Sponsored // A’ Design Awards & Competition – Call for Entries

A’ Design Awards is a premier annual juried design competition that honors the best designers, architects, engineers, design studios and design-oriented companies worldwide to provide them publicity, fame, and recognition. Every year, projects that focus on innovation, technology, design, and creativity are awarded with the A’ Award.

Entries to the A’ Design Award & Competition are peer-reviewed and anonymously voted by an expert 50-person jury panel consisting of scholars, design professionals and media members. A’ Design Award winner projects will be exhibited in three countries in 2015, a tour ending with Dublin, Ireland to celebrate Dublin’s 2015 World Design Hub designation. Some of our most recent favorites include the POOLEAF Plastic Ball Pen, the Vana Installation by Orproject, Vinylize Toney Eyewear, and the Botanical Life Calendar.

Deadline for entries to the A’ Design Award & Competition is on September 30, 2014. Results will be announced on April 15, 2015. Submit your work at adesignaward.com/registration.
Sponsored // A’ Design Awards & Competition – Call for Entries sponsor

Rush Hour: Hilarious Footage of an Intersection Edited to Create Potentially Catastrophic Traffic Patterns

Rush Hour: Hilarious Footage of an Intersection Edited to Create Potentially Catastrophic Traffic Patterns video art traffic humor cars

Fernando Livschitz of Black Sheep Films (previously) is back with his magnificent live video editing skills. This time the Argentina-based director transforms a typical intersection into an absurdly choreographed dance of cloned cars, bicyclists and pedestrians who at almost every moment appear destined to collide. I’ve watched this three times and I still keep yelling at the screen. So well done.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Postcards for Ants: A 365-Day Miniature Painting Project by Lorraine Loots

Postcards for Ants: A 365 Day Miniature Painting Project by Lorraine Loots painting miniature

Postcards for Ants is an ongoing painting project by Cape Town artist Lorraine Loots who has been creating a miniature painting every single day since January 1, 2013. The artist works with paint brushes, pencils, and bare eyes to render superbly detailed paintings scarcely larger than a small coin. After the first year, Loots relaunched the project in a second phase inspired by Cape Town’s designation as World Design Capital 2014. On her website you can “reserve” a future painting (it’s all booked up for this year), and she’s also printed five limited edition postcards for each day. You can watch her work and hear a bit more about her inspiration in the video below by Gareth Pon, and she also regularly updates on Facebook. Hopefully we’ll see a 2015 project? (via Lustik)

Postcards for Ants: A 365 Day Miniature Painting Project by Lorraine Loots painting miniature

Postcards for Ants: A 365 Day Miniature Painting Project by Lorraine Loots painting miniature

Postcards for Ants: A 365 Day Miniature Painting Project by Lorraine Loots painting miniature

Postcards for Ants: A 365 Day Miniature Painting Project by Lorraine Loots painting miniature

Postcards for Ants: A 365 Day Miniature Painting Project by Lorraine Loots painting miniature

Postcards for Ants: A 365 Day Miniature Painting Project by Lorraine Loots painting miniature

Postcards for Ants: A 365 Day Miniature Painting Project by Lorraine Loots painting miniature

Postcards for Ants: A 365 Day Miniature Painting Project by Lorraine Loots painting miniature

Postcards for Ants: A 365 Day Miniature Painting Project by Lorraine Loots painting miniature

Postcards for Ants: A 365 Day Miniature Painting Project by Lorraine Loots painting miniature

See related posts on Colossal about , .

