Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics
Pair by the sea. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics
Pair by the sea. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics
Pair by the sea. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics
Blue & White porcelain shards flower. No.1, 2014. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics
Blue & White porcelain shards flower. No.1, 2014. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics
Blue & White porcelain shards flower. No.2, 2014.
Porcelain shards, fired clay.

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics
Blue & White porcelain shards flower. No.3, 2014. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics

Israeli artist Zemer Peled explores both the beauty and brutality of nature with sculptures constructed from ceramic shards. The pieces billow and bloom like flowers or sea creatures, taking color from Peled’s use of blue cobalt found in designs and landscapes used in traditional Japanese pottery. The artist uses a slab roller to build sheets of clay which are fired and then smashed to pieces with a hammer, providing a contrast between smooth and soft materials that go into each piece.

Peled was recently shortlisted for the Young Masters Art Prize which opens today Sphinx Fine Art in London, and she’s currently a long term resident at the Archie Bray Foundation. You can see much more of her work in her portfolio.

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Regular Division: A Hypnotic Video Collage Merging Classical Oil Painting and Greenhouses

You can safely file this video titled Regular Division from artist Joe Hamilton under I don’t know what it is but I like it. One way to explain it would be a collaged cinematic journey through ornate botanical gardens … augmented with famous oil paintings. Or something? Intrigued, I reached out to Hamilton and he shares a bit via email:

Regular Division is a collaged video loop that was shot and digitally composed on location in Europe, Asia and the Middle East as part of a new series of works looking at landscape. The series responds to the impact of the digital technologies on our representation of landscape and the effect of this on our relationship with landscape.

Regular Division, the first in this series of works, features a spiral of intermingled scenes filmed from inside a number of green houses and domes. An artificial paradise of foliage under a canopy of gridded glass. The video also features high resolution images of brush strokes taken from classical oil paintings bridging a connection to the traditional medium that has played such an important role in the representation of landscape in the past.

The piece is currently on view at Pablo’s Birthday Gallery in New York as part of the group show ‘Like New Landscape’ curated by Front Company. (via Booooooom)

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A Couple’s Incredible 550,000-Mile Odyssey Through 177 Countries Over 26 Years. In a Single Car.

A Couples Incredible 550,000 Mile Odyssey Through 177 Countries Over 26 Years. In a Single Car. travel

A Couples Incredible 550,000 Mile Odyssey Through 177 Countries Over 26 Years. In a Single Car. travel

A Couples Incredible 550,000 Mile Odyssey Through 177 Countries Over 26 Years. In a Single Car. travel

A Couples Incredible 550,000 Mile Odyssey Through 177 Countries Over 26 Years. In a Single Car. travel

In moments of peak stress, boredom, or desperation for change, we’ve probably all shared the same dream: why not just drop everything and travel. Many are lucky do it for a few months, or even a couple of years, but perhaps no modern travelers have been more ambitious than Gunther and Christine Holtorf, who set out in 1990 on a tour of Africa in a Mercedes Benz G Wagon named ‘Otto,’ and never looked back. Over the next 20 years the trio would rack up almost 550,000 miles (885,139km) across some 177 countries. They never once slept in a hotel, preferring to string up hammocks or sleep inside Otto, a car that required a stockpile of 400 spare parts lashed to the roof for emergency repairs.

Their adventures lead them to encounters with numerous vanishing cultures, extraordinary wildlife, and special permission to drive through both Cuba and even North Korea. There were also tricky political situations, a few minor car wrecks, and no less than five cases of malaria. Christine passed away in 2010, but Gunther, now 76, continued traveling for several more years before recently returning to Berlin.

The video from 2012 above includes some great highlights from the Hortorf’s trek, but what you really need to do is scroll through this new interactive travelogue from the BBC that includes some newly published photos and a full written account of their decades-long adventures. Also, here’s Gunther telling a great story about his close encounter with a hyena. (via PetaPixel)

Update: Here’s a 2013 interview with Gunther from Outside.

