Tag Archives: installation

A New Large-Scale Installation of Boats and Tangled Thread by Artist Chiharu Shiota 

All images, “Where are we going?” Installation by Chiharu Shiota at Le Bon Marché Rive Gauche, copyright Gabriel de la Chapelle

The newest installation by Chiharu Shiota (previously here and here) is composed of nearly 300,000 yards of white yarn, woven to encapsulate the center, ground floor, and ten windows of Le Bon Marché. The exhibition, titled Where are we going?, will feature 150 boats within the French department store’s center, and the ground-floor exhibition will house a giant threaded wave that visitors are encouraged to walk through. Despite boats being a common theme in Shiota’s work, this installation will mark the first time she has used white yarn, previously creating installations with only black or red thread.

The title of the exhibition, Where are we going?, refers to the mysterious destinations that pinpoint each of our individual and collective lives. Therefore the boats in this installation represent vessels sailing towards unknown locations, the works expressing both a sense of poetry and a sense of unease over what is to come.

“I am struck by the multiplicity of interactions that we experience every day, by their connections with the past and the future,” said Shiota in an interview with Le Bon Marché. “The creation of this indecipherable mesh and its plasticity are a mystery, just like our brain, the universe, and of course, life. I have no answers, only questions. These questions are the foundations of my work.”

Last year Le Bon Marché organized a large exhibition of Ai WeiWei's work which featured a 65-foot bamboo and silk dragon in the store’s atrium. Shiota’s Where are we going? will be displayed at Le Bon Marché through February 18, 2017. (via Fubiz)

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A Quarter Mile of Reflective Poles Mirror the Changing Tides 

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

A quarter mile installation of nearly 250 mirrored posts stood tall on California’s Laguna Beach coast, the work reflecting back the Pacific Ocean’s subtle changes for four days last November. 1/4 Mile Arc is the latest outdoor work by Phillip K Smith III, the Los Angeles born artist who previously built a reflective cabin within Joshua Tree’s expansive desert plains. 1/4 Mile Arc’s 10-foot poles were positioned to specifically mark the curve of the beach just beyond the high tide line, ensuring the work would reflect the waves it faced rather than being swallowed by their force.

The work was commissioned by the Laguna Art Museum for the fourth annual Art & Nature program from the 3rd to 6th of last November. You can watch Smith’s installation against the changing tides in a video by photographer Lance Gerber below. (via Dezeen)

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Eric Stoner, courtesy of Laguna Art Museum

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Vertigo-Inducing Room Illusions by Peter Kogler 

ING Art Center, Brussels, 2016. Photo by Vincent Everarts.

ING Art Center, Brussels, 2016. Photo by Vincent Everarts.

With dizzying wall graphics reminiscent of warped funhouse mirrors, artist Peter Kogler transforms ordinary galleries, transit centers, and lobbies into near hallucinatory experiences. For over 30 years, the Austrian artist has worked at the intersection of architecture and new media to construct both immersive environments and sculptural elements that seems to redefine physical spaces. By plastering walls with optical illusions he challenges a viewer’s sense of depth (and sanity) with his ambitious monochromatic installations of repeating patterns that incorporate pipes, ants, and bold snake-like patterns.

Kogler’s most recent pieces were on view at the ING Art Center in Brussels and at ERES-Stiftung in Munich earlier this year. You can see much more on his website.

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Sigmund Freud Museum, Schauraum, Wien, 2015. Photo courtesy Atelier Kogler.

Galerie im Taxispalais, Innsbruck, 2014. Photo by Atelier Kogler.

Galerie im Taxispalais, Innsbruck, 2014. Photo courtesy Atelier Kogler.

Galerie im Taxispalais, Innsbruck, 2014. Photo by Atelier Kogler.

Galerie im Taxispalais, Innsbruck, 2014. Photo by Atelier Kogler.

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MSU, museum of contemporary art Zagreb, 2014. Photo courtesy Atelier Kogler.

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DIRIMART Gallery, Istanbul, 2011. Photo courtesy Atelier Kogler.

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DIRIMART Gallery, Istanbul, 2011. Photo courtesy Atelier Kogler.

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Artist Benedetto Bufalino Unveils a Disco Ball Cement Truck 

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Thanks to French artist Benedetto Bufalino, you can now dance the night away at a construction site turned night club with the help of his new Diso Ball Cement Mixer. The truck was parked from December 8-10 in Lyon, France where bright spotlights pointed at the truck turned the streets and building facades into swirling dance party. The spectacle apparently grabbed the attention of quite a few passersby who stopped to take photos and film the otherwise mundane work site that was transformed for a few hours each night.

Bufalino is known for his unconventional approach to urban interventions, frequently installing active aquariums into phone booths and creating a variety of public art pieces in unexpected places. (via Designboom)

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Clusters of White Balloons Photographed Invading Landscapes and Homes by Charles Pétillon 

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Photographer Charles Pétillon (previously) captures arranged configurations of balloons in a variety of environments—trapping the illuminated organic shapes momentarily in his photographs. The huddles of balloons are metaphors for Pétillon, a nod to the objects, buildings, and structures we often pass by in our busy lives without taking the time to really notice them. Last year he produced a 177-foot-long installation for London’s Covent Garden, a work that he titled Heartbeat.

“Each balloon has its own dimensions and yet is part of a giant but fragile composition that creates a floating cloud above the energy of the market below,” explained Pétillon about his 2015 installation. “This fragility is represented by contrasting materials and also the whiteness of the balloons that move and pulse appearing as alive and vibrant as the area itself.”

Pétillon’s words can also be applied to his current oeuvre, a selection of which is currently on display in a solo exhibition titled Invasions. The works are featured at Magda Danysz Gallery in Paris through January 14, 2017, and also includes a site-specific installation of balloons to mirror those within his photographs. You can see a behind-the-scenes shoot below, as well as more final images of his balloon series on his website and Instagram. His work is also seen in the book Public Art Now.

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INVASIONS

SOUVENIRS DE FAMILLE

ANARCHITECTURES

FRAGILITE

CONVERSATIONS

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CLOUD COMPUTING

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A Public Park in Taipei Welded From Recycled Light Posts 

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From the mass of Taipei’s urban waste comes the project “Swings Park,” a public playground area constructed from dozens of unwanted lamp posts. The project is a collaboration between Taipei-based design studio City Yeast and Spanish art collective Basurma, two groups that aim to produce experimental design as positive activations for a city’s infrastructure and its residents. Fabricated in response to Design Capital 2016, the project was one of six selected proposals from the contest whose mission is to provoke urban evolution through public design.

The playground, located directly below one of the city’s busiest overpasses, is painted bright yellow—a way to break from the monotony of the surrounding architecture. In addition to swings built at four different heights, the structure also includes a multifunctional platform and two hammock-like nets, providing areas for both activity and respite.

“Swings Park” will be kept in its current location through 2017. You can learn more about Design Capital 2016’s selected proposals on their website. (via designboom, Popup City)

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