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For more information visit us at sva.edu/ce.

Affectionate Murals on the Streets of Italy by Millo

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Italian artist Francesco Camillo Giorgino, known as Millo, paints large-scale murals that feature friendly inhabitants exploring their urban setting. He uses simple black and white lines with dashes of color when necessary, and often incorporates elements of architecture into his multi-story paintings. In 2014, Millo won the B.Art competition that gave him the opportinity to paint no less than 13 large murals in the city of Turin. You can see much more of his work on his website, and on Facebook. (via Doodlers Anonymous)

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New Dreamlike Scenes from Inside JeeYoung Lee’s Tiny Art Studio

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Within the small confines of her 3 x 6 meter studio in Seoul, JeeYoung Lee‘s imagination is without boundaries. For each of her photographs the artist fills every square inch of space with hand-made props, set pieces, and backdrops and never edits or modifies the image digitally post-shoot. We first featured Lee’s work on Colossal last year, and OPIOM Gallery has since shared several more installations spanning from 2008 to 2014. Via OPIOM:

She does so with infinite minutiae and extraordinary patience, in order to exclude any ulterior photographic alteration. Thus materialised, these worlds turn real and concretise; imagination reverts to the tangible and the photo imagery of such fiction testify as to their reality. In the midst of each of these sets stands the artist, those self-portraits however are never frontal, since it is never her visual aspect she shows, but rather her quest for an identity, her desires and her frame of mind. Her creations act as a catharsis which allows her to accept social repression and frustrations.

It should be noted that Lee’s photography seems to be influenced, at least conceptually, by artist Sandy Skoglund. Her latest exhibition titled Stage of Mind will appear in both Bogota and Belfast later this summer. (via My Modern Met)

Update: Lee will also be exhibiting several pieces at Gallery Nine 5 in New York later this week.

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Anatomical Specimens Made from Hand-Dyed Wool and Silk by Lana Crooks

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Wisdom / 11″h x 11″w x 5″d / Hand-dyed wool in Wall-Hanging Shadow Box

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Autumn Hawk / 8″h x 5″w x 5″d / Hand-dyed Wool housed in a Glass Dome

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Still This Heart / 4″h x 4″w x 4″d / Hand-dyed wool under Glass Dome

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Study In Monochrome / 9″h x 5″w x 5″d / Hand-dyed Silk and Wool under Glass Dome

Textile artist Lana Crooks constructs extremely realistic small anatomical specimens from hand-dyed silk and wool. Fascinated by “the antique, the creepy, the cute and the mysterious” Crooks has received numerous accolades for her plush toy designs and is a member of the OhNo!Doom Collective here in Chicago. You can follow her work on Facebook or Instagram and see it in person next month at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco. (via Geyser of Awesome)

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Patience: The ‘Inception’ of Artists’ Books by Randi Parkhurst

Watch as book artist and paper maker Randi Parkhurst slowly unveils her 2007 creation Patience, a meticulously organized collection of some 20+ self-contained handmade paper books. It really pays off to not skip ahead and watch as each inconceivably smaller box is revealed. This must have taken months and months to make. (via Colossal Submissions).

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Macro Photographs of Singapore’s Most Unusual Insects and Arachnids by Nicky Bay

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Cicadae Parasite Beetle (Rhipiceridae)

One of my favorite Flickr accounts to follow is Singapore-based photographer Nicky Bay (previously) who ventures into some of the most ecologically diverse (ie. creepiest and crawliest) places in the world to shoot macro photos of insects, arachnids, and fungi. Bay went on 46 different shooting excursions in 2014 and discovered creatures that seem more at home in an Avatar movie than here on Earth. He’s also begun working more with ultraviolet light that he uses to reveal the natural fluorescence of many organisms he encounters. My favorite discovery while scrolling through Bay’s 2014 photos is this species of moth that builds a cage out of its own caterpillar spines to protect itself while in a pupal stage. You can follow his day-to-day adventures on Facebook.

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Archduke larva (Lexias pardalis dirteana)

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Caterpillar

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Freshly moulted Jumping Spider

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Harvestman illuminated with 365nm wavelength ultraviolet light; Millipede fluorescence.

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Treehopper (Membracidae)

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Cuckoo Bee

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Caged pupa. The spines of the caterpillar were used to construct this magnificent cage for protection during pupation.

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Bioluminescent fungi

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Longhorn beetle

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Huntsman Spider consuming prey exposed under ultraviolet light for 20 seconds.

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Twig Spider

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[An Interpretation of] the Netherlands Coat of Arms Illustrated with Suspended Layers of Cut Paper

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Nearly six months in the making, this superb interpretation of the Netherlands coat of arms was lead by Moldova-based Beauty & the Beast Studio. Illustrator Ivan Belikov rendered the 7-color emblem which was then translated into hundreds of cut fragments that were paintstakingly assembled into multiple levels. This is just a glimpse of the final piece, you can see more plus lots of process photos over on Behance.

Update: Many readers have written in to point out this piece only vaguely represents the actual lion appearing on the Netherlands Coat of Arms. We’ve updated the title to reflect this.

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