Anatomical Murals of Bisected Animals by Street Artist Nychos 

Street artist Nychos paints large murals of bisected animals and humans, large works that allow you to take a peek inside their anatomical structure. These works include extremely detailed bone and vein structures, such as the Tyrannosaurus rex he painted in Oakland, California late last year. Most recently he has been on a tour through Australia where he has made stops in both Sydney and Melbourne to put up works.

Nychos opened a solo exhibition of works on paper with Juddy Roller Gallery in Melbourne during this tour titled Monochrome Organism on March 10. You can see more of his public and canvas-based paintings on his Instagram and Facebook. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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Elegant Wooden Birds Dipped in Watercolor Plumage by Moisés Hernández 

Immersed Birds, 2017. Ash and watercolor.

Mexican designer Moisés Hernández brings his distinct flair for minimalism to this new series of avian sculptures titled Immersed Birds. Each piece is a continuous wooden object milled with CNC technology which is then dipped into a carefully considered sequence of watercolors. The overlaying hues mimic the plumage of a toucan, hummingbird, and Mexican quetzal. You can see more of Hernández’s work on Instagram. (via Booooooom)

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Adobe Stock Celebrates the Female Creator 

Over the last 30 years Adobe has become synonymous with industry-leading software for creative professionals who utilize Photoshop, Illustrator, and Premiere as indispensable tools in their daily workflow. Despite this success, Adobe hasn’t stopped innovating in its relentless passion to support designers, photographers, and filmmakers in achieving their visions. Case in point: catering to the explosive demand for fresh video and imagery with Adobe Stock, a resource of over 60 million visual assets that is fully integrated into Adobe’s applications.

For the month of March, in conjunction with Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day, Adobe is celebrating its own female creators. This week we take a look at videographer and Adobe Stock video contributor Helen Fields who has contributed a broad portfolio of visual assets that seek to break down stereotypes and bring about social change by exploring a much fuller representation of the human experience. Fields is a former criminal lawyer based in the UK whose dramatic career shift has proven wildly successful. As the need for video has surged across the web and social media, her work has become a subtly important backdrop for a wide range of creative endeavors.

“People are keen to bridge the gender gap,” shares Fields about her work. “They want women in unconventional roles. If you don’t include women in your content, you’re restricting your own portfolio.”

You can explore much more of Fields’ video work in her Adobe Stock portfolio, and learn more about her on Adobe’s Blog. Here are a few of our favorites:

To meet the demands of apps and platforms that are increasingly video-centric, Adobe Stock offers both HD and 4K videos available instantly to all Creative Cloud users, not to mention millions of high-quality photos, illustrations, vector graphics, 3D assets, and templates for a variety of projects. Monthly subscription plans are available for individuals, small teams, and enterprise solutions. Learn more about plans and pricing on Adobe Stock. If you’re interested in selling your own stock photos and videos, visit the Adobe Contributor Portal.

This post was sponsored by Adobe Stock.

Traveling Landscapes: Miniature Ecosystems Tucked Inside Vintage Suitcases by Kathleen Vance 

As part of her ongoing series titled Traveling Landscapes, New York-based artist Kathleen Vance constructs entire landscapes inside of old steamer trunks and repurposed luggage. Many of the pieces incorporate real running water, soil, and living plant life to form encapsulated environments, though others are constructed from common model making materials and resin. The pieces are intended to speak to the fragility of drinking water reservoirs and issues of water rights. She shares in her artist statement:

Materials that are commonly defined as natural and artificial are combined in the creation of these works, isolating aspects that are indicative of the ‘natural’ (while sometimes are considered unnatural). The landscapes created are transformative in their illusion of a nature scene; they are contained in traveling cases to magnify the displacement of a seemingly natural landscape in an unusual framework. These pieces extenuate the desire for ‘untouched’ natural environments, and the claim and proprietorship that are placed on plots of land, which carries over to water rights.

Vance recently unveiled a larger site-specific installation titled Traveling Landscape: Precious Cargo with ROCKELMANN & at VOLTA NY 2017. (via Art Ruby, Inhabitat)

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The Shaolin Flying Monks Temple Blasts Monks Into the Sky Above a Mountainside Amphitheater 

All photos by Ansis Starks, courtesy Mailitis Architects

Perched on the Songshan mountain in rural Henan, China, this new temple designed by Latvian architecture studio Mailītis Architects brings a whole new perspective to the legendary Shaolin monks: specifically an aerial perspective. The recently completed Shaolin Flying Monks Temple contains a one-of-a-kind levitation pavilion that houses a vertical wind tunnel designed in part by Aerodium that blasts participants toward the sky in the center of a 230-seat amphitheater.

“The concept is to tell the history of Zen and Kung-Fu through artistic performances and architectural image of the building itself,” says Mailītis. “It serves as a metaphor for mountain and trees and was inspired by Songshan mountain – the natural environment for monks to develop their skills.”

You can see more photos of the new landmark building on Mailītis Architects’ website. (via Dezeen)

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Found Photographs Embroidered With Colorful Thread by Julie Cockburn 

“The Conundrum” (2016), hand embroidery on found photograph, all images courtesy of Flowers Gallery London and New York

London-based artist Julie Cockburn transforms vintage photographs by embroidering across their surfaces, adding bright pops of thread to portraits that are either black and white or have faded over time. Using found images from eBay and flea markets, Cockburn obscures the faces of strangers, layering the portraits with multi-colored dots, geometric patterns, or ovals in varying gradients.

Cockburn will exhibit work with The Photographers’ Gallery at The Photography Show presented by AIPAD March 30 through April 2, 2017 on New York City’s Pier 94. You can see more of Cockburn’s embroidered images on her Instagram and Facebook. (via Hyperallergic)

“Quizitive” (2016)

“Honeydew” (2013)

“The Secret” (2012)

“Point of View” (2014)

“The Orthodontist” (2014)

“Viewpoint” (2012)

“Morphine” (2014)

“Troublemaker” (2015)

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