

“Antechamber” (2014)

"Feralis" (2011)

“Feralis” (2011)

 

 



Photography

Dazzling Images of Glowing Flowers Photographed With Ultraviolet-Induced Visible Fluorescence

January 11, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

28-year-old photographer Craig Burrows photographs plants and flowers using a type a photography called UVIVF or “ultraviolet-induced visible fluorescence.” If you haven’t heard of it, that’s not a surprise, as it is a relatively unknown process which brings out the glowing fluoresce in plant matter through the use of high-intensity UV lights.

Typically UV is removed through a camera’s lens, however Burrows photographs with a 365nm LED light which is passed through a filter to transmit only UV and infrared light. The dazzling plant life Burrows’ photographs absorbs this UV light and releases visible light at different wavelengths, which allows him to capture colors far more vivid than those seen in a typical viewing condition.

Although Burrows has limited his photography to singular flowers and small arrangements, his next step is aimed at illuminating entire scenes, like gardens, glades, and greenhouses, with 100-watt floodlights. You can see more of the Southern California-based photographer’s glowing plant portraits on his Flickr and portfolio site. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Photography Science

A Giant Naturally Occurring Ice Circle Appears Briefly in a Washington River

January 10, 2017

Christopher Jobson

All photographs © Kaylyn Messer.

This weekend, word spread via Facebook that a large circle of ice was spinning in small river just outside of Seattle. After seeing a quick video of it in her feed, photographer Kaylyn Messer jumped in her car and was fortunate to witness the incredible sight of this gargantuan ice disc as it spun in the current of the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River.

“The ice circle was pretty captivating,” Messer shared with Colossal. “You can hear the sound of the river flowing continuously. Sounds from the ice periodically interjected with very small sharp cracks and groans. Overall, it was a quiet experience to stand along the river watching the ice circle rotate.”

Ice circles are a fairly rare phenomenon that occur mostly in North America and Scandinavia in slow moving rivers during the winter. The discs are formed when a large piece of ice breaks off in the river creating an effect called ‘rotational shear’ where the current slowly grinds away at the free-floating chunk until its smoothed into a perfect circle.

Messer shares more photos and videos of the ice disc on her blog.

 

 



Photography

Sky-High Images of Los Angeles at Dusk and Dawn by Dylan Schwartz

January 9, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Creative Director and photographer Dylan Schwartz‘s point-of-view is high above the cities he photographs, capturing the bridges, sports complexes, and tips of high rises from the cockpit of a helicopter. Most of Schwartz’s images feature his hometown of LA as the subject, showcasing views from Hollywood to Chinatown during the hazy moments right before dusk and dawn.

Schwartz’s sky-high images of LA will be exhibited next week at PHOTOLA with artbarltd from January 12 through 15. You can see more of his work on his Instagram and website.

 

 



Art Photography

Tiny Colorful Objects Meticulously Organized by Adam Hillman

January 6, 2017

Christopher Jobson

If you need a dose of color (and sugar) injected into your Instagram feed, the account belonging to Adam Hillman is probably your best bet. The New Jersey-based visual artist sifts through multitudes of colorful everyday objects and foods which he organizes into zen-like patterns, towers, and gradients. Seen here are some of our favorites from the last few months, and he posts frequently on Instagram and Tumblr. (via Things Organized Neatly)

 

 



Photography

Close-Up Portraits of Birds Shot in a Photographer’s Backyard

December 29, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

After noticing the birds in Michigan were far different than those in her native Germany, Lisa M. Ca., an amateur photographer, began photographing them with her DSLR. In an attempt to find more creative ways to capture the variety of species that flew through her backyard, Lisa purchased the Bird Photo Booth 2.0. The device uses a motion detector to snap its shutter, capturing birds with a macro lens at ten images per second. After selecting her favorite images of the mourning doves, blue jays, and cardinals that feed from the Photo Booth’s attached seed bowl, Lisa touches up the images in Photoshop. You can follow more of her backyard photography on her Tumblr. (via Bored Panda)