Fragmented Ink Paintings on Arrays of Vintage Books by Ekaterina Panikanova 

Spread across the opened pages of books pinned against the wall like insect specimens, artist Ekaterina Panikanova (previously) creates ink paintings that appear like fragments of memory. As with the content of old books, the subjects of each work appear from a different era, engaged in mysterious activities or moments while accompanied by recurring images of lace, layer cakes, animals, and explosions of ink. Occasionally an image is permitted to span several book spreads, but is often interrupted by a new idea that appears to be inserted like a misplaced puzzle piece.

Panikova was born in Russia and now lives and works between between St. Petersburg and Rome. You can see more of her recent work at Z2O Galleria.

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Gaudí’s First Built House Opens to the Public for the First Time in its 130-Year-Old History 

© Casa Vicens, Barcelona 2017. All images by Pol Viladoms.

Built between 1883 and 1885, Casa Vicens is the very first home designed by Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí. During most of the Barcelona home’s 130-year-old history it served as a private residence, but thanks to a 2014 purchase by MoraBanc and a massive two-year renovation, the 19th-century building will be repurposed as a cultural center opening this October.

Casa Vicens was originally commissioned by the tile manufacturer Manuel Vicens i Montaner as a summer home, but sold in 1899 to the Jover family who owned the house for more than a century. The restoration of Casa Vicens began in April 2015, led by architects José Antonio Martínez Lapeña and Elías Torres, of Martínez Lapeña-Torres Arquitectes, and David García of Daw Office. The new museum will display many of Gaudís original designs while hosting both permanent and rotating exhibitions within its grand interior.

The building itself stands as an early example of the architect’s Neo-Mudéjar architecture, and is one of eight UNESCO World Human Heritage Site in Barcelona. Casa Vicens completes the Gaudí Route, a series of more than a dozen buildings designed by the architect including the breathtaking La Sagrada Familia. (via Dezeen and Hyperallergic)

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World Tree: A Branching River Etched into the Ground by Krisztián Balogh 

World Tree, 2012. Soil, water. 10m (32 ft)

World Tree is a 2012 land art installation by Hungarian artist Krisztián Balogh. Dug into the ground like a network of roots or tree branches, the piece measures nearly 32 feet (10m) across and has the uncanny perfection of a digital rendering, though it’s most certainly a physical artwork. You can see more views on Behance.

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A Giant Bosch-Inspired Watercolor by Illustrator Marija Tiurina 

Marija Tiurina‘s fantastical watercolor painting Eden is her biggest to date, measuring approximately 30 x 10 inches. The scene captures a woman kneeling amongst the inhabitants of a mythological forest, trapped within a busy scene that contains everything from an animated ramen bowl to an eel snaking its way through the center of her torso.

The painting was inspired by the chaos of Hieronymus Bosch‘s The Garden of Earthly Delights, Tiurina creating her own take on the hedonistic 15th century work. You can see more of her illustrations on the artist’s InstagramFacebook, and Behance, as well as a behind-the-scenes look into Eden in the video below.

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Octopi Embedded in Ceramic Vessels by Keiko Masumoto 

Ceramic artist Keiko Masumoto is intensely interested in the intersection of art and craft, whether a craft object can simply be decorative or if an artistic work can still remain functional. Her questions have resulted in a series of traditional ceramic plates, bowls, and vases embedded with unlikely objects from wriggling octopi to entire buildings. You can explore a bit more in her online portfolio and at Spoon & Tamago.

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