5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starn’s Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture
Photo by Eli Posner, Israel Museum

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture
Photo by Eli Posner, Israel Museum

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture
Photos by Eli Posner, Israel Museum

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture

5,000 Arms to Hold You: Climb Mike and Doug Starns Largest Bamboo Construction Ever at the Israel Museum Israel installation bamboo architecture

Towering 52 feet (16 meters) into the air, 5,000 Arms to Hold You is the latest bamboo installation by artists Doug and Mike Starn at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. This is the 9th construction in twin brother’s Big Bambú series that seeks to explore how order is created from the chaos of life through elaborate bamboo sculptures. For this new piece the duo worked with a team of mountain climbers to help assemble the precarious form using over 10,000 bamboo poles over a month-long period. It is the largest and most complex sculptural installation they have ever undertaken.

“The concept of Big Bambú has nothing to do with bamboo,” Mike Starn tells the Israel Museum. “Big Bambú represents the invisible architecture of life and living things. It is the random interdependence of moments, trajectories intersecting, and actions becoming interaction, creating growth and change.” “It is philosophic engineering, a demonstration of chaotic interdependence,” adds Doug.

5,000 Arms to Hold You opened to the public on June 16th, and visitors are invited to explore the interactive maze from all angles, including the opportunity to ascend to the very top. You can learn more on the project’s dedicated website, and see many more bamboo installations by the Starn brothers here.

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Bounce Below: A Giant Network of Trampolines Suspended in an Abandoned Welsh Slate Mine

Bounce Below: A Giant Network of Trampolines Suspended in an Abandoned Welsh Slate Mine trampolines playgrounds caves

Bounce Below: A Giant Network of Trampolines Suspended in an Abandoned Welsh Slate Mine trampolines playgrounds caves

Bounce Below: A Giant Network of Trampolines Suspended in an Abandoned Welsh Slate Mine trampolines playgrounds caves

Bounce Below: A Giant Network of Trampolines Suspended in an Abandoned Welsh Slate Mine trampolines playgrounds caves

Bounce Below: A Giant Network of Trampolines Suspended in an Abandoned Welsh Slate Mine trampolines playgrounds caves

If you’re afraid of heights, caves, the dark, suffer from claustrophobia or vertigo, this might not be for you, but if not, a small Welsh town has the perfect subterranean adventure for you: the world’s largest underground trampoline. Just unveiled in Blaenau Ffestiniog, North Wales, Bounce Below is a network of trampolines and slides mounted to the walls of an abandoned slate mine at heights of 20 feet to 180 feet off the ground. Visitors are welcome to climb, bounce, slide, and jump in the netting amidst a technicolor light show. Tickets are available online and the space will open to the public July 4th, 2014. (via My Modern Met)

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Modern Ruins: An Artist’s Vehicle Designed to Traverse 9,000 Kilometers of Abandoned Railways in Mexico

Modern Ruins: An Artist’s Vehicle Designed to Traverse 9,000 Kilometers of Abandoned Railways in Mexico travel trains railway Mexico

All images courtesy the artists and the Arts Catalyst

Modern Ruins: An Artist’s Vehicle Designed to Traverse 9,000 Kilometers of Abandoned Railways in Mexico travel trains railway Mexico

Modern Ruins: An Artist’s Vehicle Designed to Traverse 9,000 Kilometers of Abandoned Railways in Mexico travel trains railway Mexico

Modern Ruins: An Artist’s Vehicle Designed to Traverse 9,000 Kilometers of Abandoned Railways in Mexico travel trains railway Mexico

Modern Ruins: An Artist’s Vehicle Designed to Traverse 9,000 Kilometers of Abandoned Railways in Mexico travel trains railway Mexico

Modern Ruins: An Artist’s Vehicle Designed to Traverse 9,000 Kilometers of Abandoned Railways in Mexico travel trains railway Mexico

Modern Ruins: An Artist’s Vehicle Designed to Traverse 9,000 Kilometers of Abandoned Railways in Mexico travel trains railway Mexico

What do you do with the abandoned railways that once held the promise of trans-continental linkage and progress? Some have converted them into tourist-friendly pathways. But Mexican artists and brothers Ivan Puig (previously) and Andrés Padilla Domene decided to traverse the nearly 9,000 km of railway in Mexico and Ecuador that, in 1995, was abandoned and left to decay. But they didn’t travel in any old fashion. In a project that ran from 2010 to 2012 the artists rode in a striking silver road-rail vehicle called SEFT-1, which they designed and built themselves so as to travel both on rail and road.

The multi-year journey, which was documented online, explored abandoned rail but also the notion of modern ruins, and “how the ideology of progress is imprinted onto historic landscapes.” (via Hyperallergic)

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A Multi-Camera 360° Panoramic Timelapse of the Stars by Vincent Brady

A Multi Camera 360° Panoramic Timelapse of the Stars by Vincent Brady video art stars space panoramic

Michigan-based photographer Vincent Brady uses an elaborate 4-camera rig and lots of software to capture what he calls Planetary Panoramas. These are somewhat similar to the tiny planet videos we’ve seen the last few months, but the results are quite a bit more dramatic. He shares about his technique:

While experimenting with different photography tricks and techniques back in 2012, I was shooting 360 degree panoramas in the daytime and long exposures of the stars streaking in the sky at night. It suddenly became clear that the potential to combine the two techniques could be a trip! Since the Earth is rotating at a steady 1,040 mph I created a custom rig of 4 cameras with fisheye lenses to capture the entire night-sky in motion. Thus the images show the stars rotating around the north star as well as the effect of the southern pole as well and a 360 degree panorama of the scene on Earth. Each camera is doing nonstop long exposures, typically about 1 minute consecutively for the life of the camera battery. Usually about 3 hours. I then made a script to stitch all the thousands of these panoramas into this time-lapse.

