New Birds Painted on Pharmaceutical Packaging by Sara Landeta 

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Artist Sara Landeta (previously) continues to use the back of used medicine packaging as a canvas for depictions of various birds. The artist most recently created a series of 120 paintings for her exhibition titled “Medicine as Metaphor” at gallery 6mas1 last year. From the Jealous Curator about the poignancy of the series:

The project includes a collection of 120 boxes of drugs that have been consumed by different patients to overcome their illnesses. All boxes are illustrated inside with a broad classification of birds from different families, being the only animal that although it gives it a meaning of freedom, because it is the only one able to connect with the earth and the sky, is also one of the main animals in captivity. This juxtaposition of the natural and the synthetic interprets the patient as a captive animal, and the bird as its metaphor.

Draw a collection of birds inside these boxes holding a single reflection ; l will learn to be birds in captivity, but they are wanting to fly, and that is what keeps them alive.

You can see more of Landeta’s paintings here. (via The Jealous Curator)

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Cherry Blossoms Flood the Inokashira Park Lake in Tokyo 

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

Every spring, photographer Danilo Dungo spends time at Inokashira Park in Tokyo, famous for its abundance of blooming cherry trees. The photographer has become a master at capturing the event from all angles, especially with aerial shots that show the pink flowers covering the nearby lake. Seen here are a handful of shots from the last two years, but you can explore much more on his NatGeo Your Shot page. (via Fubiz)

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

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Photograph © Danilo Dungo

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An Octopus Painted With 95-Million-Year-Old Ink 

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Esther van Hulsen at work on an octopus drawing using 95 million-year-old ink. Photo by Stian Steinsli

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Photo of the fossil on the left by Hans Arne Nakrem, photo of the powder on the right by Esther van Hulsen.

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Image of the completed octopus ink drawing. Photo by Esther van Hulsen

Dutch wildlife artist Esther van Hulsen was recently given an assignment unlike her typical drawings of birds and mammals from life—a chance to draw a prehistoric octopus 95 million years after its death. Paleontologist Jørn Hurum supplied Hulsen with ink extracted from a fossil found in Lebanon in 2009, received as a gift from the PalVenn Museum in 2014. After several millennia Hulson was surprised to find that the color had remained so vibrant, preserved all of this time in the cephalopod’s ink sac. “Knowing that this animal has used this ink to survive is absolutely amazing,” said van Hulsen of the prehistoric ink.

The idea to make such a drawing came from the story of Mary Anning, an English paleontologist and fossil collector who made a similar drawing from a fossil’s ink sac in the 1800s. Hulsen’s replication of the octopus now hangs beside its material origin in the Natural History Museum in Oslo. (via MetaFilter)

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Japanese Lego Master Builds Delicious-Looking Creations From Blocks 

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I don’t think I’ve ever felt so hungry looking at Lego blocks! A Japanese Lego creator who goes by the nickname Tary has sculpted one of the most delicious-looking collections of food made entirely from Lego blocks. From fruit and vegetables to bento boxes, junk food and even desserts, Tary has almost all major food groups covered!

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Of course Tary doesn’t only create food. He sculpts Gundam robots and Star Wars characters, each more impressive than the last. But it’s really his food creations that have won him the most recognition. Like that pizza slice! Who could have thought dripping cheese could be so realistically portrayed with hard blocks?

One of Tary’s most recent creations was the Tendon tempura rice bowl. Using a combination of white blocks for the rice and yellow and orange blocks for the deep-fried shrimp tempura, he created a magnificent-looking meal that won 1st place in an original Lego model contest. The entries are on display through May 31, 2016 at ClickBrick Lego store in Odaiba, Tokyo (located within the Venus Fort shopping complex – Gmap) if you’d like to visit. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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A Sculptural Geometric Pop-Up Book By Tauba Auerbach 

Tauba Auerbach (previously) partnered with Printed Matter to publish the project [2,3], a large-scale book that exists between a children’s pop-up and sculptural object. The project folds neatly into its own custom sleeve, and contains six separate paper sculptures that spring to life when opened. Director Sam Fleischner filmed the project’s unboxing, catching the sweetly satisfying sounds of the books creaking to open, and the objects inside slowing falling into place. You can see more of Auerbach’s designs on Instagram. (via Juxtapoz)

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A Wood Turned Bamboo Death Star by Frank Howarth 

In this new timelapse video, woodworker Frank Howarth (previously) demonstrates how he designed and constructed a replica of the Star Wars’ Death Star out of bamboo. The Portland-based designer, who also has a degree in architecture from Harvard, shares much of his behind-the-scenes processes through his wildly popular YouTube channel. I expected to skip through different parts of the video, but Howarth has an uncanny ability to film himself working, it really is worth watching the whole thing straight through. Even the sound design is great.

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