These Veiled Figures of Bronze and Marble by Kevin Francis Gray Seem to Drip with Fabric

These Veiled Figures of Bronze and Marble by Kevin Francis Gray Seem to Drip with Fabric sculpture marble bronze
Ballerina, 2011. Grey Bardiglio Marble. 190 x 45 x 52cm

Irish sculptor Kevin Francis Gray works primarily with bronze and marble to create idealized figures draped with fabric in the style of Neoclassical or Baroque figurative sculptures. Though, unlike gods or royalty that one might expect to see rendered in such incredible detail, Gray instead creates anonymous depictions of regular individuals he encounters near his studio in London, often people struggling with addiction or other difficult, real-world issues. From an essay about Gray’s work by Rachel Wilf:

The resulting works portray these subjects—often with personal histories marred by contemporary demons such as addiction—with dignity and importance, yet they also express a somber, contemplative quality emphasized by the artist’s consistent shrouding of his subject’s faces.

While some artists now rely on laser cutting or other machines to cut from marble, Gray instead works by hand, from start to finish, chiseling away just like Gian Lorenzo Bernini or Giuseppe Sanmartino might have done in the 17th or 18th century.

Gray studied at the National College of Art & Design in Dublin, the School of the Art Institute in Chicago, and received an MA in Fine Art from Goldsmith College in London. He’s now represented by Pace Gallery where he had his first exhibition with them earlier this year. You can see much more work in his online gallery.

These Veiled Figures of Bronze and Marble by Kevin Francis Gray Seem to Drip with Fabric sculpture marble bronze
Ballerina, 2011. Grey Bardiglio Marble. 190 x 45 x 52cm

These Veiled Figures of Bronze and Marble by Kevin Francis Gray Seem to Drip with Fabric sculpture marble bronze
Ballerina, 2011. Grey Bardiglio Marble. 190 x 45 x 52cm

These Veiled Figures of Bronze and Marble by Kevin Francis Gray Seem to Drip with Fabric sculpture marble bronze
Ballerina, 2011. Grey Bardiglio Marble. 190 x 45 x 52cm

These Veiled Figures of Bronze and Marble by Kevin Francis Gray Seem to Drip with Fabric sculpture marble bronze
Ballerina Bust, 2012. Black Carrara Marble. 41 x 35 x 35cm

These Veiled Figures of Bronze and Marble by Kevin Francis Gray Seem to Drip with Fabric sculpture marble bronze
Temporal Sitter, 2012. High Polished Bronze, Bardigilio Marble. 89.9 x 89.9 x 169.9cm

These Veiled Figures of Bronze and Marble by Kevin Francis Gray Seem to Drip with Fabric sculpture marble bronze
Temporal Sitter, 2012. High Polished Bronze, Bardigilio Marble. 89.9 x 89.9 x 169.9cm

These Veiled Figures of Bronze and Marble by Kevin Francis Gray Seem to Drip with Fabric sculpture marble bronze
Temporal Sitter, 2012. High Polished Bronze, Bardigilio Marble. 89.9 x 89.9 x 169.9cm

These Veiled Figures of Bronze and Marble by Kevin Francis Gray Seem to Drip with Fabric sculpture marble bronze
Temporal Sitter, 2011. Carrara Marble. 94 x 80 x 80 cm

These Veiled Figures of Bronze and Marble by Kevin Francis Gray Seem to Drip with Fabric sculpture marble bronze
Temporal Sitter, 2011. Carrara Marble. 94 x 80 x 80 cm

These Veiled Figures of Bronze and Marble by Kevin Francis Gray Seem to Drip with Fabric sculpture marble bronze
Temporal Sitter, 2011. Carrara Marble. 94 x 80 x 80 cm

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Florentijn Hofman’s Latest Work is a Gigantic Bunny Gazing Up at the Moon in Taiwan

Florentijn Hofman’s Latest Work is a Gigantic Bunny Gazing Up at the Moon in Taiwan  Taiwan rabbits installation animals

Florentijn Hofman’s Latest Work is a Gigantic Bunny Gazing Up at the Moon in Taiwan  Taiwan rabbits installation animals

Florentijn Hofman’s Latest Work is a Gigantic Bunny Gazing Up at the Moon in Taiwan  Taiwan rabbits installation animals

