My New Old Chair: Artist “Fixes” Broken Wood Furniture with Opposing Materials 

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As part of her ongoing series titled My Old New Chair, visual artist Tatiane Freitas repairs broken wood furniture by replacing the missing pieces with translucent acrylic. Much like the Japanese practice of kintsugi or medieval parchment repair, her designs restore functionality to the chairs while acknowledging the history of each piece. One chair from the series was recently included in the Clairvoyance exhibition at Guy Hepner in New York, and you can see more of her latest work on her website and Instagram. (via Dark Silence in Suburbia)

Side note: did you know the country of Sweden offers tax breaks to people who choose to repair household appliances and bicycles instead of throwing them away?

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The New Age of Ceramics: A New Book Explores the Cutting Edge of Ceramic Art 

Jess Riva Cooper

Jess Riva Cooper

Over the last few decades, artists working with ceramics have begun to push the medium in dramatic new directions, producing wildly innovative sculptures with a craft that’s existed almost as long as human civilization itself. No longer satisfied with traditional decorative vases or functional objects, these artists have embraced a wide variety of refreshing approaches that incorporate humor, environmental awareness, and an array of unusual techniques. Not only are they building things up, but also tearing them down, reducing objects to shards before repurposing the fragments, or pummeling their own creations into damaged permanence.

Nearly 40 such artists have been gathered into a new book out this week from Gingko Press titled The New Age of Ceramics by Hannah Stouffer. The publication includes 180 photos of in-process details, intimate studio visits, and final works from artists like Zemer Peled, Jessica Harrison, Jess Riva Cooper, Jon Alameda, Hitomi Hosono, and many others. The book release was accompanied by an exhibition at the Dave Frey Gallery that runs through December 9th, 2016.

“The tangibility of the material is something I feel really drawn to, and feel there is a great importance in sharing that, as we stray further from this connection to traditional mediums and become more invested with technology,” Stouffer shares with Colossal.

The New Age of Ceramics is now available in bookstores and through The Colossal Shop.

Hitomi Hosono

Hitomi Hosono

Jennifer McCurdy

Jennifer McCurdy

Livia Marin

Livia Marin

Crystal Morey

Crystal Morey

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Kate McDowell

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Richard Shaw

Zemer Peled

Zemer Peled

Claire Shaw

Claire Shaw

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Chairs and Other Sculptural Objects That Melt Into the Floor by Tatiana Blass 

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“Tail Chair” (2005), wood chair and lacquered wood, 100x150x200 cm, images courtesy of Tatiana Blass

In an installation titled Tails from 2006, Tatiana Blass (previously), presented several wooden chairs and other sculptural objects that seem to melt into the ground. The works merge with the floor through additions of specifically cut lacquered wood or fiber glass, solid forms that give the illusion of both brightly colored and woodgrain patterned liquid. The Brazilian artist is represented by Galeria Millan in Sao Paulo. You can see more of her past and present works on her website.

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“Tail Chair” (2005), wood chair and lacquered wood, 100x150x200 cm

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“Sofia” (2006), wood and lacquered painting, 200x180x150 cm

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“Golden Cashew” (2006), wood chair and lacquered wood, 100x150x200 cm

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“Tail #2” (2005), acrylic ball, lacquered wood, and fiber glass, 40x180x150 cm

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Installation view, “Tails,” (2006)

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Intimate Embroidered Portraits by Danielle Clough 

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Cape Town-based artist Danielle Clough (previously here and here) embroiders portraits of friends and loved ones, adapting black and white images of subjects into multi-colored works. By working from black and white images the resulting works are not tied to the colors present in the original images, creating vibrant pieces that feature bright oranges, purples, and blues.

The portraits featured here were produced by Clough for the upcoming book Queer Africa II, a collection of new stories about love on the continent of Africa. The editors, Makhosazana Xaba and Karen Martin, were drawn to Clough’s work for the publication because of the conceptual linkage of her layered yarn to the personal narratives told in the book, which Zaba explained “adds meaning and speaks to the zigzagging nature of our lives.”

Queer Africa II will be published next month through MaThoko’s Books and be available online through both Amazon and African Books Collective. You can see more portraits by Clough on her Instagram, and take a look into the artist’s process on her blog.

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The Japanese Museum of Rocks That Look Like Faces 

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In Chichibu, Japan, two hours northwest of Tokyo, there’s an odd museum; perhaps the only one of its kind. It’s called the Chinsekikan (which means hall of curious rocks) and it houses over 1700 rocks that resemble human faces.

The museum houses all kinds of jinmenseki, or rock with a human face, including celebrity lookalikes like Elvis Presley. And according to a 2013 post on Kotaku, there are also movie and video game character rocks like E.T., Donkey Kong and Nemo.

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“Elvis Presley”

According to the Sankei, the museum is currently run by Yoshiko Hayama, the wife of the original owner who passed away in 2010. But it was his rock collection that started it all. An avid collector, the late Shozo Hayama spent 50 years collecting rocks that looked like faces. His only requirement was that nature be the only artist.

There are currently so many rocks on display that some don’t even have names. So the owner occasionally invites visitors to name the rocks. The Chichibu Chinsekikan (Gmap) is a 10-min walk from Kagemori Station. However, it’s recommended that you call ahead if you plan to visit because the museum is known to unexpectedly close for personal reasons. You can explore more photos on Another Tokyo and Yukawa.net. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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Photo courtesy Sankei Photo

Photo courtesy Sankei Photo

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Head curator, Yoshiko Hayama.

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New Glitched-Out Rugs Designed from Traditional Textiles by Faig Ahmed 

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All images courtesy of Faig Ahmed Studio

Initially interested in the complexities of modern and ancient language, artist Faig Ahmed (previously) translated his fascination to the intricacies of carpet patterns, especially those from Turkey, Persia, India, and Caucasus. Distorting their original composition, Ahmed produces designs that break out of the traditional shape of luxury carpets, producing works that seem to split, drip, and separate on the wall.

His latest textile piece were created on a traditional loom, contemporary glitches and manipulations formed through age-old weaving techniques. Many of these recent works are also linked to Ahmed’s interests in genetic research and quantum physics, the mutated rugs serving as his attempt to display the impossibility of finding symmetry in nature and a chaotic world.

This past year Ahmed’s rugs were featured in shows at the Museum of Fine Art Boston, Bellevue Art Museum, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland, the Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design, and Museum of Old and New Art in Tasmania. His most recent exhibition, Source Code, opens November 17 at Sapar Contemporary in New York City and runs through January 5, 2017.

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