Photography

New Feathery Portraits That Peek Inside the Personalities of Cockatoos and Doves

October 4, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Superb Fruit Dove

Superb Fruit Dove

Photographer Leila Jeffreys (previously) captures birds outside of their traditional context, taking various breeds into her studio to photograph without distraction. The simple portraits capture the elegance of each bird, bringing a new perspective to the brilliant colors and textures that belong to each cockatoo, dove, or other domestic or exotic species. The works appear as both an unbiased attempts at documenting a set of animals, and a warm depiction of the feathery subjects. Each gives a peek into the personality of the bird on view, with a few casting solemn expressions, and one cockatoo showcasing what appears to be a wry smile.

Jeffreys has an upcoming exhibition of her portraits titled Ornithurae Volume 1 at Olsen Gruin Gallery in New York City on October 13. The exhibition will run through November 12, 2017. You can see more of her photographs on her website and Instagram.

Cyril Moluccan Cockatoo

Cyril Moluccan Cockatoo

Emerald Dove

Emerald Dove

New Guinea Ground Dove

New Guinea Ground Dove

Skye Red-Tailed Black Cockatoo

Skye Red-Tailed Black Cockatoo

 

 



Art

The Crystalline Busts of Massimiliano Pelletti

October 4, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Crystal Venus, 2017. Mexican onyx madre cava. 72 x 75 x 38 cm

Italian artist Massimiliano Pelletti works within a variety of materials including marble, bronze, and stone to carve elegant busts and human forms that evoke echoes of ancient sculpture while infusing each piece with a contemporary twist. Among his more intriguing works are figures carved from white onyx, where the rough crystalline edges are left largely intact as a juxtaposition to smoothly carved faces. Embracing the imperfect elements of his chosen mediums appears to be one of Peletti’s hallmarks, as he often accentuates or even highlights cracks or breaks in the rock.

Peletti lives and works in Pietrasanta, Italy where he attended the Stagio Stagi Art School. You can follow more of his work on Instagram and Artsy. (via Visual Fodder)

Crystal Dea, 2017. Mexican onyx madre cava. 90 x 40 x 60 cm

Crystal Boy, 2106. White Onyx. 45 x 40 x 60h cm

Crystal Venus, 2016. White Onyx. 56x40x61h cm

 

 



Design

Preserve Botanical Finds and Other Travel Specimens With This Unique Japanese Stationery

October 4, 2017

Johnny Strategy

Did you go anywhere fun and inspiring this summer? Did you wish you could share a piece of the experience with someone? Well now you can with this one-of-a kind mailing card that comes with a specimen window.

Share a piece of your travels—a leaf, a newspaper clipping, a flower petal, a tag, a ticket—by inserting the specimen between the plastic sheets to hold it in place. Add some text and your card transforms into a tiny museum dedicated to telling a story from your travels.

The card was designed by Tokyo-based illustrator Haruka Shinji, who knows a thing or two about traveling. She grew up in Seoul and Shanghai before moving to London for college. After graduating from Royal College of Art she moved back to Tokyo. Her idea for the card won an award in a paper card design competition, and was then produced by the Tokyo-based Fukunaga Print.

You can find the Preserve Your Travel Card in the Spoon & Tamago shop. (Synidcated from Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Art

Hilarious Kinetic Eye Sculptures by Lucas Zanotto

October 3, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

EYES is a short film by Lucas Zanotto (previously) showcasing several kinetic sculptures both built and filmed by the Helsinki-based director. Each installation is composed of simple parts that subtly imitate an action associated with one’s eyes. In one piece, two transparent globes slowly leak streams of water onto the floor below. In another, two black balls swing back and forth above an open book, slowly scanning the pages below. You can watch more of Zanotto’s videos on his Instagram and Vimeo, and take a look at all nine of his optical installations in the short piece above. Sound design by David Kamp.

 

 



Art

A Mountain of Nesting Heads at the Foot of the Alps by Andrea Casciu

October 3, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Artist Andrea Casciu just finished work on this crisp new mural of nesting blue heads titled “The Soul of the Mountain” in Pinerolo, Italy as part of the Street Alps festival. He says the work is a metaphor of sorts that represents our relationship to the mountains through various “realities” we each encounter there. You can follow more of his work on Instagram. (via StreetArtNews)

 

 



Animation Art Illustration

Transport Cats Across an Animated Countryside With Alexander Perrin’s Interactive Illustration ‘Short Trip’

September 29, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Short Trip is an interactive illustration by Australian artist Alexander Perrin. The meditative simulation places the player in the conductor’s seat of a cross-country train, allowing the user to use their arrow keys to go forwards or backwards through the game’s peaceful black and white countryside while delivering a series of animated cat passengers.

The illustrated simulation took Perrin five years to complete, from researching how a graphite-based drawing could be presented on a digital platform, to creating all the necessary components of the train’s journey by hand. His interest for this particular scenery came from riding on the Hakone Tozan Railway in Japan, one of his favorite ways of travel.

“It’s a magical, rickety switchback railway that ascends a forest shrouded mountain all throughout the year,” Perrin told Colossal. “There’s something about the beautifully crafted forms of the railway in sculpted union with the cliff faces and trees that just hits such a therapeutic, aesthetic sweet spot. It’s a little bit like riding an enlarged miniature railway, if you know what I mean. You remain passive and enjoy the ride for the sake of the journey.”

The game was built with this passiveness in mind, the only “goal” of the project to get to the other side of the railway while you enjoy the scenery and relaxing soundtrack of gentle bird chirping and cable car as it softly rumbles across the tracks. We recommend make the game full-screen with audio to get the full, tranquil experience of Short Trip.

You can watch a scene from an earlier game prototype by Perrin called Noirmittens in the video below, and see more clips from his current simulator on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Design

Anatomical Fish Zip Bags by Japanese Designer Keiko Otsuhata

September 29, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Japanese designer Keiko Otsuhata has brought a new dimension to the popularity of fish as food by turning the sea creature into a functional-out-of-water zip bag. In Japan, fried fish (especially mackerel) is often seen on bar menus, and is prepared by splitting the fish through its stomach and frying it flat. The sight of fried fish is common visual vocabulary in Japan, but Otsuhata was curious about what the fish looked like in its pre-fried state, so she bought one from the grocery store, took photographs, and made it into a zip bag.

Tokyo-based Otsuhata is also a writer for the Japanese website Daily Portal Z, where she often shares her creative process as she explores pop culture and humor. You can see how she made the original fish bag, as well as a pair of pigeon shoes.

Three varieties of Otsuhata’s fish bags—kinme, saury, and sea bream—are available in The Colossal Shop.