Astonishing Views of the Canary Islands Photographed by Lukas Furlan 

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Located off the coast of Morocco, the Canaries are a cluster of volcanic islands that are among Spain’s farthest-flung territories, rich in biodiversity and no shortage of scenic views. Last September, 25-year-old media student Lukas Furlan spent several weeks exploring two of the islands, Tenerife and the much smaller La Gomera, returning with a stunning collection of photos. At a young age Furlan has already amassed an impressive body of landscape photography, most notably several series of images taken at different locations along the Alps. You can see more of his photography on Facebook and Instagram. (via Behance)

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Macro Photographs Composed of Nearly Ten Thousand Images Show the Incredible Detail of Insect Specimens 

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All images provided by Levon Biss

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Commercial photographer Levon Biss typically shoots portraits of world-class athletes—sports players caught in motion. His new series however, catches subjects that have already been paused, insect specimens found at the Oxford Museum of Natural History. The series originally started as a side-project capturing the detail of bugs that his son would catch at home, and is now displayed at the museum in an exhibition titled Microsculpture.

During the course of his selection from the museum’s collection Biss rejected more than 99% of the bugs he came across, only choosing those that were of the right size and color. To capture these subjects in such immense detail, each part of the insect required a completely different lighting setup.

“I will photograph an antenna and light that antenna so it looks as best as it possibly can,” said Biss. “Once I move onto the next section, for example the eye, the lighting will change completely. I work my way across the whole body of the insect until I end up with 30 different sections, each photographed individually.”

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Working in this comprehensive manner required between 8,000 and 10,000 shots for each final image, moving the camera just ten microns (1/7th of the width of a human hair) between each shot. With this volume of imagery, it takes over two weeks for Biss to complete each photograph start to finish.

You can see Microsculpture through October 30th at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History where the images are displayed next to their actual specimens. In case you can’t make it to the UK, you can take a detailed look at all 22 of Biss’s images on his interactive Microsculpture website. (via PetaPixel)

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Okuda San Miguel Transforms the Walls of an Italian Kindergarten Into a Prismatic Fairytale 

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All images provided by Ink and Movement.

Okuda San Miguel (previously here and here) recently visited the Italian town of Arcugnano with his assistant Antonyo Marest to paint five different murals on the walls of the town’s kindergarten. The five murals contain birds, bears, and a winged lion—each radiating a spectrum of colors that seem to animate the mystical creatures. San Miguel was watched closely by an audience of the kindergarten’s students as he completed the murals, each work inspired by positivity, love, freedom, and nature. You can see this and other works on the artist’s Instagram.

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A Breathtaking Quilled Paper Carpet and Gospel Book Cover by Lisa Nilsson 

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Jardin, 2016. Japanese mulberry paper, gilt edged paper. 27.5″ x 34.25″ x 2.5″

Working with compact rolls of Japanese mulberry paper in a myriad of colors, artist Lisa Nilsson painstakingly creates anatomical figures and textile patterns using a centuries-old technique called quilling. In her latest artworks Jardine and Gospel, Nilsson was inspired by the patterns of an Islamic carpet and an 8th century gospel cover. The carpet piece alone was nearly 8 months in the making as she created ornate figures of flowers, stars, and other patterns to fill a 27″ by 34″ inch frame, much of which was improvised as she worked outward from the center. For Gospel she in incorporated bright gilt edged paper to mimic the actual gold used for traditional religious book covers.

You can see more views of these artworks on Nilsson’s website, and she was recently intereviewed about the new pieces on All Things Paper.

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Jardin, detail.

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Jardin, detail.

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Jardin, detail.

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Jardin, detail.

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Jardin, detail.

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Gospel, 2016. Japanese mulberry paper, gilt edged paper. 19 3/8″ x 22 3/8″ x 2 3/8″

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Gospel, detail.

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Gospel, detail.

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Gospel, detail.

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Photographic Images That Weave Moments in Time by Jason Chen 

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Detail of “K,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75, all images via Paradigm Gallery + Studio, Philadelphia

Moving beyond traditionally static methods of portraiture, Jason Chen creates movement through the weaving of multiple images into one. Chen’s works use separate images of the same subject to explore mutation and time, offering a more fluid peek into his subject’s emotional state. When glanced at from afar the images appear quite singular, but when zoomed in the disparate details of the images stand out—multiple eyes occupying the same face like seen in Chen’s haunting G-iii.

