Tag Archives: installation

Tens of Thousands of Metallic Lawn Ornaments Glisten Inside Nick Cave’s Monumental Installation at MASS MoCA 

Nick Cave, “Until” (2016), all images courtesy of MASS MoCA and the artist.

Composed from tens of thousands of metallic wind spinners, more than 10 miles of crystals, and thousands of other traditional lawn decorations is Nick Cave's installation Until, a work which exists at two levels within the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art's (MASS MoCA) football field-sized exhibition space, Building 5. Illuminated chandeliers peek from within dense clouds of dangling crystals hung from the building’s rafters a story and a half above the floor. Several bright yellow ladders lead to the top of these glistening structures, showcasing crowded platforms that serve as home to dozens of ceramic birds, gilded pigs, colorful flora, and cast iron lawn jockeys.

Collecting the enormous supply of lawn ornaments and decorations for the exhibition was a collaboration between Cave and MASS MoCA. A team of several individuals scoured eBay, thrift stores, and other second hand shops to find previously used materials that would be perfect for the towering installation. The thousands of found objects create a textured experience, one viewing his cloud-like platforms through mirrored kinetic objects. Not all inclusions are intended to dazzle however, as scattered images of guns, bullets, and targets lay within the comforting imagery of opulence and kitsch.

“Formally their [the metallic wind spinners’] reflective quality was important,” Cave shares with Colossal. “To have something that we can see ourselves within as well as something that becomes almost mirage-like. Conceptually, garden spinners are found in our own back yards, so using these everyday objects with images of guns, teardrops and bullets conveys the proliferation of this violence in and around the safety of our homes.”

Cave, an artist best known for his elaborately produced Soundsuits, created the installation as a response to gun violence and policies and race relations in America. The title, Until, sits at the center of two phrases. The first, which lays at the heart of our judicial system, “innocent until proven guilty,” and the second phrase, which is seen to be more commonly practiced, “guilty until proven innocent.”

Cave hopes the exhibition serves a catalyst for these topics to be more readily discussed, as well as a space for change to be motivated. During the run of Until he invited several dancers, singers, poets, and composers to perform their own messages within the work, allowing the visual exhibition to double as a rotating stage.

“By inviting other artists and community members to make their own work within it, the installation becomes a platform for their work and their audiences,” said Cave. “Their particular of sharing their view on the subject may strike a different or more specific chord in some and as such the whole project becomes more effective and reaches more people. This is in service to all of our goals. I also learn from their works the role of my own work.”

A nearly 200-page book centered around the exhibition, Nick Cave: Until which is published by Prestel, will be released on April 28 at MASS MoCA, featuring installation images as well as essays by MASS MoCA curator Denise Markonish, Talking Heads co-founder David Byrne, and Cave himself. It will also feature poetry centered around the justice system by Claudia Rankine and reflections by the head of the Police Board and Task Force on Police Accountability in Chicago, Lori Lightfoot.

The book is available for pre-order on MASS MoCA’s website and Amazon, and can be found in the museum later this month. There will be a book launch in NYC on April 26 at the New York Pubic Library and one at MASS MoCA on April 28. You can visit the monumental exhibition at MASS MoCA through August 2017. Until will then travel to Carriageworks in Sydney in 2018, and the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, AR in 2019.

     

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People I Saw But Never Met: Thousands of Miniature Metal Figurines by Zadok Ben-David 

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017, detail. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

Taking notice of the countless people we witness as a backdrop to our daily lives seems like an impossible task, but for artist Zadok Ben-David (previously) this myriad of anonymous people form the basis of his installation People I Saw But Never Met. Comprised of over 3,000 chemically etched miniature figures displayed at varying proportions, each individual is pulled from photographs taken by Ben-David during his travels across Europe, the United States, Central Asia, Australia, and Antarctica, creating a diverse assemblage of various cultures and people.

Shown individually, the two-dimensional sketch-like sculptures seem to depict the mundane moments in the lives of average citizens, tourists, and even pets, but viewed collectively the installation offers a unique snapshot of humanity at a certain moment in time. “Ben-David’s sculptural milieu comes at a critical point in our current socio-political climate,” says Shoshana Wayne Gallery, “where heated debates about exclusion and borders versus inclusivity and multiplicity are part of our daily experience.”

