Art

Figures in Silhouette March Across Building Facades in New Murals by David de la Mano

November 27, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Spanish artist David de la Mano (previously) depicts anonymous hordes of soldier-like silhouettes marching to unknown destinations inside a dystopian world. The figures have arms and legs that appear to morph into tree limbs and roots—a reference to displacement—while some appear to have the heads of animals like birds or dogs. His most recent pieces appear to consciously draw connections to the ongoing refugee crisis. The artist is currently in London ahead of an upcoming solo show titled “Adrift” at Hang-Up Pictures. Via Hang-Up:

In a world of those forced to flee, of poverty, of war and violence, David de la Mano paints his haunting figures as shadows looking for their place in the world. All united, they are travelling to a destination unknown. Boats with broken sails and women with animal heads drift without direction but are all linked by an uncertain journey.

Adrift portrays the anonymous epic of travelling on a rough ship, or passing through reinforced wire fences – all characteristics of the current fear of some nations to the refugee invasion. Adrift analyses the timeless concept of migration and group behaviour. It refers to the drifting movement that characterises the migrant’s journey and the determination and strength that grows and develops when your house and your neighbourhood have already been disfigured.

De la Mano is producing a number of new acrylic, coffee, and ink works for the Adrift show, with a portion of proceeds from one edition to be donated to the Refugee Community Kitchen. Seen here are a number of recent murals in London, Germany, and Italy, with additional murals on his blog. (via StreetArtNews)

 

 



Art Illustration Science

The Art and Science of Ernst Haeckel: A Compendium of Colorfully Rendered 19th-Century Biological Illustrations

November 27, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

German biologist and artist Ernst Haeckel dedicated his life studying far flung flora and fauna,  drawing each of their peculiar specificities with an immense scientific detail. Haeckel made hundreds of such renderings during his lifetime, works which were used to explain his biological discoveries to a wide audience. In addition to these visual masterpieces, Haeckel also discovered many microbes, and coined several scientific terms commonly known today, such as ecology, phylum, and stem cell.

A new book from Taschen titled The Art and Science of Ernst Haeckel outlines the 19th-century artist-biologist’s most important visual works and publications across a hefty 704 pages. The compendium includes 450 drawings, watercolors, and sketches from his research, which was in large support of Darwin’s theory of evolution. Most notably the book contains the Kunstformen der Natur (Art Forms in Nature), a collection of 100 prints of varying organisms originally published between 1899 and 1904.

You can learn more about the collection of illustrations and Haeckel’s discoveries on Taschen’s website. (via Fast Co. Design)

 

 



Art Craft

Glass Vases Formed Within Wooden Enclosures by Scott Slagerman Studio

November 27, 2017

Christopher Jobson

To explore the symbiotic relationship between two vastly different materials, LA-based artist Scott Slagerman in a collaboration with Jim Fishman created this elegant Wood & Glass series. Each glass vase is formed by blowing it directly into a shape cut from wood while it lays flat on a table, ensuring the disparate objects fit perfectly like puzzle pieces. For a labor-intensive process that requires a precise dance of speed and movement, the added difficulty of working with a flammable enclosure seems remarkable. From Slagerman’s artist statement:

Scott Slagerman has always been captivated by glass – how it is transformed from a fragile, yet unyielding solid state to molten fluidity and back again; and how this mutable substance, through a process that is both delicate and dangerous, can create objects both essential and esoteric. He is fascinated by the role that glass plays in architecture, as well as in the everyday objects that we find around us.

You can see more from the Glass & Wood series on Slagerman’s website. (via Contemporist)

 

 



Illustration

Cut-Out Ink and Pen Illustrations of London’s Oldest Pubs and Other Landmarks by Maxwell Tilse

November 24, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Traveling illustrator Maxwell Tilse documents his European journeys by creating small drawings of each city he lands in. After two years of living in London, Tilse has released a new series of miniature cut-out illustrations that depict the city’s oldest pubs and other famous landmarks.

The detailed works are merely 5 cm tall, yet capture the diverse architecture found in London’s pubs and other buildings. The Coach & Horses (pictured above) is a freestanding Tudobethan pub. “The pub itself isn’t anything unique,” explains Tilse in an Instagram post about the drawing. “In fact there are over 50 pubs named Coach & Horses in London alone. But I do love the mock Tudor architecture that’s nestled between the Grand Victorian hotels and galleries.”

In each post Tilse provides an historic fact about the provided building, and often describes his relationship to the pub or structure. You can see more of his illustrations documented next to the original building on Instagram, and browse his available works and prints on Etsy. (via ARCHatlas)

 

 



Art Design History

Art Enamel Pins Inspired by the Masters

November 24, 2017

Christopher Jobson

The Pin Museum has a great selection of enamel pins featuring images lifted from iconic paintings and sculptures from Dali to Van Gogh. Their current lineup includes over a dozen different designs, all available in their online shop.

 

 



Craft Food

Garden Vegetable and Plant Embroideries by Veselka Bulkan

November 22, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Embroidery artist Veselka Bulkan (previously) continues to produce carefully embroidered works of root-bound plants found in gardens. The pieces all interact with hoops in various ways, from potted plants and potatoes that dangle from the edge to dandelions that stretch between two hoops. Bulkan has also been taking commissions for a series of ultrasound embroideries, and many of her original pieces are available in her shop.

 

 



Art

Danish Street Art Project Has Built Over 3,500 Urban Bird Houses Since 2006

November 22, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist and designer Thomas Dambo (previously) specializes in building family-friendly installations from upcycled materials. One of Dambo’s many interactive projects is Happy City Birds, a ongoing series that lies at the intersection of street art and community development. The Danish artist builds bird houses across urban centers, installing the new homes against buildings, grouped on tall poles, or spaced throughout existing trees.

Since 2006, Dambo and his crew have constructed more than 3,500 birdhouses with recycled wood and paint. Although a large percentage of his works are concentrated in Arken (you can see a Google map of the bird house locations here), many more of them can be found dotting Copenhagen, Aarhus, Odense, Horsens, Beirut, and Berlin. You can see more of Dambo’s bird houses, including this human-size build, and a collection of camoflauged homes, on Dambo’s website.