You can learn more about how Brady makes these and see more of his photography over on his website. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Embroidered Silhouettes by Nastasja Duthois

Embroidered Silhouettes by Nastasja Duthois silhouettes embroidery

Embroidered Silhouettes by Nastasja Duthois silhouettes embroidery

Embroidered Silhouettes by Nastasja Duthois silhouettes embroidery

Embroidered Silhouettes by Nastasja Duthois silhouettes embroidery

Embroidered Silhouettes by Nastasja Duthois silhouettes embroidery

Embroidered Silhouettes by Nastasja Duthois silhouettes embroidery

Embroidered Silhouettes by Nastasja Duthois silhouettes embroidery

Embroidered Silhouettes by Nastasja Duthois silhouettes embroidery

Embroidered Silhouettes by Nastasja Duthois silhouettes embroidery

Artist Nastasja Duthois creates large installations and small-scale embroidered artworks that explore aspects of shadow and negative space. Though composed of thousands of straight sewn lines reminiscent of crosshatching, the final pieces are generally organic in form from the silhouettes of dogs and animals to more complex landscapes. You can see more of her work over on BASE and on her website. (via Lustik)

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New Impossibly Tiny Landscapes Painted on Food by Hasan Kale

New Impossibly Tiny Landscapes Painted on Food by Hasan Kale painting miniature landscapes Istanbul food

New Impossibly Tiny Landscapes Painted on Food by Hasan Kale painting miniature landscapes Istanbul food

New Impossibly Tiny Landscapes Painted on Food by Hasan Kale painting miniature landscapes Istanbul food

New Impossibly Tiny Landscapes Painted on Food by Hasan Kale painting miniature landscapes Istanbul food

New Impossibly Tiny Landscapes Painted on Food by Hasan Kale painting miniature landscapes Istanbul food

New Impossibly Tiny Landscapes Painted on Food by Hasan Kale painting miniature landscapes Istanbul food

New Impossibly Tiny Landscapes Painted on Food by Hasan Kale painting miniature landscapes Istanbul food

New Impossibly Tiny Landscapes Painted on Food by Hasan Kale painting miniature landscapes Istanbul food

From onion peels to kiwi seeds or even bits of chocolate, it seems any canvas is sufficient for Turkish artist Hasan Kale (previously) as long as it meets the requirement of being incredibly tiny. Hasan delights in the challenge of depicting landscapes of his native Istanbul in the most infinitesimal of brush strokes, a feat that requires the use of a magnifying glass to appreciate the details of each piece. While the longevity of each object he paints is questionable, the steadiness of his hand is impressive to witness. See much more over on Facebook. (via Illusion)

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Beauty Beyond Nature: Stunning Artistic Glass Paperweights by Paul J. Stankard

Beauty Beyond Nature: Stunning Artistic Glass Paperweights by Paul J. Stankard sculpture glass
Honeybees Swarming a Floral Hive Cluster. Photo by Ron Farina.

Though it may seem implausible, these translucent orbs bursting with activity and life are made entirely from glass by New Jersey-based artist Paul Stankard, largely considered to be the father of modern glass paperweights. While many will find his work instantly recognizable, if you’re like me, you might have been unaware that modern glass paperweights existed. Stankard is a pioneer in the studio glass movement and his techniques have helped change the course of artistic glass for the last few decades.

After battling undiagnosed dyslexia for his entire youth (at one time graduating the bottom of his class), Stankard struggled greatly to identify his life’s calling. While in college he discovered scientific glass blowing, the manual process of creating scientific instruments out of glass for use in laboratories. He was instantly hooked and for 10 years worked with industrial glass. Eventually the pressure of a growing family at home lead to an experiment with the creation of glass paperweights in his garage to supplement his income.

When Stankard suddenly directed a decade of industrial glassworking techniques into the interpretation of flowers, bees, vines, and leaves encased in glass, it wasn’t long before an art dealer discovered his work and he began to create art full-time. His pieces now appear in over 60 museums around the world including the Smithsonian, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Louvre.

You can see much more of his work on his website, at the Corning Museum of Glass, and in his book, Homage to Nature.

Beauty Beyond Nature: Stunning Artistic Glass Paperweights by Paul J. Stankard sculpture glass
Tea Rose Bouquet with Mask. Photo by Douglas Schaible.

Beauty Beyond Nature: Stunning Artistic Glass Paperweights by Paul J. Stankard sculpture glass
Golden Orbs Floating in a Sphere. Photo by Ron Farina.

Beauty Beyond Nature: Stunning Artistic Glass Paperweights by Paul J. Stankard sculpture glass
Photo by Ron Farina.

Beauty Beyond Nature: Stunning Artistic Glass Paperweights by Paul J. Stankard sculpture glass
Fecundity Bouquet. Photo by Ron Farina.

Beauty Beyond Nature: Stunning Artistic Glass Paperweights by Paul J. Stankard sculpture glass
Golden Orbs Floral Cluster. Photo by Ron Farina.

Beauty Beyond Nature: Stunning Artistic Glass Paperweights by Paul J. Stankard sculpture glass

Beauty Beyond Nature: Stunning Artistic Glass Paperweights by Paul J. Stankard sculpture glass
Photos by Ron Farina.

Beauty Beyond Nature: Stunning Artistic Glass Paperweights by Paul J. Stankard sculpture glass
Photo by Ron Farina.

Almost all of the photographs in this article were provided by Ron Farina.

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