This is a relatively new method for the Philadelphia-based photographer who had been previously focused on dry plate tintypes. Chen is the co-founder of Paradigm Gallery + Studio where he is currently included in the group exhibition “Portrait”  through June 18th. (via Hi Fructose)

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“K,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75

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“Ian” (2016), archival pigment print, hand cut and woven, 24”h x 36”w

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“Jessica” (2016), archival pigment print, hand cut and woven, 24”h x 36” w

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Detail of “Jessica” (2016), archival pigment print, hand cut and woven, 24”h x 36” w

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“C,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 9in x 11in

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“G-iii,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75

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Detail of “G-iii,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75

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“G-ii,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 20.5in x 20.5in

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Edouard Martinet’s Masterfully Sculpted Animals and Insects Made from Bicycle, Car, and Motorcycle Parts 

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Robin. Bronze, one of an edition of 12 copies, 22 x 32 x 18 cm. LEGS: springs , pieces of costume jewellery; BODY: children’s tricycle fender; FEATHERS: hood ornament of a Citroen; WINGS: petrol tank plates of a 50s motorcycle Monet-Goyon, bike chain guards; TAIL: car part, motorcycle decoration; EYES: marbles; HEAD: two seed scoops, ornaments for bike lights; BEAK: autoscope part, bike ornament.

French artist Edouard Martinet assembles faithful interpretations of birds, crustaceans, insects, and other creatures with countless objects from discarded bicycles, cars, and household objects. A bicycle pump forms the abdomen of a dragonfly, windshield wipers serve as the legs of a fly, or the metal logos of a bicycle manufacturer are layered to create the dense scales of a fish. All the more incredible considering Martinet never welds or solders his pieces, but instead uses only screws or fasteners, selecting only the perfect components that “fit” each assemblage like a puzzle. From Sladmore Contemporary:

What sets Martinet’s work apart is the brilliant formal clarity of his sculptures, and their extraordinary elegance of articulation. His degree of virtuosity is unique: he does not solder or weld parts. His sculptures are screwed together. This gives his forms an extra level of visual richness – but not in a way that merely conveys the dry precision of, say, a watchmaker. There is an X-Factor here, a graceful wit, a re-imagining of the obvious in which a beautifully finished object glows not with perfection, but with character, with new life.

Martinet will open a new exhibition of work at Sladmore Contemporary in London starting May 5th, 2016.

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Dragonfly, 115 x 54 x 80 cm. ABDOMEN: bicycle pump; THORAX: four bike rear lights, two small car lights, big upholstery tacks , gas cap, ball furniture casters; HEAD: two old bike headlights, inside round sunglasses, shoe tree parts, parts of a daisy wheel for typewriter (hair from the mouth), under the head parts of acetylene bike lights; LEGS: tubes, bike cable guide, wing nuts, cream chargers; WINGS: umbrella ribs, fencing wire, aluminium metal mesh.

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Dragonfly, detail.

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Fly, 47 x 40 x 27 cm. LEGS : windshield wiper arms, bike brakes, bike chains, small typewriter parts; HEAD: motor vehicle rear light; PROBOSCIS: car hood hinge; ANTENNAE: ski boot fasteners; THORAX: motorbike headlight; On the top : 50’s kitchen utensil. WINGS: the glass is set in a windscreen brush holder, the wing ribs are made with soldering wire; ABDOMEN: motorbike headlight, part of ceiling lamp.

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Fly, detail.

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Toad

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Sardine, 25 x 70 x 11 cm. BODY: Moped chain guard covered with multiple bicycle logo badges; HEAD: Solex front fenders, car bumpers. EYES: Flashlights; GILLS: Car door parts, bicycle chain guards. TAIL: Motorbike exhaust pipe; FINS: Cake tins.

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Sardine, detail.

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Black Swift, 45 x 20 x 17 cm. LEGS: springs, pieces of costume jewellery; BODY: silver sauce jug; WINGS and FEATHERS: petrol tank plates of a 50s Villier motorcycle, bike chain guards, scooter decoration; TAIL: car decoration; EYES: metal balls; HEAD: one seed scoop, bike headlight; BEAK: dental forceps.

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Black Swift, detail.

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Praying Mantis, 104 x 50 x 74 cm. ABDOMEN: bike fender, car ventilator and ski boots fasteners; WINGS: rear lights of a Peugeot 404; HEAD: two moped indicators; TOP FORELEGS: car mirror handles, ham slicers, nutcracker handles, spaghetti tongs; FOR ALL THE LEGS: the ends are parts from bike brakes plus a bit of bike chain; THE OTHER LEGS: windshield wiper arms, aluminium tubes; THORAX: car bumper, car mirror handles.

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