Tag Archives: installation

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by ‘We Make Carpets’

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Exhibition view of “Kneeling: Five years of WE MAKE CARPETS”

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Exhibition view of “Kneeling: Five years of WE MAKE CARPETS”

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Exhibition view of “Kneeling: Five years of WE MAKE CARPETS”

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Skewer Carpet

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Skewer Carpet, detail

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Crayon Carpet (2013) was built from 16,000 colored crayons

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Fork Carpet (2010)

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

detail of Fork Carpet (2010)

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Firework Carpet (2014)

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Pasta Carpet

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Exhibition view of “Kneeling: Five years of WE MAKE CARPETS”

Intricate Temporary Carpets Made from Everyday Objects by We Make Carpets multiples installation carpets

Disposable Carpet

It’s not hard to imagine what Dutch design trio We Make Carpets, makes. True to their name, Marcia Nolte, Stijn van der Vleuten and Bob Waardenburg create carpets, but not they kind you’re thinking of. Mixing traditional pattern making with a critical view of consumer society, the group creates unusual carpets using everything from crayons and fireworks to cocktail umbrellas, plastic forks and dried pasta. From a distance we simply see a decorative carpet. But upon closer inspection the meticulously assorted collection of dense materials reveal themselves.

We Make Carpets is currently celebrating 5 years and 50 different carpets with an exhibition at mu in Eindhoven. “Kneeling: Five years of WE MAKE CARPETS” is going on through October 26, 2014. You can see much more of these big and small temporary carpets on the artist’s website.

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Mixed Media Aquarium Sculptures by Mariele Neudecker Mimic Paintings and Photographs

Mixed Media Aquarium Sculptures by Mariele Neudecker Mimic Paintings and Photographs  sculpture installation aquariums
Things Can Change in a Day, 2001. Mixed media incl. water, acrylic medium, salt, fibreglass. 68 x 56 x 57cm. Photo by Alex Ramsay.

Mixed Media Aquarium Sculptures by Mariele Neudecker Mimic Paintings and Photographs  sculpture installation aquariums
Things Can Change in a Day, 2001. Mixed media incl. water, acrylic medium, salt, fibreglass. 68 x 56 x 57cm. Photo by Alex Ramsay.

Mixed Media Aquarium Sculptures by Mariele Neudecker Mimic Paintings and Photographs  sculpture installation aquariums
Things Can Change in a Day, 2001. Mixed media incl. water, acrylic medium, salt, fibreglass. 68 x 56 x 57cm

Mixed Media Aquarium Sculptures by Mariele Neudecker Mimic Paintings and Photographs  sculpture installation aquariums
I Don’t Know How I Resisted the Urge to Run, 1998. Mixed media incl. water, acrylic medium, salt, fibreglass/ 75 x 90 x 61cm

Mixed Media Aquarium Sculptures by Mariele Neudecker Mimic Paintings and Photographs  sculpture installation aquariums
Stolen Sunsets, 1996

Mixed Media Aquarium Sculptures by Mariele Neudecker Mimic Paintings and Photographs  sculpture installation aquariums
Ship, 1998. Glass tank, water, food dye, salt, fibre-glass, model ship. 64.5cm x 70.5cm x 177cm

In a fascinating blend of chemistry and sculpture, artist Mariele Neudecker builds three dimensional images contained within large aquariums, an ongoing series she refers to as “Tank Works.” Starting with source materials that include romantic paintings and photographs, Neudecker creates environments that attempt to interpret the 2D imagery in three dimensional space. The representational pieces are contained entirely within glass tanks filled to the brim with water that also contain fiberglass mountains, model ships, and other sculptural objects. She also adds chemicals that provide an element of atmosphere while also forming a sort of contained climate that changes gradually over the course of days, weeks, and months.

While primarily a sculptor Neudecker also works with film, video, and installation, much more of which you can see on her website. She discuss her tank works a bit more in this 2009 interview with CAFKATV.

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The First Law of Kipple: An Entire Floor Filled With Chromatically Arranged Junk by Dan Tobin Smith

The First Law of Kipple: An Entire Floor Filled With Chromatically Arranged Junk by Dan Tobin Smith  trash installation

The First Law of Kipple: An Entire Floor Filled With Chromatically Arranged Junk by Dan Tobin Smith  trash installation

The First Law of Kipple: An Entire Floor Filled With Chromatically Arranged Junk by Dan Tobin Smith  trash installation

The First Law of Kipple: An Entire Floor Filled With Chromatically Arranged Junk by Dan Tobin Smith  trash installation

The First Law of Kipple: An Entire Floor Filled With Chromatically Arranged Junk by Dan Tobin Smith  trash installation

The First Law of Kipple: An Entire Floor Filled With Chromatically Arranged Junk by Dan Tobin Smith  trash installation

The First Law of Kipple: An Entire Floor Filled With Chromatically Arranged Junk by Dan Tobin Smith  trash installation

The First Law of Kipple: An Entire Floor Filled With Chromatically Arranged Junk by Dan Tobin Smith  trash installation

About 3 months ago photographer Dan Tobin Smith set up a website to ask the public to donate kipple: junk that was lying around their house. “It’s time to free yourself of the pointless or unused objects in your life,” read the plea. “Give them a purpose as part of Dan Tobin Smith’s installation for the London Design Festival 2014.”

