Blooms 2: Extraordinary New Strobe-Animated Sculptures by John Edmark 

As artist John Edmark's sculptures wiggle, wobble, and twist before your eyes like some alien creature, it’s hard to believe that what you’re seeing is a real physical object—but we assure you it is, with a bit of trick photography and some heady mathematics thrown in for good measure. Blooms 2 (a year in the making) is the latest collection of wild strobe-animated sculptures that begin life as computer programs written in Python before being 3D printed and set in motion on a table, but the patterns you see are created, in a sense, by nature itself.

“Blooms are based on the same geometry nature uses in many plant forms, including artichokes, sunflowers, and pinecones, all of which share the same underlying mathematical pattern,” Edmark shares with Colossal. He explains in more detail how each sculpture is designed:

Blooms are 3-D printed sculptures designed to animate when spun under a strobe light. Unlike a 3D zoetrope, which animates a sequence of small changes to objects, a bloom animates as a single self-contained sculpture. The bloom’s animation effect is achieved by progressive rotations of the golden ratio, phi (ϕ), the same ratio that nature employs to generate the spiral patterns we see in pinecones and sunflowers. The rotational speed and strobe rate of the bloom are synchronized so that one flash occurs every time the bloom turns 137.5º (the angular version of phi).

While the strobe is necessary to witness the animation when viewing these pieces in person, for the sake of creating this video filmmaker Charlie Nordstrom set the camera to a short shutter speed that freezes individual “frames” of the spinning sculpture.

Many of Edmark’s pieces are now in galleries and permanent museum collections around the world. You can see several of his sculptures right now at the Exploratorium in San Francisco and the Technorama in Winterthur, Switzerland. You can also see some of his first designs in his original Blooms video, and for what it’s worth, we also carry his amazing Helicone sculpture in the Colossal Shop.

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Hyperrealistic Oil Paintings of Vivid Chrome Masks by Kip Omolade 

Diovadiova Chrome Kitty Cash I, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

Brooklyn-based artist Kip Omolade creates large-scale oil paintings of chrome masks, depicting not only the subtle details of female faces, but incorporating the reflected environment of each piece. The series, entitled Diovadiova Chrome, makes reference in part to historical African sculptures, while exploring contemporary aspects of identity, luxury, and immortality. Each piece begins as a mold and cast taken from an actual model which is then utilized as source material for Omolade’s towering paintings which can measure several feet tall.

Diovadiova Chrome portraits historically connect to ancient, realistic African sculptures such as Benin ivory masks and Ife bronze heads,” shares Omolade in his artist statement. “The oil paintings are psychological studies that investigate immortality, the universal masks we all wear and contemporary notions of beauty and luxury. The labor-intensive process involves making a mold and cast of each model’s face, reworking the cast plaster sculpture, producing a version in resin and adding a chrome layer with artificial eyelashes. The final sculpture then serves as a model for the hyper-realistic oil painting. This technique maintains the likeness qualities of portraiture while re-presenting a mask that serves as a conduit between the spiritual and natural world.”

The term Omolade uses to describe the series, Diovadiova, is a word he derived from a combination of the Italian word “Dio” meaning god, and the historical meaning of the word “diva” which is goddess.

Omolade first began his art career working as a graffiti artist while interning at Marvel Comics and The Center for African Art and went on to earn a BFA from the School of Visual Arts. His work was most recently included in the Re:Semblance exhibition at the Redbull House of Art in Detroit and last year’s FREAK OUT! show at Zhou B Art Center. You can follow more of his work on Instagram. (via Creator’s Project)

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn IV, Oil on canvas, 24 x 36 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn I, Oil on canvas, 36 x 48 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Kitty Cash IV, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Kitty Cash II, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn V, Oil on canvas, 12 x 16 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn III, Oil on canvas, 36 x 48 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Joyce II, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

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Sky-High Images of Los Angeles at Dusk and Dawn by Dylan Schwartz 

Creative Director and photographer Dylan Schwartz‘s point-of-view is high above the cities he photographs, capturing the bridges, sports complexes, and tips of high rises from the cockpit of a helicopter. Most of Schwartz’s images feature his hometown of LA as the subject, showcasing views from Hollywood to Chinatown during the hazy moments right before dusk and dawn.