People I Saw But Never Met has been installed in various configurations since 2015 and is currently on view at Shoshana Wayne Gallery in Santa Monica through May 27, 2017. This new installation incorporates thousands of smaller figures along with 45 much larger hand-cut aluminum figures installed in a large gallery space. You can see more views here. (via Design Milk)

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2015, detail.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2015, detail.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017, detail. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017, detail. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017, detail. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017, detail. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

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Ephemeral Rugs Formed From Oklahoma’s Red Earth by Rena Detrixhe 

Oklahoma-based artist Rena Detrixhe creates installations from finely sifted dirt, ephemeral rugs that she stamps with ornate patterns. The dirt used for the works is collected by hand from her surrounding Oklahoma landscape, bringing an important context to the earth-based faux textiles.

“This rich red earth is the land of the dust bowl, the end of the Trail of Tears, land runs and pipelines, deep fault-lines and hydraulic fracturing,” said Detrixhe in her artist statement. “There is immense beauty and pride in this place and also profound sorrow. The refining and sifting of the soil and the imprinting of the pattern is a meditation on this past, a gesture of sensitivity, and the desire for understanding. It is a meticulous and solitary act.”

By using this fleeting form Detrixhe questions the permanent decisions that have been made to the region’s environment. One of her red dirt rugs is currently a part of the group exhibition Shifting Landscapes at Form & Concept in Santa Fe, New Mexico through May 20, 2017. You can view a time-lapse video of Detrixhe installing one of her rugs in the video below. (via Colossal Submissions)

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A Rainbow of Tape Cascades Through a Six-Story Atrium in Sydney 

“A million things that make your head spin,” 2016-2017. Flagging tape, wood, paint, and hardware. 51.4 x 27.5 x 84.8 feet / 15.67 x 8.37 x 25.85 meters

LA-based artist Megan Geckler recently completed work on her latest multi-colored tape installation inside the 6-story atrium of the historic Customs House building in Sydney. The suspended artwork titled “A million things that make your head spin” was produced with 14 kilometers (46,000 feet) of flagging tape with the help of several volunteers. Like a swirling tornado of color, the piece dominates the interior space of the building utilized as a cultural hub located in the city’s Circular Quay area. The installation will be on view through April 30, 2017. You can see more of Geckler’s work in her online portfolio and watch a behind-the-scenes video below.

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Mirage: A Suburban American House Retrofitted with Mirrors Reflects the Mountainous California Desert 

Desert X installation view of Doug Aitken, MIRAGE. 2017. All photos by Lance Gerber unless otherwise noted. Courtesy the artist and Desert X.

Perched at the juncture where the San Jacinto mountains open into the Coachella valley in California, artist Doug Aitken has erected a ranch-style suburban home covered entirely in mirrors. Titled Mirage, the house appears like an inverted kaleidoscope, reflecting everything from the sky above to the surrounding mountainous desert, not to mention visitors themselves. The structure was created as part of Desert X, an outdoor art exhibition comprised of pieces by over 15 artists that remains on view through April 30, 2017. Mirage will remain up a bit longer through October 31, but has somewhat irregular hours so be sure to check the schedule before visiting.

#DesertX

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Street Kintsugi: Artist Rachel Sussman Repairs the Roads with Gold 

“Study for Sidewalk Kintsukuroi #01 (New Haven, Connecticut),” photograph with enamel paint and metallic dust.

As part of an ongoing series titled Sidewalk Kintsukuroi, artist Rachel Sussman (previously) brings the Japanese art of kintsugi to the streets. We’ve long been enamored by the ancient technique that traditionally involves the process of fixing broken pottery with a lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold, resulting in an a repair that pays homage to the object’s history. In the same way, Sussman’s kintsugi series highlights the history under our feet, bringing attention to the imperceptible changes that take place over time in the world around us. Though even the repairs are impermanent and will eventually be lost to wear and tear.

Several photos from Sidewalk Kintsukuroi are currently on view as part of the Alchemy: Transformations in Gold at the Des Moines Art Center through through May 5, 2017. (via Hyperallergic)

“Study for Sidewalk Kintsukuroi #09 (SoHo, New York),” photograph with enamel paint and metallic dust.

“Study for Sidewalk Kintsukuroi #02 (MASS MoCA),” photograph with enamel paint and metallic dust

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