Tag Archives: installation

A Shimmering Mylar Wave Undulates Above Downtown LA 

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Spanning 15,000 square feet, the installation Liquid Shard subtly sways above downtown Los Angeles’s Pershing Square, a glittering band of what appears to be silver streamers. The piece, by Patrick Shearn of Poetic Kinetics, is actually composed of holographic mylar and monofilament, the materials which give the work its reflective quality.  As the two layers of the piece undulate with the wind they range from 15 to 115 feet off of the ground, creating a natural movement some have compared to swaying sea flora.

Shearn was inspired by humans’ collective observation of nature and the limited knowledge of what we see around us, which is why he intended the piece to be viewed from above as well as below. It is when things are zoomed in or slowed down that we begin to understand the workings of the plants and animals around us, and sense the movements that are imperceptible with our limited vision.

“Like fractals recurring progressively, we feel the currents of air on our skin but do not see the larger movements,” said Shearn. “I wanted to play in that realm with this technology I have been developing.”

The piece is part of an ongoing outdoor exhibition series curated NOW Art LA who worked on this particular project in collaboration with The City of Los Angeles Department of Recreation and ParksNOW Art LA, the AAV School, and Pershing Square. Liquid Shard will be remain on view until August 11, 2016.

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An Interactive Pond of Computer-Generated Koi Fish Designed by teamLab 

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Wading calf-deep into what looks like an infinite pool of water, visitors to Tokyo’s Odaiba Minna no YUME-TAIRIKU 2016 festival walk slowly through teamLab‘s (previously) latest light mapping installation. A shallow pool of water is completely surrounded by mirrored ceiling and walls, highlighting the psychedelic nature of the thousands of computer generated koi fish that are projected around the viewer’s feet. The fish change speeds as they navigate the waters, often crashing into observers and bursting into scattered flowers upon contact.

The interactive installation is one of four large-scale immersive experiences produced by the Japanese art collective for the festival which is on view through August 31, 2016. You can see images of the other installations on the festival’s website and watch the koi fish in action in a video produced by teamLab below. (via Culture N Lifestyle)

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Prismatic Paintings Produced From Refracted Light by Stephen Knapp 

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Stephen Knapp has been making work that is transformed by light for over thirty years, producing vibrant light installations he refers to as paintings. These large-scale works utilize minimal tools, harnessing simply light and dichroic glass to throw a multitude of colors against the walls and room. The installations are not sketched out beforehand or programmed by computer, but rather created during the installation process as Knapp moves intuitively to choreograph his intricate light patterns.

“The fun of what I do with light, is that there is nothing in our visual memory that prepares us for what I’m doing,” said Knapp in a short film about his work. “The fact that what I create can just be done with light, that there is no paint on these panels, is absolutely astounding to people. What I am trying to do most of all here is challenge any traditional notion of perception. What is it? Is it real? Is it not real? Does it matter?”

These works have been featured in solo exhibitions around the country including the Boise Art Museum, the Chrysler Museum of Art, the Naples Art Museum, the Butler Institute of American Art, and the Flint Institute of Art, among others. Knapp’s solo exhibition Lightpaintings is currently on view through August 27, 2016 at the Pensacola Museum of Art. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Artist Loris Cecchini Turns Gallery Walls into Vibrating Pools of Liquid 

In his ongoing series of relief sculptures titled “Wallwave Vibrations,” artist Loris Cecchini appears to liquify the walls of art galleries by turning them into pools of undulating waves caused by sound. Each piece is first digitally produced and then fabricated with polyester resin before being seamlessly applied to a flat surface. He remarks about the pieces:

In my most recent sculptures, the ‘Wallwave Vibrations’ series, one loses the element of the object proper. The concern for alteration is concerned more particularly with the physical manifestation of the vibrations, expressed each time with different frequencies and intensities, wherein the visual pattern becomes “echo” of a phenomenon like a succession of waves on a liquid surface. In this direction it is as if the architecture, or a portion of it, is modified by the relationship between the sculpture and the wall.

You can see much more of Cecchini’s organic and environment-influenced sculptures and installations on his website. (via Synaptic Stimuli, Juxtapoz)

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Levitating Clouds Provide a Dreamlike Resting Place During the Festival des Architectures Vives 

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Images by Paul Kozlowski

The Festival des Arcitectures Vives in Montpellier, France grants access to the courtyards of private hotels and other buildings typically restricted to the general public, filling these outdoor areas with installations that reflect the architecture that surrounds the temporary artworks. For the 2016 festival, the French collaborative duo Michaël Martins Afonso and Caroline Escaffre-Faure brought architecture’s universal backdrop down to eye level, floating several large clouds throughout one of the selected courtyards.

The project, which they have titled “Head in the Clouds,” provides a relaxing dreamland away from the bustling city, inviting attendees to sit or stand within the fluffy orbs. Although the symbolism of the piece is direct, the installation does provide a meditative area for those to take a step back and think, dream, or scheme amongst the hovering works.

You can see more images from this installation and the rest of the festival on the Festival des Architectures Vives’ Instagram. (via Designboom)

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The Lunar Cycle Displayed Through 15,000 Colorful Origami Birds 

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All images via Mathgoth Gallerie

Mademoiselle Maurice (previously here and here) recently produced the mural “The Lunar Cycle” in collaboration with the French Mathgoth Gallerie, a temporary piece that pays tribute to the hundreds of residents who were temporarily uprooted due to the upcoming demolition of the building. Composed of 15,000 colorful origami birds, the piece forms the cycles of the moon against the dark background of the wall and covers over 21,000 square feet of space—making it the largest urban mural ever created in Paris. Each origami is painted after folding using a solution deemed “Maurigami” by Mademoiselle Maurice, making the pieces nearly indestructible. You can see more of her original origami-based murals on her Instagram and Facebook. (via Faith is Torment)

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