Faig Ahmed Creates Glitched-Out Contemporary Rugs from Traditional Azerbaijani Textiles 


Faig Ahmed distorts the patterns of traditional Azerbaijani rugs, dimantling their structure in order to build compositions that trick the eye by appearing to melt off the wall. By rearticulating the original design, he creates contemporary sculptural forms that look like digital glitches, patterns flatlining halfway through a tapestry or gradually morphing into a digital mosaic.

Ahmed explains that his fascination for textiles stems from their historical value, humanity utilizing fabric for nearly the entire length of human history. “Another thing that interests me is pattern,” says Ahmed. “Patterns and ornaments can be found in all cultures, sometimes similar, sometimes very different. I consider them words and phrases that can be read and translated to a language we understand.”

Ahmed lives and works in Baku, Azerbaijan and graduated from the sculpture department of Azerbaijan State Academy of Fine Art in 2004. The artist previously focused on painting, video, and installation, but now currently focuses on textile and sculpture. Ahmed recently had a solo exhibition with Italian gallery Montoro12 titled “Omnia Mutantur, Nihil Interit,” and is currently in the group exhibition “Crafted: Objects in Flux” at The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston until January 10, 2016. (via Booooooom)









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The Smithsonian’s ‘Wonder’ Exhibition Fills a Newly Renovated Gallery Floor-to-Ceiling with Artworks 

Renwick Wonder

Gabriel Dawe, “Plexus A1” (2015)


Patrick Dougherty, “Shindig” (2015)

WONDER, the first exhibition at the Renwick Gallery at the Smithsonian American Art Museum since its two-year renovation, brings together nine contemporary artists that each created room-sized installations inspired by the building in which they were produced. Jennifer Angus, Chakaia Booker, Gabriel Dawe, Tara Donovan, Patrick Dougherty, Janet Echelman, John Grade, Maya Lin, and Leo Villareal each work with objects that are often considered mundane, producing large-scale works from everyday objects like toothpicks and hoards of marbles. Each work in the exhibition demonstrates the labor that went into each piece, normalized elements that have been transformed into mind-bending arrangements.

John Grade created a plaster cast of a tree the same age as the Renwick building, rebuilding the tree’s form from 500,000 segments of reclaimed cedar. Tara Donovan also utilized wood in the form of toothpicks to build her mountainous works, building her towering heaps with other trash like straws and Styrofoam cups to prompt the audience to reexamine the daily detritus seen on city streets.

Other works like Gabriel Dawe’s “Plexus A1” and Janet Echelman’s “1.8” are much more colorful, Dawe’s rainbow weaving mistaken for a prismatic stream of light and Echelman’s red and orange sculptural waves brightly expressing the energetic power of one of the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history.

The Renwick Gallery was the very first building in the United States to be built specifically for the purpose of housing an art museum. You can see how WONDER transformed its newly renovated galleries through mid-2016, with a closing on July 10. (via Art Ruby)

Tara Donovan Renwick Wonder

Tara Donovan, “Untitled” detail (2014)

Tara Donovan Renwick Wonder

Tara Donovan, “Untitled” (2014)

Renwick Wonder

Leo Villareal, “Volume (Renwick)” (2015)


Maya Lin, “Folding the Chesapeake” (2015)

Chakaia Booker Renwick Wonder

Chakaia Booker, “ANONYMOUS DONOR” (2015)

Jennifer Angus Renwick Wonder

Jennifer Angus, “In the Midnight Garden” (2015)

Renwick Stairwell Carpet

Janet Echelman, “1.8” (2015)

Renwick Wonder

Janet Echelman, “1.8” detail (2015)

John Grade Renwick Wonder

John Grade, “Middle Fork” (2015), all images by Ron Blunt


John Grade, “Middle Fork” detail (2015)

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A Gargantuan Octopus Rendered with Discarded Ballpoint Pens by Ray Cicin 


Inspired in part by his graphic-designer friends disparaging comments about the lowly ballpoint pen, artist Ray Cicin took it upon himself to collect all their discarded pens and embarked on this drawing of a mammoth octopus. The piece is inspired by German naturalist Ernst Haeckel’s famous illustration of squid and octopi, and is part of Cicin’s ongoing Deep Blue series. You can follow more of his work on Instagram.


