Embroidered Haute Couture Box Bugs by Noboru Hoareau 

French embroidery artist Noboru Hoareau recently stitched this fun series of creepy insects, spiders, and arthropods comprised mostly of beads. Each piece is embroidered into fabric and framed, an objects he refers to as a “embroidery haute couture box bug”. You can see much more in his Etsy shop. If you liked these, also check out the work of Humayrah Bint Altaf and Adam Pritchett. (via Lustik)

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A House Encased in Ice on the Shores of Lake Ontario 

All photos courtesy John Kucko.

Last weekend photographer John Kucko received a tip about a house in Webster, New York that had become encased in ice after a winter storm swept through the area. Arriving on the scene he found what you see here, a resident’s summer home swallowed entirely by wind-swept icicles and sheets of ice. Kucko shares with Colossal that the building rests just 20 feet from the rocky shores of Lake Ontario where winds recorded up to 81mph caused the waves to crash against the small home. You can see a few recent video updates on his Facebook page. (via Twisted Sifter)

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New Reusable Adhesive Tape Makes Any Surface Instantly Compatible with LEGO Bricks 

We all know that the world can’t get enough LEGO, but if this handy LEGO tape is any indicator, soon we won’t be able to find enough places to put it. Created by Cape Town-based designers Anine Kirsten and Max Basler, Nimuno Loops are a reusable adhesive tape that turns any surface into a base for LEGO projects. Think: walls, glass windows, ceilings, or irregularly shaped objects can all suddenly become a starting point for building with LEGOs. You can also build around corners, or even slap additional components onto the sides of existing LEGO creations. Nimuno Loops are currently funding on Indiegogo and they’ve raised almost $700,000 as of this writing, handily surpassing their goal by 8,575%. (via Designboom, Creators Project, and basically the rest of the entire internet)

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A Rainbow of Tape Cascades Through a Six-Story Atrium in Sydney 

“A million things that make your head spin,” 2016-2017. Flagging tape, wood, paint, and hardware. 51.4 x 27.5 x 84.8 feet / 15.67 x 8.37 x 25.85 meters

LA-based artist Megan Geckler recently completed work on her latest multi-colored tape installation inside the 6-story atrium of the historic Customs House building in Sydney. The suspended artwork titled “A million things that make your head spin” was produced with 14 kilometers (46,000 feet) of flagging tape with the help of several volunteers. Like a swirling tornado of color, the piece dominates the interior space of the building utilized as a cultural hub located in the city’s Circular Quay area. The installation will be on view through April 30, 2017. You can see more of Geckler’s work in her online portfolio and watch a behind-the-scenes video below.

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Rock Band: An Electromechanical Sound Machine That Makes Music With Rocks 

A rolling stone gathers no moss as they say, but this collection of stones manipulated by electromechanical devices are capable of performing George Harrison’s “Here Comes the Sun” thanks to artist Neil Mendoza. Titled Rock Band, this kinetic sound art installation is actually four different instruments including a xylophone, a buzzing base, two spinners, and a pair of slappers. Mendoza describes how each device works:

Xylophone: Inside each of the tubes is a small pebble. When the Teensy receives a note for this instrument, it triggers a solenoid (electromagnet), to launch the pebble up a tube and strike a key. For the design of this piece, I wrote a piece of software that calculated the size each key needed to be to produce the appropriate frequency and then cut them out using a water jet cutter.

Bass: This is the small marble circle in the front. When the Teensy receives a note for this one, it causes the plunger of a solenoid (electromagnet) to vibrate at the frequency of the appropriate musical note against the rock.

Spinners: These are the two large objects on either side and are percussive. Inside each of these, there are two magnets attached to each end of a shaft. On the outside, there are two magnetic rocks, Hematite, that are attracted to the magnets on the inside. When a note is received, the shaft spins and one of the rocks is guided away from its magnet and launched through the air. It lands on a piece of marble that has been cut to size to fit in the machine.

Slapper: These slap the rocks with pieces of fake leather and provide some light percussion.

All of the machines were built at Autodesk’s Pier 9 workshop in San Francisco as part of their artist in residence program. You can see more of Mendoza’s mechanical works on his website.

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Abstracted Alterations to The New York Times’ Front Pages by Fred Tomaselli 

“Sunday, October 4, 2009” (2016) Acrylic and ink on paper. 72 1/4 x 43 in. (183.5 x 109.2 cm) Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

Since 2005, artist Fred Tomaselli has been altering the front page of The New York Times, highlighting the day’s catastrophes and nightmares with layered collages and detailed paintings. The series, simply titled The Times, focuses on the tactility of newsprint in a hyper-digital society, as well as the absurdity our contemporary political climate.

The displayed works are large-scale reproductions of the paper’s front page, each titled based on the date of which the original newspaper was published. Tomaselli views these artistic interventions as abstract editorials, just another decision made in the production of the news and its byproducts.

Tomaselli’s works will be featured in the solo exhibition Paper at White Cube gallery in London opening March 17. The exhibition will continue through May 13, 2017. (via Creative Boom)

“Wednesday, July 23, 2014” (2016), acrylic and photo collage over archival inkjet print, 43 x 47 1/2 in. (109.2 x 120.7 cm) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

“Wednesday, March 4, 2015” (2016), acrylic, photo collage and leaves over archival inkjet print, 50 3/4 x 81 3/4 in. (128.9 x 207.6 cm) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

“Thursday, May 12, 2011” (2016), acrylic over archival digital print, 43 x 54 in. (109.2 x 137.2 cm), 56 x 67 x 2 in. (142.2 x 170.2 x 5.1 cm) (framed) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

“Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014” (2016), acrylic over archival inkjet print, 43 x 59 3/4 in. (109.2 x 151.8 cm) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

“Thursday, April 2, 2015” (2016), acrylic over archival inkjet print, 72 1/4 x 43 in. (183.5 x 109.2 cm) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

“Bloom (Dec. 17)” (2017), acrylic and ink on paper, 44 x 65 1/2 in. (111.8 x 166.4 cm), 52 3/4 x 74 1/4 x 2 1/2 in. (134 x 188.6 x 6.4 cm) (framed) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

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