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Tom Fruin’s Stained Glass House Installed at Brooklyn Bridge Park

Tom Fruins Stained Glass House Installed at Brooklyn Bridge Park stained glass sculpture New York glass
Axel Taferner

Tom Fruins Stained Glass House Installed at Brooklyn Bridge Park stained glass sculpture New York glass
Shawn Hoke

Tom Fruins Stained Glass House Installed at Brooklyn Bridge Park stained glass sculpture New York glass
Gigi Altarejos

Tom Fruins Stained Glass House Installed at Brooklyn Bridge Park stained glass sculpture New York glass
Gigi Altarejos

Tom Fruins Stained Glass House Installed at Brooklyn Bridge Park stained glass sculpture New York glass
Gigi Altarejos

Tom Fruins Stained Glass House Installed at Brooklyn Bridge Park stained glass sculpture New York glass
DUMBO Arts Festival

Tom Fruins Stained Glass House Installed at Brooklyn Bridge Park stained glass sculpture New York glass
DUMBO Arts Festival

Tom Fruins Stained Glass House Installed at Brooklyn Bridge Park stained glass sculpture New York glass
DUMBO Arts Festival

As part of this year’s DUMBO Arts Festival, sculptor Tom Fruin installed his famous plexiglass house, Kolonihavehus, in Brooklyn Bridge Park. The multi-colored house was lit from inside and temporarily inhabited by performance duo CoreAct who engaged in a collaborative physical performance that is described here by DUMBO:

The colorful glass house is inhabited by two performers, who portray everyday dilemmas and lifestyle paradoxes in a subtle manner. They have lost the ability to meaningfully discriminate, and are trapped in a long chain of procrastination, mirroring our current social patterns.

You might also recognize Fruin’s other renowned sculpture in DUMBO, Watertower. (via My Modern Met)

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Dense Wire Tree Sculptures by Clive Maddison

Dense Wire Tree Sculptures by Clive Maddison wire trees sculpture

Dense Wire Tree Sculptures by Clive Maddison wire trees sculpture

Dense Wire Tree Sculptures by Clive Maddison wire trees sculpture

Dense Wire Tree Sculptures by Clive Maddison wire trees sculpture

Dense Wire Tree Sculptures by Clive Maddison wire trees sculpture

Dense Wire Tree Sculptures by Clive Maddison wire trees sculpture

Dense Wire Tree Sculptures by Clive Maddison wire trees sculpture

Using nothing but wire, sculptor Clive Madison creates tangled trees that grow from wooden bases into dense clusters of leaves and branches. Each piece is made by hand without glue or solder, using single strands of wire that start at the base and terminate at the top. You can see many more pieces on his website, and several are available through Lee Champman Gallery. (via Ghost in the Machine)

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Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by ‘We Make Carpets’

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Exhibition view of “Kneeling: Five years of WE MAKE CARPETS”

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Exhibition view of “Kneeling: Five years of WE MAKE CARPETS”

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Exhibition view of “Kneeling: Five years of WE MAKE CARPETS”

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Skewer Carpet

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Skewer Carpet, detail

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Crayon Carpet (2013) was built from 16,000 colored crayons

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Fork Carpet (2010)

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

detail of Fork Carpet (2010)

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Firework Carpet (2014)

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Pasta Carpet

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Exhibition view of “Kneeling: Five years of WE MAKE CARPETS”

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Disposable Carpet

It’s not hard to imagine what Dutch design trio We Make Carpets, makes. True to their name, Marcia Nolte, Stijn van der Vleuten and Bob Waardenburg create carpets, but not they kind you’re thinking of. Mixing traditional pattern making with a critical view of consumer society, the group creates unusual carpets using everything from crayons and fireworks to cocktail umbrellas, plastic forks and dried pasta. From a distance we simply see a decorative carpet. But upon closer inspection the meticulously assorted collection of dense materials reveal themselves.

We Make Carpets is currently celebrating 5 years and 50 different carpets with an exhibition at mu in Eindhoven. “Kneeling: Five years of WE MAKE CARPETS” is going on through October 26, 2014. You can see much more of these big and small temporary carpets on the artist’s website.

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Food Artist Uses Wax to Make Incredibly Realistic Food Samples in Japan

Food Artist Uses Wax to Make Incredibly Realistic Food Samples in Japan wax food

This food artist in the town of Gujo, Japan demonstrates how to make tempura and other foods using layers of colored wax and other materials. The first part with shrimp tempura is fun, but the realism in the head of lettuce is astounding. Definitely worth a watch all the way through. (via Metafilter)

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