Tag Archives: installation

A Colorful Organic Blob Overtakes a 100-Year-Old Building Facade in Lodz 

lodz-1

Hyperbolic, 2016. Wire armature, rip-stop water proof and UV protective nylon, cable ties.

Artist Crystal Wagner just unveiled her latest site-specific installation titled “Hyperbolic” in Lodz, Poland, a piece that creates an unusual juxtaposition of an unwieldy organic growth against the backdrop of a 100-year-old art nouveau facade. Wagner is known for her large-scale mixed-media installations using a variety of materials like braided nylon, wire mesh, and cable ties that create colorful forms affixed to buildings or suspended from galleries. This latest work was created for the UNIQA Art Lodz project curated by Michal Biezynski.

You can see more of Wagner’s work on Instagram and at Hashimoto Contemporary. Hyperbolic will remain on view through December, 2016 and you can see more photos of it on StreetArtNews. (thnx, alley!)

lodz-2

lodz-3

lodz-4

lodz-5

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Floral Cross-Stitch Street Installations by Raquel Rodrigo 

stitch-5

stitch-8

Set designer and artist Raquel Rodrigo brings the macro details of cross-stitch embroidery to building facades around Madrid. Her colorful installations are prepared beforehand with enlarged cross-stitch techniques utilizing thick string wrapped on wire mesh before each is unrolled and affixed to a surface. The decorative pieces create a fun, pixelated texture that looks completely different close up versus at a distance. You can see much more here. (via Lustik)

stitch-1

stitch-2

stitch-3

stitch-4

stitch-6

stitch-7

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Uncertain Journey: A Flotilla of Wireframe Boats Overflow With a Dense Canopy of Red Yarn 

chiharu-shiota-uncertain-journey-2016-installation-view-courtesy-the-artist-and-blainsouthern-photo-christian-glaeser

Chiharu Shiota, Uncertain Journey, 2016, Installation view, Courtesy the artist and Blain|Southern, All photos by Christian Glaeser.

For her latest installation at Blain|Southern in Berlin, artist Chiharu Shiota has constructed a twisted network of tangled red yarn that rises from a collection of skeletal boats. Titled Uncertain Journey, the artwork envelopes the viewer by creating a blood-red canopy reminiscent of a neural network that meanders in every direction. The piece is a continuation of Shiota’s work with yarn, most notably her 2015 installation The Key in the Hand for the 56th Venice Art Biennale. Uncertain Journey will be on view starting September 17 through November 12, 2016. (via Designboom)

chiharu-shiota-uncertain-journey-2016-installation-view-courtesy-the-artist-and-blainsouthern-photo-christian-glaeser

chiharu-shiota-uncertain-journey-2016-installation-view-courtesy-the-artist-and-blainsouthern-photo-christian-glaeser

chiharu-shiota-uncertain-journey-2016-installation-view-courtesy-the-artist-and-blainsouthern-photo-christian-glaeser

chiharu-shiota-uncertain-journey-2016-installation-view-courtesy-the-artist-and-blainsouthern-photo-christian-glaeser

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Artist Liz West Captures a Rainbow Inside the Bristol Biennial 

LizWest_01

Liz West is no stranger to multi-colored environments, previously covering the floor of an historic UK church with dazzling reflective orbs. Her latest project, Our Colour, is located at this year’s Bristol Biennial and gives the audience the feeling of being dropped into the center of a rainbow by flooding a long hallway with a series of gel-filtered lights. The work changes from a deep violet to an ecstatic red, allowing one to traverse through an immersive collection of colors.

The installation was designed with a human’s psychological and emotional response to color in mind, as West consulted experts in human perception during the development of the work. While observing the audience’s reaction to the piece she has learned that often after traveling through the spectrum of colors they return to the color they find most comfortable—pausing a moment to absorb their favorite shade.

If slowly scrolling through this post isn’t enough to get the sensation that you are traveling through West’s rainbow-filled work, see the piece for yourself through September 10, 2016. (via Designboom)

LizWest_03

LizWest_02

LizWest_05

LizWest_06

LizWest_07

LizWest_10

LizWest_11

LizWest_13

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Artist Olek Covers a House in Finland with Pink Crochet 

pink-1

First a playground alligator, then an entire locomotive, and now artist Olek reveals an entire two-story house covered roof to floorboards in pink crochet. This new yarn-bombed installation currently stands in Kerava, Finland where Olek worked with a team of assistants to stitch together huge panels of crochet that envelop every inch of this 100-year-old house. Olek shares:

Originally, this building, built in the early 1900s, was the home of Karl Jacob Svensk (1883-1968). During the Winter War 1939-1940, the family fled to evade bombs falling into the yard, but they didn’t have to move out permanently. In 2015, more than 21 million people were forced to leave their homes in order to flee from conflicts. The pink house, our pink house is a symbol of a bright future filled with hope; is a symbol us coming together as a community.

You can see more photos and videos of the pink house on Instagram.

pink-2

pink-3

pink-4

pink-5

pink-6

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

A Shimmering Mylar Wave Undulates Above Downtown LA 

shard

LiquidShard_04

Spanning 15,000 square feet, the installation Liquid Shard subtly sways above downtown Los Angeles’s Pershing Square, a glittering band of what appears to be silver streamers. The piece, by Patrick Shearn of Poetic Kinetics, is actually composed of holographic mylar and monofilament, the materials which give the work its reflective quality.  As the two layers of the piece undulate with the wind they range from 15 to 115 feet off of the ground, creating a natural movement some have compared to swaying sea flora.

Shearn was inspired by humans’ collective observation of nature and the limited knowledge of what we see around us, which is why he intended the piece to be viewed from above as well as below. It is when things are zoomed in or slowed down that we begin to understand the workings of the plants and animals around us, and sense the movements that are imperceptible with our limited vision.

“Like fractals recurring progressively, we feel the currents of air on our skin but do not see the larger movements,” said Shearn. “I wanted to play in that realm with this technology I have been developing.”

The piece is part of an ongoing outdoor exhibition series curated NOW Art LA who worked on this particular project in collaboration with The City of Los Angeles Department of Recreation and ParksNOW Art LA, the AAV School, and Pershing Square. Liquid Shard will be remain on view until August 11, 2016.

LiquidShard_03

LiquidShard_02

LiquidShard_01

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 1 of 681234...»