Mesmerizing Kaleidoscopic GIFs by Anna Taberko 

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Minnesota-based illustrator and animator Anna Taberko has been producing a lovely series of kaleidoscopic animations where flowers, seed pods and butterflies morph into each other to create self-sustaining loops. The works are the artist’s first attempt at making phenakistoscope inspired animations, an early technique that placed drawings onto a spinning disc to trick the eye into seeing movement. Taberko is a recent graduate from MCAD and shares many of her animation experiments on Tumblr.

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Broken Ceramics Found on the Beach, Turned Into Chopstick Rests Using Kintsugi 

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“As every Japanese has realized, the waves can take away a great deal from us,” says artist Tomomi Kamoshita. But it is also true that we greatly benefit from it.” Using broken pieces of ceramics that she picked up on the shore, and combining it with pieces of her own broken ceramics, the Tokyo-based potter uses the ancient kintsugi method of repairing ceramics to turn the shards into one-of-a-kind chopstick rests.

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If the broken pieces of ceramics could talk, some would tell you that they fell off a ship. Others would tell you they were swept away by a tsunami. Some might even simply have been thrown away. But rather than focus on their tragic state of being, and how they got that way, Kamoshita looks to the future; the revival. “I wanted to revive what wave have brought us,” she says. In fact, many of the shards have been polished by the waves and sand while all the while retaining their beautiful colors.

As a potter, Kamoshita was skilled in the ancient craft of kintsugi: “a Japanese traditional repairing technique used to connect broken pieces together with gold.” Using this method – intended to accentuate the cracks rather than hide them – the artist pieces together the broken ceramics she’s collected. The pink pieces, she explains, are her own broken ceramics, which she likens to the cherry blossoms that come back to life every Spring.

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Kamoshita received honorable mention in the 2016 Ronin | Globus Artist-in-Residence Program, for which Spoon & Tamago [Colossal’s sister site] was a judge. The ceramic pieces will be on display in the group exhibition “Contemporary Talents of Japan” from June 23 to July 30, 2016 at the Ronin Gallery in New York. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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An In-Your-Face Motion Capture Dance Performance Amidst a Flurry of Feathers, Fur, and Particles 

This three minute dance performance was created by Method Studios for this year’s AICP Awards as a way to promote different sponsors. Each sponsor is imagined briefly as a dancing avatar rendered with the help of motion capture, procedural animation and dynamic simulations. The wild costumes seem to draw inspiration from artists like Nick Cave, Wrecking Crew Orchestra, and even Kohei Nawa. To be sure, there’s a lot going on here, but all of it adds up to something pretty amazing, a killer dance performance that merges cutting edge animation techniques. (via Vimeo)

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The Miniature Street Interventions of Slinkachu 

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Blink, and you’ll miss it. Secreted amongst weeds growing in the cracks of sidewalks or hidden in a tiny pile of trash, street artist Slinkachu creates site-specific interventions of miniature people living just under our feet. More than just hiding tiny figurines in public places, each of his artworks are carefully considered, crafted, and installed before the artist takes a photo to document it. While clearly humorous in nature, Slinkachu’s pieces touch on much larger ideas of environment, globalization, and a culture of isolation often found in large cities. Via Andipa Gallery:

These figures embody the estrangement spurred by the over-whelming nature of the modern metropolis, and incite a renewed perspective of the everyday urban experience to those who find them. This sense of isolation and melancholy, however, is accompanied by sense of irony and humour that makes Slinkachu’s commentary all the more poignant.

You can see more of his little people artworks on Instagram and at Andipa Gallery. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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Reinvigorating Wroclaw’s Riverside With Site-Specific Chair Installations 

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All images via No Studio

Collaborative duo No Studio, comprised of Polish artists Magda Szwajcowska and Michal Majewski, have placed several architectural interventions in their native city of Wrocław in an attempt to repopulate an area that has become forgotten about and neglected. The project fits site-specific chairs onto concrete stairs that lead to the city’s river, bright blue furniture that also acts as loveseat sunbeds for passersby. The pieces are installed as a part of the DOFA 2016 Lowersilesian Festival of Architecture, which is comprised of works around this year’s slogan of “Spaces for Beauty.”

You can view more of No Studio’s miniature architectural works on their website. (via Designboom)

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