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Enchanting New Light Box Dioramas by Hari & Deepti Tell Stories of Exploration, Travel and Adventure


It’s been over a year since we last checked in with artist duo Deepti Nair and Harikrishnan Panickerof Hari & Deepti, who construct elegant cut paper dioramas inside backlit light boxes. The medium is perfect for depicting the depth of thick forests, pools of water, or subterranean caves inhabited by spirits and fantastic creatures.

Over the last year Hari & Deepti relocated from Denver to Mumbai where they just completed work for their first European show at Blank Space Gallery in Oslo titled ‘We Are All Made of Stars.’ Like previous exhibitions the event was held in a darkened gallery with the only light emitted from their artwork to better emphasize the themes of travel and adventure depicted in their light boxes.

Keep an eye out for new works in December at Context Art Miami with Black Book Gallery. You can also see more on Instagram.













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The Nameless Paint Set: An Alternative Way of Understanding Color





As companies like Crayola dream up more inventive and brandable colors for their crayons like “inchworm” or “mango tango,” a young designer duo from Japan created this alternative way of exploring colors by doing away with names altogether. Nameless Paints are a set of 10 paint tubes designed by Yusuke Imai and Ayami Moteki that replace more familiar color names (which can be a tad more ambiguous, see: “jazzbery jam!”) with visual depictions of the primary colors magenta, yellow, and cyan mixed inside. The visual labeling system also relies on proportion to depict more or less of different colors to create additional shades of green, orange, or blue.

“By not assigning names to the colors we want to expand the definition of what a color can be, and the various shades they can create by mixing them,” says Imai.

While using written names may ultimately prove more useful (and more fun) in the long run, Nameless Paints are a fun way to explore how color works. The design originally won a 2012 Kokuyo Design Award, and has undergone refinements over the last few years. The set finally go on sale in October of 2015 in Japan for roughly $15. (via Spoon & Tamago)

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The Mesmerizing Process of Making a Glass Chandelier from Scratch




Walking into a hotel ballroom, say, and considering a gigantic glass chandelier suspended from the ceiling, you probably fall into one of two camps: “Wow, that chandelier is totally incredible.” OR “Wow, if that fell from the ceiling it would be totally incredible.” Regardless of which camp you fall into, you’ve probably never considered the process behind creating a genuine glass chandelier from raw materials. Lucky for us, the Science Channel went behind the scenes to film the elaborate glass-working process required to build the fanciest 150-pound lighting mechanism imaginable. Unfortunately this clip fails to credit the studio and artists shown on screen. Anyone know? (via Sploid)

Update: This is a peek inside the Baccarat crystal studio… because it’s written on their shirts. (thnx, Laurent for helping us read words)

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New Architectural Collages That Double as Visual Poems by Matthias Jung


Matthias Jung (previously) creates worlds of surreal architecture that inhabit vast photographed landscapes. The works merge together different elements of photography to create unusual compositions, structures you might vividly remember from a dream. By placing the composite structures in commonplace landscapes the German-based graphic designer preserves their believability, allowing us to momentarily trick our brains into thinking these places actually exist in environments we have not yet explored.

Jung refers to the works as “architectural short poems,” a perfect description for how they are visually consumed by the eye. You can see more of his surreal architectural collages on his website gallery here.









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Vertical Panoramic Photographs of New York Churches by Richard Silver

Church of St. Vincent Ferrer

Richard Silver (previously) has a unique way of looking at architecture, building composite photographs from several images that seamlessly reveal a structure’s interior. His new series captures the insides of New York churches, and are perfectly timed for the Pope’s impending arrival on U.S. soil. These images are composed of 6-10 shots, forming a vertical panorama so cohesive that it might give you vertigo.

Although Silver has been to hundreds of churches during his career and many years of travel, it’s only recently that he figured out how to capture the expansive inner beauty of their architecture. “Finding the perfect location in the center aisle then shooting vertically from the pew to the back of the church gives the perspective that only architecture of this style can portray,” says Silver.

Church of St. Stephen / Church of St. Paul the Apostle

Silver was born and raised in New York and has visited 75 countries in his life, including 13 last year alone. His previous careers involved computer science, real estate, and a stint on Wall Street, but he embraced photography full-time in 2011. You can see more of his vertical church series on his Flickr page here.

Calvary Episcopal Church

Serbian Orthodox Cathedral of St. Sava / Church of the Village

Church of St. Francis Xavier

Vincent St. de Paul / Most Holy Redeemer Church

St. Monica’s Church

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Vibrantly Hued Canvas Sculptures by Artist Duo ‘Stallman’


Meticulously folding canvas and layering color, the art duo Stallman (Jason Hallman and Stephen Stum) turn a traditional painting surface on its head, using the structure of the canvas to give their works vibrant depth. The two artists are deeply inspired by gradients found in the natural world, their color selection and positioning appearing almost topographic.

The Pacific Northwest based pair calls this body of work “Canvas on Edge,” giving canvas the leading roll within each each piece. By positioning the medium outward its curved shapes become all about depth and form and serve as large, elevated line drawings.

Hallman and Stum (the two combined their names to create their artist title) are both partners in the studio and life. “We create together, one acting as the right side of the brain and the other the left,” says Stallman. “This union of dynamic minds dissolves the boundaries of what is possible turning the ordinary into extraordinary.”

The duo currently has an exhibition of new works at Hall | Spassov Gallery that continues until September 30, 2015. You can see more sculptures on their Facebook page here.








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