installation

Posts tagged
with installation



Art Design Science

Artist Philip Beesley Merges Chemistry, Artificial Intelligence, and Interactivity to Create “Living” Architecture

December 8, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Astrocyte, 2017. All images by Philip Beesley and Alex Willms / PBAI.

Multidisciplinary artist and architect Philip Beesley weaves together such a broad array of technologies and systems in his artworks that they legitimately defy description, but the immediate impact of encountering these sprawling interactive installations is visceral and awe-inspiring. His latest work, Astrocyte, connects chemistry, artificial intelligence, and an immersive soundscape to create a living piece of architecture that responds to the presence of viewers. Comprised of 300,000 individual components, the piece was on view against the industrial backdrop at Toronto’s port lands for EDIT: Expo for Design, Innovation & Technology last October. From a statement about the project:

The structure is made up of resilient, lightweight meshworks of thermally formed acrylic, laser-cut into geometrical patterns optimized for production with minimal waste. This unique space truss system is part of the Living Architecture Systems’ pioneering research into resilient and adaptable structures. Astrocyte’s structural mesh components use overlapping strands of material in doubly-curved conical forms that achieve extraordinary strength from minimal material. These innovative forms are clustered together in bundles that are similar to the multiple filaments spanning between outer and inner shells of natural bone structures.

The piece further incorporates 3D-printed lighting components and masses of custom glasswork that contain a combination of oil, inorganic chemicals, and other solutions to form a sort of chemical skin. At the core of Beesley research is the question of whether architecture can truly be “alive,” opening the possibility for self-repairing structures or deeply responsive organic environments, where artificial intelligence exists at almost every level of design. Regardless of the complexity and heady ideas, the works are deeply aesthetically intriguing, something directly out of science fiction.

Beesley is the director of the Living Architecture Systems Group and a professor at the School of Architecture at the University of Waterloo. You can explore much more of his work on his website and along with several videos and interviews on Vimeo. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

Danish Street Art Project Has Built Over 3,500 Urban Bird Houses Since 2006

November 22, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist and designer Thomas Dambo (previously) specializes in building family-friendly installations from upcycled materials. One of Dambo’s many interactive projects is Happy City Birds, a ongoing series that lies at the intersection of street art and community development. The Danish artist builds bird houses across urban centers, installing the new homes against buildings, grouped on tall poles, or spaced throughout existing trees.

Since 2006, Dambo and his crew have constructed more than 3,500 birdhouses with recycled wood and paint. Although a large percentage of his works are concentrated in Arken (you can see a Google map of the bird house locations here), many more of them can be found dotting Copenhagen, Aarhus, Odense, Horsens, Beirut, and Berlin. You can see more of Dambo’s bird houses, including this human-size build, and a collection of camoflauged homes, on Dambo’s website.

 

 



Art

Bordalo II Opens the Doors to ‘Attero,’ a Giant Exhibition of Animal Assemblages Built with Trash

November 17, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Within the confines of an abandoned warehouse in Lisbon, artist Bordalo II just opened the doors to his largest body of work to date, dozens of animalistic assemblages comprised of his trademark medium: trash. Using locally-sourced waste plastics, car parts, construction materials, and other found detritus, Bordalo has become famous for his uncanny depictions of animals—those most vulnerable to the side effects of our disposable economy. While scale often plays a large role in his outdoor wall-mounted street pieces, the artist also created considerably smaller assemblages attached to old doors, siding, and windowpanes.

“Whether on a large or small scale, his unusual sculptural creations oblige us to question and rethink our own role as actors in this static, consumerist and self-destructive society, which exploits, often in an abusive way, the resources that nature offers us,” shares Attero curator Lara Seixo Rodrigues.

With well over 8,000 visitors in its first week, Attero (Latin for waste) opened on November 4, 2017 and runs through November 26. You can see many more photos on Facebook and Instagram.

 

 



Design

Plant Party: A Greenhouse in Tokyo Bursts Into a Dazzling Light Show When You Touch the Plants Inside

October 24, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

An illuminated greenhouse fills Tokyo Midtown’s garden space, encouraging visitors to touch the variety of vegetables that grow inside. The functional plant shelter was created by design studio PARTY for the city’s 2017 Design Touch event, a month-long festival that focuses on the experiential elements of good design.

