Tag Archives: installation

Gravity-Defying Shoes Installed on the Streets of London by Pejac 

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All photos by Gary Van Handley.

For his first ever public intervention in London, street artist Pejac (previously) created four installations of sneakers hanging from lamposts with a slight twist: the shoes dangle up instead of down. The head-scratching installations titled “Downside Up” can be found around East London and are a teaser ahead of a solo show that opens next month.

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56-Foot-Tall Aluminum Honeycomb Structure Responds to the Buzzing of Bees Within London’s Kew Gardens 

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Image by Dacian Groza

Forty-four tons of aluminum was just transported and installed at London’s Kew Gardens, a beehive-inspired structure produced by the artist Wolfgang Buttress in partnership with designer and engineer Tristan Simmonds. “The Hive” was originally built as a centerpiece for the UK Pavilion at the Milan Expo 2015 where it won the gold award for architecture and landscape. The installation both aesthetically and symbolically represents its namesake, aiming to demonstrate to visitors the importance of protecting the honeybee.

Standing nearly 56-feet-tall the work is located just beyond the gardens’ wildflower meadow, drawing visitors into the structure in the same way worker bees might return back to the hive after a long day of pollinating. In addition to being composed of thousands of pieces of metal, “The Hive” is dotted with hundreds of LED lights that coordinate with a soundtrack of buzzing from within the hive. These elements illuminate and hum in response to real bees housed at Kew, giving visitors a peek into the minute-by-minute energy and mood levels of the gardens’ bees.

Berlin-based photographer Dacian Groza was one of the photographers documenting the installation, and took many of the photographs seen here. Educated as an architect, he has a unique eye for the buildings and installations he documents, bringing special attention to timing and composition. You can see more of his architectural images on his website and Instagram.

“The Hive” reopens at the Kew Gardens on June 18, 2016 and will be open to the public through November 2017.

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Image by Dacian Groza

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Image by Dacian Groza

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Image by Dacian Groza

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Image by Jeff Eden

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Image by Jeff Eden

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Image by Jeff Eden

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Image by Dacian Groza

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Image by Dacian Groza

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Reinvigorating Wroclaw’s Riverside With Site-Specific Chair Installations 

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All images via No Studio

Collaborative duo No Studio, comprised of Polish artists Magda Szwajcowska and Michal Majewski, have placed several architectural interventions in their native city of Wrocław in an attempt to repopulate an area that has become forgotten about and neglected. The project fits site-specific chairs onto concrete stairs that lead to the city’s river, bright blue furniture that also acts as loveseat sunbeds for passersby. The pieces are installed as a part of the DOFA 2016 Lowersilesian Festival of Architecture, which is comprised of works around this year’s slogan of “Spaces for Beauty.”

You can view more of No Studio’s miniature architectural works on their website. (via Designboom)

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New Labyrinths of Poured Salt by Motoi Yamamoto Cover the Floors of a French Castle 

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“Floating Garden,” all images © Motoi Yamamoto

Motoi Yamamoto (previously here and here) meticulously sculpts large scale installations formed from salt, tiny lines delicately arranged on the floor of galleries and museums. In his latest exhibition titled “Univer’sel,” Yamamoto has created two pieces in a 13th-century medieval castle in Aigues-Mortes, located in the south of France.

The first piece, ‘Floating Garden,” is installed in a circular room, appearing like swirling clouds or thick ocean foam. Without a walkway it is impossible to view the piece up close, viewers only able to view Yamamoto’s labor from afar. The second piece, “Labyrinth” is arranged in a stone passageway within the castle’s ramparts. The appearance of the work mimics the title, a maze that becomes more detailed the further it grows from a mountain-like pile of salt towards the back of the installation.

“Univer’sel” opened May 17 and also includes the salt works of Jean-Pierre Formica. Their work will be on display through November 30. (via Designboom)

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“Floating Garden”

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A Subterranean Camera Obscura Captures the English Countryside 

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Collaborative duo Anna Heinrich and Leon Palmer were so impressed by the view overlooking the rolling hills of Hadleigh Country Park in Essex, England that they decided to capture it in perpetuity. Instead of simply taking a photograph, Heinrich & Palmer decided to submerge a camera obscura into the ground, imbedding an 11.5-foot Weholite pipe into the side of a hill to be easily accessible by the nearby bike path.

The Reveal” was created to fit four to five people, and the 260 mm lens of the camera is fixed within the door, which needs to be closed tight in order for the “live” image to appear bright. Once you are securely inside, the bright scenery from outdoors comes in, snapping into focus on the back wall. Because of its location against the vast southern skies, Heinrich & Palmer explain that the landscape seems to fall away in the distance, and the passing ships give the image the quality of a moving oil painting.

The two installation artists met while studying fine art in Cardiff in the late 80s and have now been collaborators for over 20 years. Their work focuses mostly on the large scale, including films, installations, photography, and light boxes. You can see more of the artists’ work on their website.

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The Floor of an Historic Church Transformed Into a Reflective Pool of Multi-Colored Orbs by Liz West 

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All images by Hannah Devereux

Reflecting the architecture of the former St. John’s Church in North Lincolnshire, UK is Liz West‘s site-specific pool of over 700 multi-colored orbs titled “Our Colour Reflection.” These circular mirrors installed onto the floor of the now 20-21 Visual Arts Centre project hues of yellow, purple, red, blue, and 11 other colors onto the beams that surround them, adding a colorful dimension to the 125-year-old building.

“The work changes constantly, depending on what time of day it is,” West told The Creators Project. “As darkness comes, the gallery spotlights reflect off the colored mirrors and send vivid dots of color up into the interior of the former church building, illuminating the neo-Gothic architecture.”

Visitors can peer into the reflective pool to see how it refracts their own image, inserting themselves simultaneously into the history and artistic intervention of the space. The installation is also a reference to stained glass, as West focused on the history of the arts center as a former place of worship before starting the installation. You can catch the multi-colored light refractions of “Our Colour Reflection” through June 25, 2016. (via The Creators Project)

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