An Illuminated Musical Swing Set Installed at Green Mountain Falls in Colorado

An Illuminated Musical Swing Set Installed at Green Mountain Falls in Colorado swings light installation Colorado

An Illuminated Musical Swing Set Installed at Green Mountain Falls in Colorado swings light installation Colorado

An Illuminated Musical Swing Set Installed at Green Mountain Falls in Colorado swings light installation Colorado

An Illuminated Musical Swing Set Installed at Green Mountain Falls in Colorado swings light installation Colorado

An Illuminated Musical Swing Set Installed at Green Mountain Falls in Colorado swings light installation Colorado

An Illuminated Musical Swing Set Installed at Green Mountain Falls in Colorado swings light installation Colorado

An Illuminated Musical Swing Set Installed at Green Mountain Falls in Colorado swings light installation Colorado

An Illuminated Musical Swing Set Installed at Green Mountain Falls in Colorado swings light installation Colorado

Canadian design collective Daily Tous Les Jours (previously) was recently invited to bring their fantastic musical light swing installation to the Green Box Arts Festival in Green Mountain Falls, Colorado. The interactive swing set titled simply, The Swings, is comprised of illuminated panels that also trigger audible tones that harmonize as people swing. As more and more people join in the act of swinging turns into randomly improvised melody and light show. From their project site:

The Swings allow participants to make music with their entire bodies, to connect to one another and to have a sense of ownership of public space due to the music they create. The result is a giant collective instrument that brings together people of all ages and backgrounds. The project offers a new experience in collective music making, available to enliven urban spaces, festivals, special events, and more.

The Swings were on view through July 11th of this month, but the entire installation is now on tour. If you’re interested in bringing it to your own arts event, get in touch at the bottom of this page.

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Mesmerizing Studio Visits with Five South Korean Master Ceramicists

Mesmerizing Studio Visits with Five South Korean Master Ceramicists ceramics

Icheon Ceramics Village in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea, is home to over 300 ceramics studios where artists use traditional techniques to produce a wide range of functional pottery and artwork. Nearly 40 of the studios still use wood-fired kilns. This video filmed by the American Museum of Ceramic Art shows five ceramic masters from Icheon at work in their studios. The process of creating is almost more beautiful than the finished pieces. (via Huffington Post)

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Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen-Chih

Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen Chih bamboo Australia architecture

all images courtesy Cave Urban

Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen Chih bamboo Australia architecture

Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen Chih bamboo Australia architecture

Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen Chih bamboo Australia architecture

Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen Chih bamboo Australia architecture

Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen Chih bamboo Australia architecture

Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen Chih bamboo Australia architecture

Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen Chih bamboo Australia architecture

Using 600 poles of bamboo and 70 radiata pine logs all harvested locally, Taiwanese Artist Wang Wen-Chih created a massive installation that served as the entrance to the Woodford Folk Festival in Australia. Working with the Sydney-based architecture and design collective Cave Urban, a team of 40 workers and volunteers spent 3 weeks building the structure. Each bamboo pole was split into 4-5 pieces and weaved together like a basket. Woven Sky, which rises 15m high and is 100m long, was completed late last year, just in time for the music festival, and served an impressive entrance point into the amphitheater stage.

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Surreal Graphite Drawings by ‘Violaine & Jeremy’ Merge Nature and Humor

Surreal Graphite Drawings by Violaine & Jeremy Merge Nature and Humor surreal illustration drawing animals

Surreal Graphite Drawings by Violaine & Jeremy Merge Nature and Humor surreal illustration drawing animals

Surreal Graphite Drawings by Violaine & Jeremy Merge Nature and Humor surreal illustration drawing animals

Surreal Graphite Drawings by Violaine & Jeremy Merge Nature and Humor surreal illustration drawing animals

Surreal Graphite Drawings by Violaine & Jeremy Merge Nature and Humor surreal illustration drawing animals

Surreal Graphite Drawings by Violaine & Jeremy Merge Nature and Humor surreal illustration drawing animals

Surreal Graphite Drawings by Violaine & Jeremy Merge Nature and Humor surreal illustration drawing animals

Surreal Graphite Drawings by Violaine & Jeremy Merge Nature and Humor surreal illustration drawing animals

Violaine & Jeremy is a graphic design
and illustration studio based in Paris formed by Violaine Orsoni and Jeremy Schneider. The duo collaborate on a wide range of projects including the design and layout of Influencia magazine, indentity projects, and album covers. Among their best work are these astounding graphite drawings of quirky animals adorned with beards of wildlife and other unexpected characters. You can see much more over on Behance.

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Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric chocolate

Hidden Geometric Patterns Gradually Revealed inside Giant Chocolate Cylinder geometric chocolate

For a major retrospective of Dutch furniture designer and architect Gerrit Rietveld, the team at Studio Wieki Somers collaborated with chocolatier Rafael Mutter to create Chocolate Mill. The piece was comprised of a giant cylindrical chocolate block that was carefully organized in 10 stacked layers, with flavored shapes used to create different geometric patterns. As a crank-turned blade similar to a cheese slicer grazed shavings off the top, the hidden layers were slowly revealed. You can watch a timelapse of the piece in the video above. (via Designboom, Design You Trust)

Update: A little bit more background in this video from Robert Andriessen.

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Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#45 (Bulau)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 24 x 29 1/8 inches (all photographs courtesy the artist and RH Contemporary Art)

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#41 (Rotterbach und Hacksiefen)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#1 (Stolpe-Süd)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 24 x 29 1/8 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#54 (Altwarmbüchener Moor)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#58 (Projensdorfer Gehölz)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#66 (Mascheroder Holz)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#79 (Münsterbusch)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#83 (Beerenbruch)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Although WWII ended almost 70 years ago, its legacy lives on: in photographs, memories and on our landscape. Walk through the forests of Germany and you’ll see craters or, scars, as German photographer Henning Rogge calls them, that are the aftermath of bombs being dropped from planes. Rogge has been tracking down these craters and photographing them, capturing moments, after decades have elapsed, of earth slowly healing her wounds. An unknowing hiker might easily mistake them for small ponds and nothing more, which is perhaps why these masked scars are so haunting. Rogge’s photographs are part of a group show titled The Beautiful Changes, which is on display at RH Contemporary Art in New York City through September 13, 2014. (via Hyperallergic)

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New in the Colossal Shop: Wearable Cities and Stars by Slow Factory

New in the Colossal Shop: Wearable Cities and Stars by Slow Factory stars space fashion colossal clothing

New in the Colossal Shop: Wearable Cities and Stars by Slow Factory stars space fashion colossal clothing

New in the Colossal Shop: Wearable Cities and Stars by Slow Factory stars space fashion colossal clothing

New in the Colossal Shop: Wearable Cities and Stars by Slow Factory stars space fashion colossal clothing

In a novel intersection of fashion and science, New York-based Slow Factory is utilizing imagery from NASA to create lines of translucent scarves. Their most recent collection, Cities by Night, is a series scarves imprinted with imagery of London, New York, and Paris captured at night from satellites and aboard the International Space Station. A second collection, Floating in Space, includes several breathtaking photographs of various nebulae captured by the Hubble. Slow Factory was founded by designer Celine Semaan Vernon, a native of Beirut who now lives and works in New York City. Several of their pieces are now available in the Colossal Shop.

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