Sure enough, the donations began coming in and in no time at all Smith had enough junk on his hands to create a sprawling installation that filled an entire floor and mezzanine, “carpeting 200-square-metres with a dense, precise, chromatically-themed arrangement of thousands of objects.” The objects are so carefully placed that gradients seem to blend together seamlessly.

The fictional word Kipple was coined by science fiction writer Philip K Dick. Kipple appears in his 1968 novel “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep” (the film adaptation was Blade Runner) and is used to describe useless, pointless stuff that humans accumulate. It served as the inspiration for Smith’s installation “The First Law of Kipple,” which was part of London Design Festival this month. (via Creative Review)

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Artist ‘Bordalo II’ Brings Trash and Found Objects to Life on the Streets of Lisbon

Artist Bordalo II Brings Trash and Found Objects to Life on the Streets of Lisbon trash street art installation insects animals

Artist Bordalo II Brings Trash and Found Objects to Life on the Streets of Lisbon trash street art installation insects animals

Artist Bordalo II Brings Trash and Found Objects to Life on the Streets of Lisbon trash street art installation insects animals

Artist Bordalo II Brings Trash and Found Objects to Life on the Streets of Lisbon trash street art installation insects animals

Artist Bordalo II Brings Trash and Found Objects to Life on the Streets of Lisbon trash street art installation insects animals

Artist Bordalo II Brings Trash and Found Objects to Life on the Streets of Lisbon trash street art installation insects animals

For the past few months Portuguese artist Bordalo II (previously) has been stalking the streets of Lisbon looking for heaps of trash. Using mounds of discarded plastic sheeting, old tires, shingles, and tangles of electrical cable, he carefully repositions everything before spray painting it to resemble animals and insects. You can see more from the ongoing series on Facebook.

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Florentijn Hofman’s Latest Work is a Gigantic Bunny Gazing Up at the Moon in Taiwan

Florentijn Hofman’s Latest Work is a Gigantic Bunny Gazing Up at the Moon in Taiwan  Taiwan rabbits installation animals

Florentijn Hofman’s Latest Work is a Gigantic Bunny Gazing Up at the Moon in Taiwan  Taiwan rabbits installation animals

Florentijn Hofman’s Latest Work is a Gigantic Bunny Gazing Up at the Moon in Taiwan  Taiwan rabbits installation animals

Florentijn Hofman’s Latest Work is a Gigantic Bunny Gazing Up at the Moon in Taiwan  Taiwan rabbits installation animals

Florentijn Hofman’s Latest Work is a Gigantic Bunny Gazing Up at the Moon in Taiwan  Taiwan rabbits installation animals

Florentijn Hofman’s Latest Work is a Gigantic Bunny Gazing Up at the Moon in Taiwan  Taiwan rabbits installation animals

Florentijn Hofman’s Latest Work is a Gigantic Bunny Gazing Up at the Moon in Taiwan  Taiwan rabbits installation animals

Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman, known for his large scale installations of animal characters, recently unveiled his latest work. Located at the Dayuan Town Naval Base in Taiwan, “Moon Rabbit” is an enormous yet adorable bunny that’s propped up against a grassy military bunker gazing up at the moon. To create the large-scale work, which is based on the East Asian folklore about a rabbit that lives on the moon, Hofman first created a wood and Styrofoam frame. And to achieve the fluffiness but also keep it weather-resistant the artist used over 12,000 sheets of Tyvek paper, a material normally reserved for home builders. Unfortunately, the bunny caught fire earlier today as workers were trying to disassemble it. But its counterpart can still be seen on the moon, or at least that’s how the story goes. (via Street Art News)

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Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Geometric Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood sculpture reflection light installation glass geometric

Artist Chris Wood works with colored glass to create colorful, prism-like mazes and mandalas of light installed vertically on walls. Her most common material is dichroic (meaning ‘two color’) glass, a material invented by NASA in the 1950s that has a special optical coating meant to reflect certain wavelengths of light while letting others through. At some angles the glass appears completely reflective, somewhat like a mirror of gold. Wood has constructed a number of different glass, mirror, and other light installations which have been carefully documented on her website. (via My Modern Met)

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A Brain-Like Building Turned into a Twisting Video Mapping Light Show

A Brain Like Building Turned into a Twisting Video Mapping Light Show video art projection installation architecture

A Brain Like Building Turned into a Twisting Video Mapping Light Show video art projection installation architecture

A Brain Like Building Turned into a Twisting Video Mapping Light Show video art projection installation architecture

A Brain Like Building Turned into a Twisting Video Mapping Light Show video art projection installation architecture

A Brain Like Building Turned into a Twisting Video Mapping Light Show video art projection installation architecture
Nikola Lenivets

A Brain Like Building Turned into a Twisting Video Mapping Light Show video art projection installation architecture
Nikola Lenivets

As part of the New Media Night Festival last month at Moscow’s Nikola-Lenivets Art Park, one of the most unusual video-mapping projects we’ve seen took place against the backdrop of Nikolay Polissky’s (previously) brain-like Universe Mind structure. The twisting, serpentine building has been used for years as a centerpiece to many events at the art park which now boasts a collection of almost 30 architecturally-influenced artworks, including a 170-foot trampoline installed in the middle of a forest.

For this year’s New Media Night Festival, media design studio Radugadesign was comissioned to set ‘Universe Mind’ in motion with this 8-minute video projection. If you’d like to get a feel for what it’s like to step inside the building under normal circumstances, check out this interactive 360° panorama. (via The Creator’s Project)

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