Design Photography

A Half Century of Bowling Alley Design in Southern Germany Captured by Robert Götzfried

October 10, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

German photographer Robert Götzfried (previously) seeks out unique architecture for series that focus on one particular element of a culture or place. Previous projects have documented the pipe organs of 20 German Catholic churches, observed the creative construction of Cambodia’s roadside barber shops, and captured abandoned storefronts that exist across Australia.

For the last few years Götzfried has focused on photographing the design of bowling alleys and “Kegelbahnen” across Southern Germany, most of which exist from the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s. Kegeln is a German sport similar to bowling, however with smaller balls, only nine pins, and shortened lanes. The sport has fallen from popularity, and many of the photographed lanes’ quality has diminished with the times. You can see a larger selection of Götzfried’s photographic projects on his websiteInstagram, and Behance. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Art

Collaborative Acrylic Paintings That Aim to Visually Map the Perceptual Experiences of Synesthesia

October 9, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

American artist and filmmaker Lucy Engelman has a far different experience of the world than most. Engelman has a phenomenon called Synesthesia, which crosses her perceptual pathways to allow her to taste colors, smell sounds, and even experience verbal data as a spectrum of vibrant colors. Engelman’s husband, Scottish painter Daniel Mullen, decided to translate her complex sensory world in a way that might be easier to understand for those of us who don’t see days and numbers as pockets of color.

The collaboration exists as a set of paintings titled A Different Kind of Time: Sequencing Spatial Temporal Synesthesia. The works each contain a sequence of flat rectangular shapes arranged in a variety of arches and lines. The angle of the shapes is switched in each work, some aligned with only one side facing the audience, while others seem to project right through the canvas or retreat back into the painting’s rotated plane. Engelman explains the works are the closest visual approximation to what she experiences, especially in relation to her mind’s translation of letters, numbers, and time.

You can view more of the paintings based on Engelman’s unique view of the world on Daniel Mullen’s website. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Crafts Photography

New Paper Cutouts by ‘Paperboyo’ Turn Landmarks Across the Globe Into Scenes of Temporary Amusement

October 9, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

London-based photographer Rich McCor, or paperboyo (previously) travels across the globe giving creative updates to buildings, bridges, and signs through the use of simple paper cutouts. By placing a black design in the foreground of his image, London’s Tower Bridge is instantly transformed into a looping roller coaster, and a Canadian building miraculously appears like a lengthy accordion. Although many of McCor’s pictures engage with architectural elements, the paper artist also makes use of the natural environment as a creative backdrop for his paper works. Recently he published a book based on his cutout journeys, titled Around the World in Cut-Outs. You can see more of his photographic collages on Instagram.

 

 



Crafts

Incredibly Lifelike Insects Crafted out of Bamboo by Noriyuki Saitoh

October 7, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Capturing anatomical essences with uncanny skill, Japanese artist Noriyuki Saitoh constructs life-sized insects using bamboo. The natural material’s versatility lends a surprisingly wide range of colors and textures to each creature. And although the first impression is of insects that are ready to crawl or fly off the page, Saitoh engages a thoughtful process of paring down each bug to its essential forms that give the impression of life.

As the artist writes on his website, “Since we are not preparing specimens and replicas, we strictly measure the [overall] dimensions and prioritize the appearance, impressions, features, and senses rather than proportions being created exactly…reality as a work is born if you thin out the elements and leave room to imagine.”

Saitoh is active on Twitter and Facebook where you can follow more of his creations and see works in progress. (via Lustik)

 

 



Photography

Snow Covered Vending Machines Illuminate a Frozen Hokkaido

October 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

There are over five and a half million vending machines across Japan which sell a variety of merchandise from soda and cigarettes, to fresh eggs and flowers. These machines are not only scattered within the large city centers of the country, but also are common sights in smaller, more rural towns. The beverage dispensers are functional all night, serving as main a light source in remote areas without prevalent night life or street lamps.

Many vending machines populate the country’s prefecture of Hokkaido, a northern island that experiences harsh winters. Photographer Eiji Ohashi noticed how the light from these vending machines would illuminate surrounding snow, precipitation that had either piled on top of the machine or buried it completely. These glowing subjects became a source of intrigue for Ohashi who has created a series based on the machines titled Time to Shine.

“As dusk approaches, roadside vending machines light up in cities and in the outskirts,” says Ohashi in a statement. “These scenes of vending machines, ordinarily standing on the roadside, are particular to Japan. The vending machines downtown or in the wilderness, placed to stand in solitude, are an image of loneliness. They work tirelessly, whether it is day or night. But once their sales drop, they are taken away. If they do not glow and shine, they will stop existing. There might be something human about them.”

Ohashi compiled several of the images from his series into a photobook titled Roadside Lights. You can see other images from a snow-covered Hokkaido on his website. (via Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Design

This Resin and Fiberglass Table by Harow Replicates the Surface of the Moon

October 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski


Using digital files pulled from NASA’s archives, French design studio Harow designed a table that replicates the real topology of the moon’s surface. The Apollo 11 Table features a sculpted fiberglass slab in the form of a lunar crater. Covering this thick segment is a layer of resin, which allows one to fully view its dips and crevices while providing coverage to the uneven terrain. The brass and aluminum alloy feet also pay homage to the many Apollo missions, parts that put a modern spin on the Lunar Excursion Module‘s original landing pads.

You can view more of Harow’s designs, including these Apollo landing wall works, on their website and Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Art Illustration

Graphite Illustrations That Explore the Detailed Relationships of the Natural World by Zoe Keller

October 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Zoe Keller creates detailed illustrations pulled from the natural world. Her fauna-based drawings are done completely in charcoal, drawing the eye to the subtle markings used to create either fur or scales. Source imagery for the works comes from nature and how it becomes mediated in books and field guides, however Keller often fills in areas of question with pieces pulled from her own inquisitions or memory.

“My curiosity about the natural world is what keeps me dialed in to my work,” Keller told Colossal. “Drawing is the best way that I’ve found to understand how organisms and ecosystems work. In order to draw something realistically you have to understand how it sits in space, how it moves, the mechanics of its insides. So for me tuning into the natural world means chasing an endless series of questions. On the most minute, piece-specific scale, this can mean asking how many whorls are in the shell of a particular species of snail. On a larger scale, I’ve been developing bodies of work that ask big questions about visually engaging with the natural world in ways that honor it and inspire others to protect it.”

Often the Portland-based artist’s subjects are related in a way that might not be known to the common viewer. This can range from a drawing of plants that are endangered in Oregon to a work concentrated on flowers that can only be found in a particular part of the US. This strategy allows a deeper research to go into her practice so that the final image is not just about aesthetics, but relates to a more immediate concern for the natural world.

Keller recently participated in a week-long backpacking artist residency called Signal Fire in the Klamath National Forest which was one of many inspirations for her upcoming solo exhibition Swarm, opening October 27 at Light Grey Art Lab in Minneapolis. You can peek further into Keller’s practice on her Instagram and Facebook. (via Hi-Fructose) 

 

 

 

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