Ominous Storms Photographed in Black and White by Mitch Dobrowner 

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Regan, North Dakota, 2011

Photographer Mitch Dobrowner travels the U.S. and sets up his camera in front of apocalyptic storms that rise above rural fields in Oklahoma, Kansas, and North Dakota. Inspired by photographers like Minor White and Ansel Adams, he captures breathtaking landscapes that remind us of nature’s raw power by juxtaposing the endless flat plains of the southern and midwest states with dramatic weather formations. Lightning strikes and tornadoes feature heavily in Dobrowner’s black and white images that at times look like moments right out of the first few minutes of the Wizard of Oz.

Dobrowner has exhibited in galleries across the U.S. and internationally since 2005 and is represented by Photo-Eye Gallery in Santa Fe and Kopeikin Gallery in LA. You can see much more of his work on Facebook. (thnx, Laura!)

Peckham, Oklahoma

Peckham, Oklahoma

Peckham, Oklahoma

Peckham, Oklahoma

Bolton, Kansas

Bolton, Kansas

Syracuse, Kansas

Syracuse, Kansas

Newkirk, Oklahoma

Newkirk, Oklahoma

Syracuse, Kansas

Syracuse, Kansas

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Arcus Cloud

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Vortex Over Field, 2015

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Strata Storm and Bales, 2015

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Densely Textured Sculptures Produced From Thousands of Porcelain Spines by Artist Zemer Peled 

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Using thousands of handcrafted porcelain shards, Israeli born artist Zemer Peled (previously here and here) produces large-scale sculptures that are densely textured. The works change depending on one’s stance, at once looking as if they are made with soft feathers or sharp spines. In either circumstance the pieces reflect the natural world, imitating swirling wind patterns or rolling planes of grass.

“The forms are never static; the visual dance of sharp ceramic parts conveys a sense of constant movement,” explains Mark Moore Gallery. “Like a murmuration of starlings, the sculptures appear to shift shapes as you move around them, an identity becoming and unbecoming in front of you.”

A solo exhibition of Peled’s work, “Nomad,” is currently on display at Mark Moore Gallery in Los Angeles through October 29. You can see more of the artists work on her website and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Misshapen Glass Vases by Studio E.O Appear to Melt Atop Angular Stone Platforms 

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All photos by Gustav Almestål for Studio E.O

Indefinite Vases is a recent project by multidisciplinary design practice Studio E.O based in Stockholm. Working with handblown glass and cut stone, traditional vase forms are melted and cooled around sharp edges to create place-specific vessels. From their project statement:

The project is an exploration of the relationship between geometric and organic forms – transparent and opaque. Indefinite melting material interacts with definite angular forms and gravity determines the relationship in between. Indefinite Vases are sculptures or containers. Functional or decorative. The contrast between the cut stone and the form of the hand blown glass emphasizes the relation between space and object, an interplay between a fragile material and its solid counterpart.

At the time of production a limited number of vases were made available through Galerie kreo, and you can see many more photos on Studio E.O’s website. (via My Amp Goes to 11)

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A Caiman Wearing a Crown of Butterflies Photographed by Mark Cowan 

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Photograph by Mark Cowan

While traveling through the Amazon to study reptile and amphibian diversity with the Herpetology Division at the University of Michigan, photographer Mark Cowan happened upon a strange sight: a caiman whose head was nearly covered in butterflies. The phenomenon itself isn’t particularly unusual, salt is critical to the survival of many creatures like butterflies and bees who sometimes drink tears from reptiles in regions where the mineral is scarce (we’ve seen the same thing happen with turtles). What made this sight so unusual was seeing the butterflies organize themselves into three different species groups atop the caiman’s head.

Uh, also, that side eye!

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Cowan’s photograph received special commendation from the 2016 Royal Society Publishing photography competition, you can see the rest of this year’s finalists here.

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150th Anniversary Edition of “Alice in Wonderland” Features Rare 1969 Salvador Dalí Illustrations 

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Advice From a Caterpillar

While glancing at Salvador Dalí’s paintings one might get the sense that they’ve tripped down their mind’s own rabbit hole, all of a sudden dropped within a barren wasteland filed with abstract objects and creatures. The pairing then, of Dalí and Alice in Wonderland writer and mathematician Lewis Carroll, seem perfectly matched—two men whose minds travel far beyond the cutesy corners of an average fairytale. In the 1960s an editor at Random House realized this genius partnership, commissioning Dalí to illustrate an exclusive edition of Alice in Wonderland, of which Dalí signed every copy.

This rare edition of Alice was long coveted by rare book collectors and scholars, making only occasional appearances for study or the auction block. However, for the 150th anniversary of Lewis’ surrealist tale, this one-of-a-kind collaboration has finally been printed for the public by Princeton University Press. The deluxe edition, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, features an introduction explaining Dalí’s connection to Carroll by Lewis Carroll Society of North America President Mark Burstein, and exploration by mathematician Thomas Banchoff of the mathematics found in Dalí’s work and illustrations. (via Brain Pickings, Lost at E Minor)

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Down the Rabbit Hole

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The Pool of Tears

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The Queen’s Croquet Ground

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The Caucus Race and a Long Tale

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The Rabbit Sends in a Little Bill

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Pig and Pepper

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Mad Tea Party

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Alice’s Evidence

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The Mock Turtle’s Story

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The Lobster’s Quadrille

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Frontispiece for Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

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Uncertain Journey: A Flotilla of Wireframe Boats Overflow With a Dense Canopy of Red Yarn 

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Chiharu Shiota, Uncertain Journey, 2016, Installation view, Courtesy the artist and Blain|Southern, All photos by Christian Glaeser.

For her latest installation at Blain|Southern in Berlin, artist Chiharu Shiota has constructed a twisted network of tangled red yarn that rises from a collection of skeletal boats. Titled Uncertain Journey, the artwork envelopes the viewer by creating a blood-red canopy reminiscent of a neural network that meanders in every direction. The piece is a continuation of Shiota’s work with yarn, most notably her 2015 installation The Key in the Hand for the 56th Venice Art Biennale. Uncertain Journey will be on view starting September 17 through November 12, 2016. (via Designboom)

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