Florentijn Hofman’s Latest Work is a Gigantic Bunny Gazing Up at the Moon in Taiwan  Taiwan rabbits installation animals

Florentijn Hofman’s Latest Work is a Gigantic Bunny Gazing Up at the Moon in Taiwan  Taiwan rabbits installation animals

Florentijn Hofman’s Latest Work is a Gigantic Bunny Gazing Up at the Moon in Taiwan  Taiwan rabbits installation animals

Florentijn Hofman’s Latest Work is a Gigantic Bunny Gazing Up at the Moon in Taiwan  Taiwan rabbits installation animals

Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman, known for his large scale installations of animal characters, recently unveiled his latest work. Located at the Dayuan Town Naval Base in Taiwan, “Moon Rabbit” is an enormous yet adorable bunny that’s propped up against a grassy military bunker gazing up at the moon. To create the large-scale work, which is based on the East Asian folklore about a rabbit that lives on the moon, Hofman first created a wood and Styrofoam frame. And to achieve the fluffiness but also keep it weather-resistant the artist used over 12,000 sheets of Tyvek paper, a material normally reserved for home builders. Unfortunately, the bunny caught fire earlier today as workers were trying to disassemble it. But its counterpart can still be seen on the moon, or at least that’s how the story goes. (via Street Art News)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

A Collision of Cultures and Mediums in Paul Louise-Julie’s Sculptures and 3D Paintings

A Collision of Cultures and Mediums in Paul Louise Julies Sculptures and 3D Paintings sculpture paper origami Africa

A Collision of Cultures and Mediums in Paul Louise Julies Sculptures and 3D Paintings sculpture paper origami Africa

A Collision of Cultures and Mediums in Paul Louise Julies Sculptures and 3D Paintings sculpture paper origami Africa

A Collision of Cultures and Mediums in Paul Louise Julies Sculptures and 3D Paintings sculpture paper origami Africa

A Collision of Cultures and Mediums in Paul Louise Julies Sculptures and 3D Paintings sculpture paper origami Africa

A Collision of Cultures and Mediums in Paul Louise Julies Sculptures and 3D Paintings sculpture paper origami Africa

A Collision of Cultures and Mediums in Paul Louise Julies Sculptures and 3D Paintings sculpture paper origami Africa

A Collision of Cultures and Mediums in Paul Louise Julies Sculptures and 3D Paintings sculpture paper origami Africa

A Collision of Cultures and Mediums in Paul Louise Julies Sculptures and 3D Paintings sculpture paper origami Africa

A Collision of Cultures and Mediums in Paul Louise Julies Sculptures and 3D Paintings sculpture paper origami Africa

New York-based artist Paul Louise-Julie has spent the last 7 years researching African civilizations and art, including a year-long journey to West Africa and the Sahara Desert. These sculptures (and 3D paintings) are part of a resulting body of work Louise-Julie created in response to his discoveries and experiences there. The pieces represent a successful collision of artistic methods and themes from multiple cultures, blending ideas from Western contemporary art, traditional African methods, and even Japanese-influenced origami and paper craft. The artworks you see here are among his first sculptures. Louise-Julie is also working on a companion graphic novel that will be released gradually starting later this year.

You can see more of his work over on Behance and Facebook. (via Feather of Me, Cross Connect)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Give it Up: Composer ‘Kutiman’ Creates Entirely New Song Using 23 Videos of Other Musicians

Give it Up is a new track released yesterday by Israeli musician and composer Kutiman. The song was created entirely using vocal and instrument tracks lifted from 23 different YouTube videos of mostly amateur musicians, credited here. If you liked this, you’ll be happy to learn this is just the first track off his upcoming album Thru You Too which the artist says will be comprised entirely of unrelated YouTube videos.

In other composing-music-with-videos news, Andrew Huang created a version of the 80s hit 99 Red Balloons… using only red balloons. Included here for your listening pleasure.

(via Adam Savage)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Page 5 of 484«...4567...»