Nature Imitates Andy Goldsworthy: Rare Ice Disk Forms in North Dakota River

When I first saw this giant rotating ice disk spotted in North Dakota this week, I assumed it had to be some kind of human-created object, perhaps a new piece by famed land artist Andy Goldsworthy. The video above was shot by retired engineer George Loegering while hiking along the Sheyenne River. He estimates the rotating disk was some 55 feet in diameter and must have been forming for some time. The St. Paul Pioneer Press spoke with National Weather Service hydrologist Allen Schlag:

The cold, dense air—the air pressure Saturday in nearby Fargo was a record high for the city for the month of November, according to Gust—turned the river water into ice, but since the water was relatively warm it didn’t happen all at once. Floating bits of ice got caught in the eddy and started to spin in a circle.

“It’s not a continuous sheet of ice,” Schlag said. “If you were to throw a grapefruit-size rock on it, it would go through. It’s not a solid piece of ice—it’s a collection of ice cubes.”

Nature Imitates Andy Goldsworthy: Rare Ice Disk Forms in North Dakota River rivers nature ice
Photo by Brook Tyler

Nature Imitates Andy Goldsworthy: Rare Ice Disk Forms in North Dakota River rivers nature ice
Photo by Pål Sigurd

Nature Imitates Andy Goldsworthy: Rare Ice Disk Forms in North Dakota River rivers nature ice
Photo by Evan Gregg / Reservoir Productions

Although extremely rare, ice disks do indeed appear naturally from time to time when conditions are perfect. Above are a few examples of people who have been lucky enough to stumble onto one while holding a camera. Learn more over on St. Paul Pioneer Press. (thnx Ben + all)

A Herd of 99 Lifelike Animals Drink From a Pool at QAGOMA

A Herd of 99 Lifelike Animals Drink From a Pool at QAGOMA sculpture installation animals Heritage, 2013. 99 life-sized replicas of animals, water, sand, drip mechanism. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

A Herd of 99 Lifelike Animals Drink From a Pool at QAGOMA sculpture installation animals Heritage, 2013. 99 life-sized replicas of animals, water, sand, drip mechanism. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

A Herd of 99 Lifelike Animals Drink From a Pool at QAGOMA sculpture installation animals Heritage, 2013. 99 life-sized replicas of animals, water, sand, drip mechanism. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

A Herd of 99 Lifelike Animals Drink From a Pool at QAGOMA sculpture installation animals Heritage, 2013. 99 life-sized replicas of animals, water, sand, drip mechanism. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

A Herd of 99 Lifelike Animals Drink From a Pool at QAGOMA sculpture installation animals Heritage, 2013. 99 life-sized replicas of animals, water, sand, drip mechanism. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Mark Sherwood, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

A Herd of 99 Lifelike Animals Drink From a Pool at QAGOMA sculpture installation animals
Head On, 2006. 99 life-sized replicas of wolves and glass wall. Wolves: gauze, resin, and hide. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

A Herd of 99 Lifelike Animals Drink From a Pool at QAGOMA sculpture installation animals
Head On, 2006. 99 life-sized replicas of wolves and glass wall. Wolves: gauze, resin, and hide. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

A Herd of 99 Lifelike Animals Drink From a Pool at QAGOMA sculpture installation animals
Head On, 2006. 99 life-sized replicas of wolves and glass wall. Wolves: gauze, resin, and hide. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

A Herd of 99 Lifelike Animals Drink From a Pool at QAGOMA sculpture installation animals
Head On, 2006. 99 life-sized replicas of wolves and glass wall. Wolves: gauze, resin, and hide. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

A Herd of 99 Lifelike Animals Drink From a Pool at QAGOMA sculpture installation animals
Artist Cai Guo-Qiang sculpting an animal for Heritage. Photograph: Cai Canhuang.

A Herd of 99 Lifelike Animals Drink From a Pool at QAGOMA sculpture installation animals
Artist Cai Guo-Qiang sculpting an animal for Heritage. Photograph: Cai Canhuang.

