New in the Colossal Shop: The 1,000 Color Puzzle & Yoga Joes

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Just a quick note that two of our favorite toys ever featured here on Colossal are now available in the Colossal Shop! Clemens Habicht’s amazing 1,000 Colors Puzzle just arrived from Australia, and Dan Abramson’s hilarious Yoga Joes have been successfully produced after a successful Kickstarter boost. We have tons of other quirky new things too numerous to mention, see more here.

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Ceramic Tile Illusion Painted on a Boring Electrical Box in Lisbon

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Illustrator and street artist Diogo Machado (aka Add Fuel) transformed this plain looking electrical box on the streets of Lisbon into a surprising illusion by making it look like a cracked exterior is revealing a blue tile interior. The piece is an extension of Fuel’s ongoing Street Ceramic work, where modern interpretations of tile patterns are installed onto building facades. You can see more views of this piece on StreetArtNews.

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Two Vividly-Marked Peacock Spider Species Nicknamed “Sparklemuffin” and “Skeletorus” Discovered in Queensland

© Jürgen Otto

© Jürgen Otto

© Jürgen Otto

© Jürgen Otto

© Jürgen Otto

© Jürgen Otto

Two new species of peacock spiders have been discovered in southeast Queensland, Australia—one appearing with vivid reds and blues while the other’s details exist in stark black and white. Peacock spiders, named after their bright patterns and dancelike courtship, measure in at just under 0.3 inches. Madeline Girard, a graduate student at UC Berkeley, discovered the two species while in the field, nicknaming the brightly colored spider “Sparklemuffin” and the other “Skeletorus” after its bonelike pattern.

Jürgen Otto, an entomologist who specializes in photographing the arachnids said Skeletorus, officially named Maratus sceletus, is completely different than any peacock spider previously discovered. “Despite the large number of species we have discovered just in the last few years, I can’t help feeling that we may have just scratched the surface of this most exciting group of spiders, and that nature has quite a few more surprises in store,” Otto told Live Science. You can read more in depth about these colorful arachnids in Live Science’s article here. (via My Modern Met)

Detailed Colored Pencil Drawings of Flora and Fauna by Marco Mazzoni

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For most of us, a sketchbook is a playground of ideas, random thoughts, and plenty of mistakes. For Milan-based artist Marco Mazzoni it’s a place where new artworks are born, realized to perfection from margin to margin. In his colored pencil drawings Mazzoni tends to focus on dense arrays of intertwined flora and fauna, as well as depictions of female herbalists from 16th—18th Century, Sardinia—portraits that can be viewed as equally beautiful or unsettling.

Seen here are a number of drawings for the past few months, some of which were created for Juxtapoz Magazine’s 20 Years Under the Influence of Juxtapoz at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery through April 19th. You can follow his work on Instagram, Facebook, and on Tumblr.

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The ‘Analog Memory Desk’ Has a Built-in Scrolling Paper Surface for Recording 1,100 Yards of Sketches and Ideas

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Driven by an obsession of how people record and recall memories, MCAD student Kirsten Camara designed the Analog Memory Desk, what could be the ultimate sketching surface. The desk has a built-in mechanism for scrolling 1,100 yards of butcher paper on rolls embedded in its legs, a sort of tablecloth of memory that records months or even years of random ideas, doodles, and coffee rings. The desk isn’t available for purchase, instead Camara released detailed blueprints through a Creative Commons license so you can build your own. (via Design Milk)

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Hand-Painted Ceramic Bowls Filled with Detailed Hippos, Foxes and Deer

Animal Bowls, 2004, Hella Jongerius for Nymphenburg © Nymphenburg

These animal-filled porcelain bowls were meticulously crafted by hand and designed by Hella Jongerius for a commission by Nymphenburg, a Bavarian porcelain manufacture since the mid-18th century. The series was produced as a celebration of the animal collection found in their archives, and incorporates 3D creatures within the simple glazed bowls.

The ceramics display animals that look as if they have been temporarily and calmly placed upon the delicate bowls—curious foxes, birds, and miniature hippos happily plopped into their fragile environments. The displays are also hand painted with floral decorative patterns originally found on Nymphenburg’s cups and saucers, adding subtle detail to the glossed ceramic works. (via Jongeriuslab)

animal_bowls_fox©Nymphenburg

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Fictional Images of the Universe Made From Scanning Household Items and Food by Navid Baraty

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Planet – bottom of a glass containing half and half, water, food coloring. Moons – bottom of a glass containing coconut milk, water, food coloring. Stars – salt, cinnamon, baking powder, tums

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Black hole – bottom of a glass of coffee, salt, sugar, corn starch, cinnamon

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Planet – bottom of a glass containing half and half, water, food coloring. Stars – salt, cinnamon, baking powder

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Nebula – makeup, olive oil, chalk, baby powder, salt, water

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Nebula with gas streams – cat fur, garlic powder, salt, flour, cumin, turmeric

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Distant galaxy – olive oil, sesame oil, water, cumin, cinnamon, flour

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Spiral galaxy – baking soda, curry powder, chalk, salt, sugar, cinnamon

Have you ever left the lid of a scanner open to find that the background of your image was rendered black instead of white? That, essentially, was the impetus behind photographer Navid Baraty’s latest project WANDER Space Probe. Using an Epson photo scanner, Baraty carefully positions various household items, many of which are edible, on the document table.

Cooking ingredients like baking soda, sugar and cinnamon act as distant stars and nebulas while glasses containing milk, water and food coloring create the planets. Once everything is aligned properly Baraty hits the scan button. The photographer describes his project as “Cosmic explorations of an imaginary space probe.” You can follow Baraty’s fictional space probe and its adventures into depths of the unknown on Facebook and Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

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