A Towering Iceberg and Its Shadow Split the World into Quadrants 


Captured by Canadian photographer David Burdeny in 2007, this amazing photo of a tabular iceberg rising straight out of the Weddel Sea appears to organize the world into four neat quadrants. Titled “Mercators Projection,” the photo is from his series “North/South” taken while on tour of Antarctica and Greenland. You can follow Burdeny’s most recent work on Instagram. (via PetaPixel)

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A Virtual Reality Sky Projected Above a Parisian Church by Artist Miguel Chevalier 


Projected onto the ceiling of Saint-Eustache Church in Paris, Voûtes Célestes is a work by Miguel Chevalier that turned the ancient chapel into the backdrop for a constantly morphing sky chart produced in real time. Cycling through 35 different colored networks, the ceiling glowed with each successive pattern, highlighting the grand architecture that laid below the swirling universes above.

The work, accompanied by musical improvisations played by Baptiste-Florian Marle-Ouvrard on the organ, was produced for Nuit Blanche 2016 on the first of October. Visitors to the virtual reality artwork were invited to wander or lie down beneath the false sky above, aesthetically immersed in a wash of sonic and visual splendor.

Chevalier was born in Mexico City in 1959 and has lived in Paris since 1985. His work has focused almost exclusively on the digital since the late 1970s, often combining themes such as nature and artifice. You can see a more of his work on his website, and a video of his Paris installation below. (via designboom)








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Winsor & Newton #InspiredByProMarker Drawing Challenge (Sponsor) 


Wanna win a stockpile of high-quality markers? Winsor & Newton are inviting graphic marker lovers all over the world to participate in their global #InspiredByProMarker drawing challenge. For this new contest, artists are asked to create an artwork based on a template of lines derived from the Winsor & Newton logo using predominantly ProMarkers and/or BrushMarkers.

The challenge winner will receive the full range of ProMarkers and BrushMarkers—that’s 220 high quality markers. Two additional runners-up will be awarded with a marker prize, as will a favorite selected by the public.





The rules for the competition are simple:

    1. Create an original artwork using the lines of the template.

    2. Use mainly Promarkers and/or BrushMarkers for the artwork and upload your completed piece to Instagram using the hashtags #InspiredByPromarker and #WinsorNewtonChallenge.

    3. The challenge runs until midnight (GMT) on October 31st and the winners will be announced on November 30th. So far, over 650 entries have been posted and Winsor & Newton is super excited to see all the new entries still to come.

For full terms and conditions, please visit the contest page. Get drawing, and good luck!

New Anatomical Specimens Made from Hand-Dyed Wool and Silk by Lana Crooks 


Tricking the eye to view textile as bone, Lana Crooks (previously) works with bits of hand-dyed wool and silk to recreate the sun-drenched skeletons of snakes, birds, and humans, displaying them each in bell jars. She considers he works “faux specimens” as her delicate sculptures blend science, art, and fantasy. Often her inspirations come from books as well as real specimens, like the ones found in the back rooms of Chicago’s Field Museum of Natural History.

Crooks curated the group exhibition All That Remains, where her work can also be seen, at the Stranger Factory in Albuquerque, New Mexico. She also has an upcoming two-person exhibition at the Chicago-based Rotofugi titled Night Fall, which opens December 9th, 2016. You can see more of her textile skeletons on her Facebook and Instagram. (via Hi-Fructose)










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Taxidermy Renderings of Dr. Seuss’ Fantastical Beings 


Smiling goofily from their wooden mounts sit the imaginings of Dr. Seuss, animals with bizarre names like the Turtle-Necked Sea-Turtle, Two Horned Douberhannis, and Semi-Normal Green-Lidded Fawn. The beasts were not designed by fanatics of Dr. Seuss’ famous children’s books, but are based on works created by the man himself over 80 years ago, each originating from an obscure collection of paintings, drawings, and sculpture known as The Secret Art of Dr. Seuss Collection.

These particular sculptures are resin casts adapted from Theodor Seuss Geisel’s (aka Dr. Seuss) Collection of Unorthodox Taxidermy. The original works utilized actual remains of lions, rabbits, and deer that died at the Springfield Zoo where his father was a director. Geisel used these ears, antlers, and shells to form realistic copies of his 2D fictional characters and asked his wife Audrey Geisel to wait until after this death to reveal his works to the public. Audrey stayed true to his wish and waited until 1997, six years after his death, to begin commissioning the sculptures.

The 3D doppelgängers, part of a traveling exhibition titled If I Ran the Zoo, each bear a posthumously printed or engraved signature by the late artist, commissioned specifically by the Dr. Seuss Estate. The exhibition of 17 sculptures in their entirety along with rare paintings and drawings will be on view at LaMantia Gallery in Northport, New York from November 12-27, 2016. The exhibition is timed with the release of the Powerless Puffer, the final cast resin sculpture in the series. (via The Creators Project)








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A Levitating Wireless Speaker in the Shape of a Storm Cloud 



Richard Clarkson Studio (previously) has teamed up with Crealev (previously) to produce a miniature floating cloud, one that hovers indoors while both playing your favorite music and lighting up in tune to the beat to replicate a storm. The design, called Making Weather, is formed from polyester fibers which hide a Bluetooth speaker, LED lights, and a magnet. This magnet allows the form to float above the piece’s mirrored base in opposite polarity with another magnet, seeming to organically hover and sway to the music that is pumped through it.

Currently in prototype form, the indoor cloud will be hopefully become available for living room use in the near future. (via My Modern Met)




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