A Purple Cuttlefish with Comically Giant Googly Eyes Spotted on the Ocean Floor 

Nope, it’s not a rare Pokemon or even a plastic toy. Behold the Rossia pacifica or stubby squid, an altogether ridiculous looking relative to the cuttlefish that was recently spotted by the E/V Nautilus off the coast of California at a depth of 900 meters (2,950 feet). Researchers in the video can be heard discussing how creature’s giant eyes almost look painted on, giving it the appearance of a discarded children’s toy. “This species spends life on the seafloor, activating a sticky mucus jacket and burrowing into the sediment to camouflage, leaving their eyes poking out to spot prey like shrimp and small fish,” says the Nautilus team in a Youtube comment. (via Gizmodo)

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A Bird’s Nest Tearoom Perched Atop a 300-Year-Old Camphor Tree in Japan 

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All photos by Koji Fujii for Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP

Architect Hiroshi Nakamura had always been intrigued by how some crows utilize found coat hangers as a structural element in their nests. With this idea in mind, a unique opportunity presented itself when treehouse builder Takashi Kobayashi contacted him with an unusual site for a tearoom: 10 meters above the ground in a 300-year-old cinnamomum camphora tree growing precariously on the side of a mountain that overlooks the ocean in Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan. Using the coat hangers as a starting point he designed the Bird’s Nest Atami Tearoom using a variety of minimally invasive construction techniques meant to protect the integrity of the tree.

“Hangers are not only durable but also highly elastic, and they offer more hooks to connect than branches and hence are easier to assemble,” he shares. “Crows, flying deftly across the dichotomy of natural and artificial, are creating a functional and comfortable environment.” Thus the tearoom became a lightweight scaffold-type structure that works in harmony with the trees branches instead of being directly anchored to it. From Nakamura’s notes on the project:

For the foundation, we carefully inserted pier type foundations between the roots in order to avoid the use of concrete and large-scale excavation. Using the structure itself as scaffolding, we assembled it by avoiding the branches as birds create their nest, adding or taking out components based on structural analysis. We mortared the room interior to be like a swallow’s nest. The design leaves open the possibility for visitors to experience nest building by picking up branches from the mountain side and fitting them into walls inside.

The tearoom is part of the KAI Atami resort, and you can see more views both inside and out on the Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP website. Please take me with you. (via ARCHatlas)

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New Cityscapes in Motion Painted by Valerio D’Ospina 

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Early Morning in Manhattan, 2014, oil on canvas, 84x55in.

As if viewing cityscapes from the vantage point of a bird swooping through the sky or from the window of a speeding car, Italian artist Valerio D’Ospina (previously) sets the world in motion through quick and expressive brushstrokes. The artist imbues the streets of Italy, New York, and Paris with a bold sense of energy that can appear both exciting or foreboding depending on your perspective. D’Ospina also finds beauty in industrial transportation, specifically oil tankers and old locomotives that lumber into rail yards or sit docked in harbors with a captivating sense of dignity.

D’Ospina trained in Florence and Paris before moving to Philadelphia. You can see more of his work through Barbara Frigerio Contemporary Art and Rarity Gallery. He also had a recent solo show titled Transient Glance at Mike Wright Gallery in Denver. (via Design Milk)

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The Corner Building, 2015, oil on panel, 48x25in.

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Rush Hour, 2015, oil on panel, 17x31in.

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Rainy Day in NYC, 2015, oil on canvas, 36x36in.

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Walk in the Shade, 2015, oil on panel, 25x49in.

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Shipyard, 2015, oil on panel, 48x48in.

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Esb in the Evening, 2016, oil on canvas, 45.5x65in.

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Functional Mixtape Coffee Tables 

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Catering to musicians and music lovers alike, Los Angeles-based company TAYBLES has created a functional piece of furniture that also acts as a nostalgic throwback to the time of homemade mixtapes. The trio of artists behind the company produces cassette tape coffee tables, each work crafted from hardwood and sealed with clear epoxy. Every table also comes with a classic cassette label affixed to the top, and LED lights hidden within the center of the mixtape’s holes. You can buy your own custom mixtape on the company’s Etsy shop 214Graffiti, and browse more designs on their website. (via So Super Awesome)

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A Picture Frame Powered by Strobe Lights Turns Everyday Objects into Slow Motion Sculptures 

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For over 15 years, scientist and artist Jeff Lieberman has been fascinated by how objects move in slow motion since first mastering high-speed photography at MIT. His experiments eventually landed him a hosting gig at Discovery’s Time Warp where he uses high speed cameras to explore a variety of everyday occurrences in slow motion. Two years ago Lieberman began to wonder if there might be a way to bring the optical illusion of slow motion imagery into the real world. What if you could see a slow motion object up close and practically reach out and touch it? The result is Slow Dance, a tiny environment that appears to slow down time.

Slow Dance is a picture frame that makes use of strobe lights to turn any object you place inside of it appear to move in slow motion. Lieberman shares:

Strobe lights are nothing new. From the photos of Eadweard Muybridge to the photos of Doc Edgerton, extremely fast strobe lights have been helping us to see into fast motions. On a dancefloor, strobe lights turn us into stop motion animations. But we’ve put strobe light to use in a different fashion.

By using high speed strobe lights blinking 80 times a second, your eyes cannot even see that they are blinking — the light looks continuous. By synchronizing the strobes to the high-speed vibration of objects (feathers, branches, flowers, etc), we create the visual illusion of those objects moving in slow motion. This is a phenomenon called persistence of vision, and works similarly to the way a TV works — by flickering frozen images quickly enough that we perceive them as continuous motion.

Slow Dance just went up on Kickstarter and appears to have funded almost instantly. You can see more photos and videos about how it works here.

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New European Mosaic Floors Captured by Photographer Sebastian Erras 

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All images via @parisianfloors

German photographer Sebastian Erras (previously) made his mosaic-focused Instagram @parisianfloors famous by capturing the detailed floors beneath the feet of Parisians, one perspective shots that featured his feet transposed against colorful tiles. Now Erras does not limit himself to capturing only Paris’s tiles, and has been capturing some beautiful patterns found in the buildings of London. The above shot from London’s Royal College of Art is one of our personal favorites.

You can see more of Erras’s photography projects on his portfolio site. (via Culture N Lifestyle)

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