Inspired by a trip to Stradbroke Island in Australia back in 2011, artist Cai Guo-Qiang began work on his newest large-scale installation, Heritage, a flock of 99 life-size replicas of wild animals including giraffes, pandas, lions, tigers, and kangaroos drinking from a pool of blue water. The piece is included along with several additional artworks as part of his first solo exhibition in Australia, Falling Back to Earth, at Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art in South Brisbane.

Also included in the exhibition is Guo-Qiang’s famous airborne cascade of 99 wolves titled Head On, where the animals seem to launch themselves into the air only to crash into a large glass wall and begin the cycle again. You can see more behind-the-scenes photos in the video above and on the artists blog. Falling Back to Earth runs through May 11, 2014.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Unveiled Obscurity, 2013. Mixed media assemblage. 32″ x 46″ x 12″.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Unveiled Obscurity, detail.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Neo-Hellenism, 2013. Mixed media assemblage. 37″ x 35″ x 11″.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Neo-Hellenism, detail.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Intelligent Redesign, 2013. Mixed media assemblage. 40″ x 50″ x 12″.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Intelligent Redesign, detail.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Expulsion, 2013. Mixed media assemblage. 24″ x 32″ x 9″.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Expulsion, detail.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Der Ubermensch of the Post-Post World Calamity Variety, 2013. Mixed media assemblage. 54″ x 48″ x 16″.

This week Kansas-based artist Kris Kuksi (previously) opened his fourth solo show, Revival, at Joshua Liner Gallery. Kuksi continues his use of ornate assemblage to create wildly complex sculptures that comment on history, life, death, and spiritual conflict. In the words of director Guillermo del Toro:

“A postindustrial Rococo master, Kris Kuksi obsessively arranges characters and architecture with an exquisite sense of drama. Instead of stones and shells he uses screaming plastic soldiers, miniature engine blocks, towering spires and assorted debris to form his landscapes. The political, spiritual, and material conflict within these shrines is enacted under the calm gaze of remote deities and august statuary. Kuksi manages to evoke, at once, a sanctum and a mausoleum for our suffocated spirit.

Revival will be on view through January 18, 2014 and you can see many more pieces from the exhibition in this gallery.

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Part architectural intervention and part optical illusion, Lucid Stead is a recently unveiled installation by artist Phillip K Smith III in Joshua Tree, California. The artist modified an existing 70-year-old homesteader shack by introducing mirrors to create the illusion of transparency, as the structure now takes on the lighting characteristics of anything around it. LED lighting and other custom electronic components were further installed within the building’s interior to illuminate from the interior at night. Smith says of the installation, “Lucid Stead is about tapping into the quiet and the pace of change of the desert. When you slow down and align yourself with the desert, the project begins to unfold before you. It reveals that it is about light and shadow, reflected light, projected light, and change.”

You can see more photos over at Royale Projects. All photos courtesy Royale Projects. (via Dezeen)

Interactive Billboards Display the Destination or Origin of Airplanes Overhead

Interactive Billboards Display the Destination or Origin of Airplanes Overhead interactive flight advertising

Created by the team at Ogilvy 12th Floor for British Airways, these awesome billboards installed in London’s Piccadilly Circus and Chiswick interactively display information about the flight that appears immediately overhead. Using custom-built surveillance technology the billboards display the flight number and route information in sync with a recorded video of a child who appears to be pointing at each plane as it soars above. Pretty fun. (via PSFK)

A New Book of Reflective Vivian Maier Self-Portraits

A New Book of Reflective Vivian Maier Self Portraits self portait portraits
Self portrait by Vivian Maier courtesy powerHouse Books

A New Book of Reflective Vivian Maier Self Portraits self portait portraits
Self portrait by Vivian Maier courtesy powerHouse Books

A New Book of Reflective Vivian Maier Self Portraits self portait portraits
Self portrait by Vivian Maier courtesy powerHouse Books