Schwartz’s sky-high images of LA will be exhibited next week at PHOTOLA with artbarltd from January 12 through 15. You can see more of his work on his Instagram and website.

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Discover a New Kind of Network at Parsons School of Design (Sponsored) 

What happens when interior designers collaborate with urban planners, when musicians take inspiration from psychologists, or when screenwriters debate with data analysts?

At The New School Open Campus – our unique approach to continuing education – puts students at the heart of university life, creating a collaborative and cross-disciplinary network like no other. Whether you’re taking a short course in the Business of Design on campus in New York City, or studying on our online learning hub, you’ll interact with people who think uniquely, but share your progressive outlook and desire to make a positive impact.

Explore certificates in Fashion Design and Business, Graphic, Digital, and Interior Design at Parsons School of Design, and discover a new kind of network that extends far beyond the classroom.

Visit us on January 12th at 6pm for an info session on Art & Design Courses & Certificates with Parsons. RSVP today.

Artist Walead Beshty Shipped Glass Boxes Inside FedEx Boxes to Produce Shattered Sculptures 

FedEx® Large Box ©2005 FEDEX 139751 REV 10/05 SSCC, Priority Overnight, Los Angeles-New York trk#795506878000, November 27-28, 2007

In this intriguing sculptural series spanning 2005 to 2014, LA-based artist Walead Beshty packaged his artworks in FedEx boxes and shipped them across the country to exhibitions and galleries. But unlike most artists who utilize every bit of care to protect and pad their artwork from the inevitable rough handling of mail carriers, Beshty designed his pieces to break. For his famous FedEx works he constructed laminate glass objects that fit seamlessly within the dimensions of standard size shipping boxes. Through the “normal” handling the objects would inevitably crack and shatter and it was up to curators and gallerists to carefully remove each piece for display. The fragile volumes were then given titles that specifically mention the date, tracking number, and box size of shipment.

Not only was Beshty fascinated by obtaining a “fingerprint” of sorts that documented the journey of each package to its destination, but he also found it curious that a corporation has the ability to copyright the exact dimensions of a box, essentially owning an empty shape. He shares in a 2011 interview with Mikkel Carl:

The FedEx works […] initially interested me because they’re defined by a corporate entity in legal terms. There’s a copyright designating the design of each FedEx box, but there’s also the corporate ownership over that very shape. It’s a proprietary volume of space, distinct from the design of the box, which is identified through what’s called a SSCC #, a Serial Shipping Container Code. I considered this volume as my starting point; the
perversity of a corporation owning a shape—not just the design of the object—and
also the fact that the volume is actually separate from the box. They’re owned
independently from one another.

Furthermore, I was interested in how art objects acquire meaning through their context and through travel, what Buren called, something like, “the unbearable compromise of the portable work of art”. So, I wanted to make a work that was specifically organized around its traffic, becoming materially manifest through its movement from one place to another.

Here’s a brief video of Beshty explaining the project during the 2008 Whitney Biennial. (via BoingBoing)

Fedex, 2005.

Image courtesy Arts on 5

FedEx boxes (various), 2008. Installation view, Signs of the Time, The Whitney Museum of American Art.

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A Quarter Mile of Reflective Poles Mirror the Changing Tides 

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

A quarter mile installation of nearly 250 mirrored posts stood tall on California’s Laguna Beach coast, the work reflecting back the Pacific Ocean’s subtle changes for four days last November. 1/4 Mile Arc is the latest outdoor work by Phillip K Smith III, the Los Angeles born artist who previously built a reflective cabin within Joshua Tree’s expansive desert plains. 1/4 Mile Arc’s 10-foot poles were positioned to specifically mark the curve of the beach just beyond the high tide line, ensuring the work would reflect the waves it faced rather than being swallowed by their force.

The work was commissioned by the Laguna Art Museum for the fourth annual Art & Nature program from the 3rd to 6th of last November. You can watch Smith’s installation against the changing tides in a video by photographer Lance Gerber below. (via Dezeen)

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Eric Stoner, courtesy of Laguna Art Museum

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