Tag Archives: installation

A Mass of Tangled Red Yarn Unravels from a Loom to Overtake a Brazilian Chapel 


Tatiana Blass, “Penelope” (2011), carpet loom, wool yarn, chenille at the Chapel of Morumbi. Photos by Everton Ballardin

In 2011, Brazilian artist Tatiana Blass pierced the walls of a Sao Paulo chapel with large masses of red yarn, letting the bright material trail into the surrounding grasses, landscape, and trees. The installation, titled Penelope, was named after Odysseus’s wife in Homer’s Odyssey, a character who kept herself away from suitors while he was at war by weaving a burial shroud by day, and secretly taking pieces of it apart at night.

Inside the chapel the work continued with a 45-foot-long carpet leading to a loom into which it was stuck. Immaculate on one side of the loom and in pieces on the other, strings of the dismantled rug traveled outside of the chapel through preexisting holes that made their way into the yard. The piece, just like the epic poem, leaves us to wonder whether the work is in a state of construction or unraveling, if the carpet is being built, or slowly torn apart. (via Design Milk)







Penelope, before and after 6 months

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A Temporary Lawn Planted Amongst a Patchwork of Persian Rugs 



Tending to his work like a garden, New York-based Austrian artist Martin Roth grows grass within the fibers of Persian rugs, constantly watering his works to ensure the grass grows lush from within the dense fabric. The end result of this project, first exhibited at an Austrian castle in 2012, will always be the same. The rugs will unravel and the grass will die. This fatalistic act is both poetic and political for the artist, working with a sensual ephemerality as well as speaking to Western countries’ urges to bring their values to other countries.

Roth’s most recent rug installation is currently on view at the Korean Cultural Centre in London as a part of a show titled Riptide that features the work of Koo Jeong A and other artists. Over the next few weeks the piece will gradually change as the grass first mimics the patterns found on the rugs until it grows to create new forms. Towards the end of the exhibition the grass will nearly consume the rugs before dying itself, a cycle of birth, consumption, and eventual death.

You can witness the collaboration between rug and lawn from now until November 19, 2016. See more of Roth’s installation-based interventions on his website.









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Artist Thomas Jackson Suspends Swarms of Objects Mid-Air for His “Emergent Behavior” Series 

Cups no. 3, Novato, California, 2014

Cups no. 3, Novato, California, 2014

Photographer Thomas Jackson (previously) is intrigued by the movements and behaviors of swarms, something he seeks to replicate in temporary installations he constructs for the purpose of making a single photo as part of his Emergent Behavior series. From swarming locusts, to schools of fish or flocks of birds, the San Francisco-based artist recreates these self-organizing behaviors with common objects like plastic cups, party streamers, or hula hoops. Each piece is made as seen here using various methods of filament and other hidden structures that hold everything in place for the photograph—nothing is digitally edited and the pieces aren’t being thrown through the air. From his statement about the project:

The images attempt to tap the mixture of fear and fascination that those phenomena tend to evoke, while creating an uneasy interplay between the natural and the manufactured and the real and the imaginary. At the same time, each image is an experiment in juxtaposition. By constructing the installations from unexpected materials and placing them where they seem least to belong, I aim to tweak the margins of our visual vocabulary, and to invite fresh interpretations of everyday things.

Jackson will be showing many images from Emergent Behavior at Miller Yezerski Gallery in Boston starting November 18, 2016.


Party Streamers no. 2, Tumey Hills, California, 2015

Balloons no. 1, Pescadero, California, 2016

Balloons no. 1, Pescadero, California, 2016

Hula Hoops no. 1, Lee Vining, California, 2015

Hula Hoops no. 1, Lee Vining, California, 2015

Hula Hoops no. 2, Montara, California, 2016

Hula Hoops no. 2, Montara, California, 2016

Glow Necklaces no. 2, Pescadero, California, 2016

Glow Necklaces no. 2, Pescadero, California, 2016

Straws no. 3, San Francisco, California, 2015

Straws no. 3, San Francisco, California, 2015

Take Out Containers no. 1, Montara, California, 2016

Take Out Containers no. 1, Montara, California, 2016

Tutus no. 1, Montara, California, 2016

Tutus no. 1, Montara, California, 2016

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A Virtual Reality Sky Projected Above a Parisian Church by Artist Miguel Chevalier 


Projected onto the ceiling of Saint-Eustache Church in Paris, Voûtes Célestes is a work by Miguel Chevalier that turned the ancient chapel into the backdrop for a constantly morphing sky chart produced in real time. Cycling through 35 different colored networks, the ceiling glowed with each successive pattern, highlighting the grand architecture that laid below the swirling universes above.

The work, accompanied by musical improvisations played by Baptiste-Florian Marle-Ouvrard on the organ, was produced for Nuit Blanche 2016 on the first of October. Visitors to the virtual reality artwork were invited to wander or lie down beneath the false sky above, aesthetically immersed in a wash of sonic and visual splendor.

Chevalier was born in Mexico City in 1959 and has lived in Paris since 1985. His work has focused almost exclusively on the digital since the late 1970s, often combining themes such as nature and artifice. You can see a more of his work on his website, and a video of his Paris installation below. (via designboom)








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A Skeleton of Found Roots and Tree Limbs Heralds the Beginning of Fall in Italy 


In this 2012 installation, street artist Never2501 assembled a variety of found vegetation to form an eerie skeleton at the base of some steps in the idyllic gardens of the Museo Archeologico Paolo Giovio in Como, Italy. The piece was titled “In Cammino Per Trasformarsi Nell’istante Presente” (Moving to Transform into the Present) and could be interpreted as a harbinger of the seasons with the decaying root stumps and limbs pulled from a nearby forest, fit together without aid of any additional materials. Or maybe it’s just an incredibly disturbing thing to stumble onto when walking through the woods? You can see more photos of the temporary piece here, and follow Never2501’s more recent work on Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness, StreetArtNews)



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A Colorful Organic Blob Overtakes a 100-Year-Old Building Facade in Lodz 


Hyperbolic, 2016. Wire armature, rip-stop water proof and UV protective nylon, cable ties.

Artist Crystal Wagner just unveiled her latest site-specific installation titled “Hyperbolic” in Lodz, Poland, a piece that creates an unusual juxtaposition of an unwieldy organic growth against the backdrop of a 100-year-old art nouveau facade. Wagner is known for her large-scale mixed-media installations using a variety of materials like braided nylon, wire mesh, and cable ties that create colorful forms affixed to buildings or suspended from galleries. This latest work was created for the UNIQA Art Lodz project curated by Michal Biezynski.

You can see more of Wagner’s work on Instagram and at Hashimoto Contemporary. Hyperbolic will remain on view through December, 2016 and you can see more photos of it on StreetArtNews. (thnx, alley!)





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