Cybele Young’s Paper Sculptures Depict Everyday Objects Metamorphosing into Otherworldly Creatures

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I Thought They Worked Better. Paper. 33 x 28 x 2.5 in.

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I Thought They Worked Better. Detail.

A pair of yellow headphones. A violin case. A set of keys. All miniature objects faithfully crafted from Japanese papers by Toronto-based artist Cybele Young, any one of which would be considered striking in its own right, but she doesn’t stop there. Each object, however mundane, is displayed step-by-step in a dramatic process of metamorphosis as it transforms into unusual organic lifeforms. A pair of rollerskates gradually becomes a network of fungus-like membranes, or an ordinary handbag grows an unnerving coat of sharp spikes. From her artist statement:

Engaging with abstract and familiar motifs, I juxtapose sculptures to create a sense of dialogue or play between them. I approach my work in series and components, ultimately building an ongoing inventory of personal experience and observation.

I compile these in various arrangements to create communities that interact and form new relationships – much like the small seemingly insignificant moments in our everyday lives that come together to create unexpected outcomes. These manifest as miniature theatres – one act plays, where shifts of scale and perception occur. Despite the absence of the human form there is an implied presence, where the viewer can project themselves into another world.

Young’s work is currently on view for two more days at Forum Gallery in New York, so don’t miss it. (via Colossal Submissions, thnx David!)

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You Know That Place. Paper. 30 x 40 x 4 in.

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If I Had Learned Earlier. Paper. 22 x 35 x 2.5 in.

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In Close Range. Paper. 24 x 35 x 2.5 in.

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It Came With Me Everywhere. Paper. 19 x 38 x 4 in.

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It’s Worth it This Time. Paper hair curler, coils. 21 x 32 x 2 in.

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It’s Worth it This Time. Detail.

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I Was Thinking of Something Else. Paper lawn chair, leaves. 17 x 24 x 3 in.

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Swirling Illustrations by James R. Eads Explore Human Connections and the Natural World

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Multi-disciplinary artist and illustrator James R. Eads plays with motion and color to render harmonizing illustrations of people and nature. With swirling van Gogh inspired skies and percussive strokes of color, his style is well-suited for meditations on human connection and the relationships between humans and the natural world. He also makes pretty wicked gig posters.

The LA-based artist lives and works at the The Brewery where his studio is open to the public during bi-annual art walks. You can follow his work on Instagram or Facebook, and prints are available in his shop.

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Photographer Guillaume Amat Places Mirrors Into Industrial and Natural Landscapes to Look Both Beyond and Behind

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For Guillaume Amat's “Open Fields” project he placed a mirrored stand in various landscapes, reflecting the opposing environment back within the image to create a double interpretation of the surrounding scene. These reflections contain dark figures against bright fields, homes in barren landscapes, bits of foliage contained within stretches of industry, and even a horse that pops into the frame.

Each image is taken with a 4×5 inch camera, the included mirror measuring 31.5 x 47.2 inches. Amat wanted to concentrate on the double interpretation of the landscape seen outside and within the mirror, working on the concept of territory as space.

Independent curator and writer Paul Wombell compared this series to the Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice saying, “With the use of the camera and a mirror Guillaume Amat has made photographic images that simultaneously look forward and backwards. They create a strange dreamlike landscape where buildings and figures float in the center of the picture and suggest that he has two sets of eyes, both at the front and back of his head. Orpheus would have been impressed.”

Amat lives and works in Paris where he mostly focuses on long-term projects to produce cohesive photographic narratives existing somewhere between documentary and poetry. (via vjeranski)

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Making-Off Open Fields /#2 Le Calvaire des Dunes.

Making-Off Open Fields /#2 Le Calvaire des Dunes.

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Archaeologists Unearth Trove of 2,000 Mysterious Gold Spirals in Denmark

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Bronze Age gold spirals found in Boeslund, 900-700 BC. Credit: Morten Petersen / Zealand Museum.

A team of archaeologists working in Boeslunde, Denmark recently stumbled onto an intriguing mystery: nearly 2,000 tightly-wound golden spirals dating back to the Bronze Age. The discovery of gold in Boeslunde isn’t uncommon, as numerous gold objects have been unearthed in the region over the last few years. But the purpose of these coils has stumped archaeologists who refer to the find as the “golden enigma.”

The spirals are made from extremely pure gold that was hammered flat to just 0.1 millimeter thick. Some pieces measure up to 1.18 inches long and all together weigh between 200 to 300 grams (7-10 ounces). Their exact purpose is anyone’s guess, but Flemming Kaul, a curator with the National Museum of Denmark, believes the coils are most likely related to prehistoric Bronze Age people who were known to offer gold to higher powers as part of sun rituals.

“The sun was one of the most sacred symbols in the Bronze Age and gold had a special magic,” Kaul writes. “Maybe the priest-king wore a gold ring on his wrist, and gold spirals on his cloak and his hat, where they during ritual sun ceremonies shone like the sun.” It’s also suggested the gold was simply buried as part of an elaborate sacrifice.

Whatever the use or meaning behind the pieces, it’s an extraordinary and priceless find. The local museum in
Skaelskor already held a temporary viewing before the spirals find a permanent home. You can read more over on the History Blog. (via Neatorama, Gizmodo)

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Gold spirals surrounded by flakes of birch pitch. Credit: Flemming Kaul / National Museum of Denmark.

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Gold spiral in situ. Credit: Flemming Kaul / National Museum of Denmark.

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Credot:Morten Petersen / Museum Vestsjælland.

Calamityware: Mugs That Remind You It Could Always Be Much Worse

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Rendered in a style mimicking traditional blue willow pattern design, artist Don Moyer illustrated these fun It-Could-Be-Worse Mugs that remind you that no matter how bad your day is, things could be catastrophically worse. How bad? Think zombie poodles, pirates, attacking UFOs, and aggressive pterodactyls swooping from the sky. The mugs are a companion piece to his ongoing series of Calamityware dishware with similar abominations depicted on fine porcelain plates first featured here last year. The set of 4 mugs are currently funding on Kickstarter. (via The Awesomer)

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The Fourth Wall: A Rare View of Famous European Theater Auditoriums Photographed from the Stage

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For his ongoing series The Fourth Wall, Hamburg-based photographer Klaus Frahm shatters the illusion of stagecraft by taking us behind-the-scenes of several European theaters. Shot from the vantage point of the stage looking toward the audience, the photos reveal the stark contrast of ornate auditoriums and the technological scaffolding that facilitates a major theatrical production. Frahm captures the elaborate configurations of lights and the surprising enormity of the fly space hidden just behind the red curtain that can be up to three times larger than the seating area.

Frahm says the intention behind his photography “is to give way for a new perspective, to entertain, to offer a fresh sight on familiar things,” and to “reveal something laying under the surface.” The Fourth Wall project began in 2010 when he was documenting a new theater for an architect which involved a series of shots facing the wings and other angles from the stage. When reviewing his polaroids later that day he was immediately struck by the image-within-an-image contrast of the warm, fully-lit theater seats and the cold, hidden infrastructure. Klaus had ingeniously turned the tables: suddenly the audience was the spectacle and the stage was reality.

You can see more from the Fourth Wall series on Fram’s website. If you enjoyed this, also check out the work of David Leventi. (via It’s Nice That, thnx Kevin!)

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