Each plant in the Digital Vegetables installation is rigged to trigger a symphony of light and sound when touched. Each color and noise reflect a specific aspect of the plant, allowing the visitor to connect to the organic matter with senses that lay outside of taste or smell.

“Sounds of rubbing seeds. Sounds of touching leaves. Sounds of eating fruits,” says Digital Vegetables’ Sound Designer Ray Kunimoto. “I recorded the sounds created with actual vegetables. Then, I mixed them with the sounds of orchestra instruments on the computer to make 7 melodies.”

Kunimoto’s technique makes sure there is a unique sound for each. When visitors touch a tomato they will hear the sound of a violin, carrots will trigger trumpets, and cabbages will activate the deep sounds of the oboe.

The installation is free, and will be displayed in Tokyo Midtown through November 5th, 2017. You can see the greenhouse in action in a short video of Digital Vegetables below. (via Spoon&Tamago)

 

 



Art

Everyday Plastic Objects Fill a Scottish Greenhouse With Faux Flora

September 13, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Swiss/Danish art duo PUTPUT creates conceptual still life photography and sculptures, infusing humor into their minimal works. In their 2015 project Fruitless, the Copenhagen-based pair turned a greenhouse on-site at Lust and the Apple Gallery in Temple, Scotland into a florescent green paradise. The two artists subbed cacti and other succulents for everyday plastic objects found around the house, instead “planting” gloves, combs, and plastic cups in real terra cotta pots.

Because the plastic forms closely imitate plants found in nature, the faux flora seem full of life in the unique context, glowing more brightly than their typical place on a shelf or counter. You can see more of the pair’s non-functional arrangements and sculptures on their Facebook and Instagram. (via DesignBoom)

 

 



Art

Michael Pederson’s Lighthearted Street Art is Hidden in Plain Sight

September 11, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Using the nom de guerre Miguel Marquez Outside, Michael Pederson (previously here and here) tucks art installations in unexpected locations around Sydney. The artist’s plaques, signs, and miniature architecture tend to center around ideas of escape, isolation, and our relationship to social norms. But he approaches these heavy subjects with a a sense of humor and brings a lighthearted pseudohistory to various structures and spaces. And if Pederson’s shovel piece, shown below, has you wondering, you can use this site to find out what location is on the opposite side of the world from you. See more of the artist’s work on Instagram.

 

 

 



Art Photography

Surreal Book and Lamp Installations by Rune Guneriussen Illuminate Norway’s Forests

September 7, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

At no time defeat sunrise, 2014

At no time defeat sunrise, 2014

Norwegian artist Rune Guneriussen (previously here and here) moves elements of domestic life into the outdoors, producing large installations built from books, lamps, and other displaced objects. His works are placed in remote areas of Norway’s forest, and either balance precariously in a selected location or illuminate a particular patch of the surrounding wooded environment.

“It is not as much photography as it is about sculpture and installation,” says Guneriussen in an artist statement. “…This process involves the object, story, space and most important the time it is made within. It is an approach to the balance between nature and human culture, and all the sublevels of our own existence.”

You can see more images from the conceptual artist’s outdoor installation series, which date back to 2005, on his website and Facebook. (via Ignant)

Protest art on separation, 2014

Protest art on separation, 2014

A plague on my stem, 2013

A plague on my stem, 2013

Discipline considered an option, 2012

Discipline considered an option, 2012

Globe clustered confluence, 2013

Globe clustered confluence, 2013

When man leaves men behind, 2013

When man leaves men behind, 2013

A 15-minute title, 2013

A 15-minute title, 2013

The heirs motivational speech, 2013

The heirs motivational speech, 2013

The beauty of the elderly, 2013

The beauty of the elderly, 2013

 

Acknowledge a new found grace, 2013

Acknowledge a new found grace, 2013

Accurate elliptical discourse, 2013

Accurate elliptical discourse, 2013

A finalized independent time, 2013

A finalized independent time, 2013