Deep Blue, Octopus. Ballpoint pen on archival Bee Rag paper, 62 x 64 inches




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Sponsor // Build Your Website with Jigsaw, an Easy-to-Use Landing Page Kit 


Creating or redesigning a website often seems to take more time than it’s worth. But the Jigsaw Landing Page Kit from ZippyPixels, offered by Mighty Deals, allows users to craft a unique, personalized website in almost no time at all. Sporting more than 100 high-quality website components, the Landing Page Kit utilizes a simple drag-and-drop tool to help users stitch together their design quickly and precisely. Jigsaw also features 30 ready-to-go website templates, for use as a model or even simple inspiration.

Built using Bootstrap 3 and featuring retina-ready elements, Jigsaw has a clean, crisp, and responsive design. Jigsaw’s resources include 17 different components categories: Headers, Email Signups, Sliders, Image Gallery, Stats, Blogs, Contact, Price Tables, and more. Each of these web components has likewise been optimized for mobile, and has been tested across Google Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Internet Explorer, proving in each instance to function smoothly. Visit Mighty Deals to try the Jigsaw Landing Page Kit for your website today!

Fantastic Folds: Superb Paper Origami Creations by Gonzalo Calvo 

Designed by Gen Hagiwara

Madrid-based origami enthusiast Gonzalo García Calvo has a knack for fiddling with paper. He uses a variety of different techniques and papers to fold impressive animals, objects, and sci-fi figures designed by a number of top origami artists. By day Gonzalo works professionally as a musician but easily gets lost in the challenge of bringing paper to life in his spare time. Seen here is a collection of my favorites, but you can scroll through Flickr to see more. All photos courtesy the artist. (via Demilked)


Designed by Nguyen Hung Cuong

Designed by Artur Biernacki

Origami Dancing Crane designed by Robert Lang and folded from one square of Unryu paper 40×40 cm

Designed by Satoshi Kamiya

Designed by Katsuta Kyohei

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Kelly Reemtsen’s Painterly Juxtapositions of Chic Dresses and Power Tools Showcase Modern Femininity 

Labor-Force (1)

Labor Force, 2015

Los Angeles-based painter Kelly Reemtsen's newest works focus on the subject matter of well-dressed women toting household tools that range from mallets to power saws, each held in a causal position that demonstrates a comfortableness with the object in-hand. Each figure is anonymous, the head of the woman not included in the cropped images of dress, heels, and tool.

The collective works question what makes the modern woman, flouncy dresses coordinating with more masculine tools to showcase the objects’ relatability rather than create a contrast between the woman and her wrenches and shears. The brightly colored impasto paintings each provide a burst of color—yellow, greens, and pinks catching the eye.

Reemtsen just closed a new exhibition of work titled “Smashing” at De Buck Gallery in New York and is also represented by David Klein Gallery, which relocated to Detroit this fall. Her 2013 book “I’m Falling” won both the Independent Spirit Award and 2014 Independent Publisher Books Award.


Unstuck, 2015


Shear Bliss, 2015


Spotted, 2015


Forced, 2015


Handled, 2015

I Pick You, 2015

I Pick You, 2015


Striking Distance, 2015

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A New Japanese Painting Supply Store Lines its Walls With 4,200 Different Pigments 


Thousands of pigments fill glass vials below the slatted wood ceilings of the new concept Pigment, an art supply laboratory and store that just opened in Tokyo by company Warehouse TERRADA. The store design was created by architect Kengo Kuma, utilizing bamboo and large open spaces to create a sense of unity with the outdoors and spark the imagination of those who enter.

In recent years fewer artists have turned to more traditional methods of art making, diminishing the number of successors to these older forms. Pigment aims to provide hard-to-find tools for the preservation of older paintings while also inspiring the latest generation of artists to incorporate these older materials into newer works. In addition to selling brushes, pigments, special glues, and papers (some used in Japanese painting since the Meiji period), the store will also provide workshops by both art professors and manufacturers of the supplies housed in-store.

If you can’t make it to Japan to experience the space in person, you can browse Pigment’s large supply of pigments and rare materials on their online store here. (via Designboom)








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