A New Book of Reflective Vivian Maier Self Portraits self portait portraits
Self portrait by Vivian Maier courtesy powerHouse Books

A New Book of Reflective Vivian Maier Self Portraits self portait portraits
Self portrait by Vivian Maier courtesy powerHouse Books

A New Book of Reflective Vivian Maier Self Portraits self portait portraits

Published just last week Vivian Maier: Self-Portraits is a newly published collection of the mysterious Chicago photographer’s self-portraits. If you’re unfamiliar with Maier’s amazing story you can get caught up here. The book contains about 60 never-before-seen black-and-white and four-color self-portraits culled from the immense archive of photos assembled by the book’s editor John Maloof. This blogger is currently demonstrating massive self-restraint in not using Oxford Dictionaries word of the year. You’re welcome.

Emergent Behavior: New Swarms of Hovering Objects Photographed in Place by Thomas Jackson

Emergent Behavior: New Swarms of Hovering Objects Photographed in Place by Thomas Jackson multiples
Cups No. 2 / Courtesy Thomas Jackson

Emergent Behavior: New Swarms of Hovering Objects Photographed in Place by Thomas Jackson multiples
Glow Sticks No. 2 / Courtesy Thomas Jackson

Emergent Behavior: New Swarms of Hovering Objects Photographed in Place by Thomas Jackson multiples
Marshmallows No. 1 / Courtesy Thomas Jackson

Emergent Behavior: New Swarms of Hovering Objects Photographed in Place by Thomas Jackson multiples
Plates No. 3 / Courtesy Thomas Jackson

Emergent Behavior: New Swarms of Hovering Objects Photographed in Place by Thomas Jackson multiples
Post-Its No. 2 / Courtesy Thomas Jackson

Emergent Behavior: New Swarms of Hovering Objects Photographed in Place by Thomas Jackson multiples
Straws No. 2 / Courtesy Thomas Jackson

Emergent Behavior: New Swarms of Hovering Objects Photographed in Place by Thomas Jackson multiples
Thank You Bads No. 1 / Courtesy Thomas Jackson

Emergent Behavior: New Swarms of Hovering Objects Photographed in Place by Thomas Jackson multiples
Yarn No. 2 / Courtesy Thomas Jackson

Though we’ve featured these amazing swarm photos by Thomas Jackson here on Colossal several times in the last few years, the photographer continues to perfect his technique and has published many new images since we checked in last year. In the past, Jackson suspended the multitudes of paper Post-It notes, plates, or neon glowsticks on a framework of monofilament lines which he would then digitally erase in Photoshop in post-production (the marshmallow photo above is the last photo he created using that method). Jackson shares via email that he’s now discovered better materials that are nearly invisible at normal viewing distance and just barely discernable when viewing prints close-up, ensuring Photoshop only comes into play for standard color and contrast adjustments. Even the blurring you see is created by the wind.

See much more of Jackson’s latest work over on his website.

Faces of Models Transformed Into 2D Images with Face Paint

Faces of Models Transformed Into 2D Images with Face Paint face painting

Faces of Models Transformed Into 2D Images with Face Paint face painting

Faces of Models Transformed Into 2D Images with Face Paint face painting

Faces of Models Transformed Into 2D Images with Face Paint face painting

Faces of Models Transformed Into 2D Images with Face Paint face painting

Faces of Models Transformed Into 2D Images with Face Paint face painting

Faces of Models Transformed Into 2D Images with Face Paint face painting

In this ongoing collaboration between make-up artist Valeriya Kutsan and Russian photographer Alexander Khokhlov, the faces of models are seemingly transformed from three dimensional paintings and designs using face paint. The first series of black and white photos titled Weird Beauty was released last year, and the duo brought on digital artist Veronica Ershova who helped retouch a new collection of images inspired by poster art titled 2D or not 2D. These new color images seem to have a bit more digital assistance but are still amazing to look at. See much more here.

Page 36 of 385«...35363738...»