Tag Archives: installation

Levitating Clouds Provide a Dreamlike Resting Place During the Festival des Architectures Vives 

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Images by Paul Kozlowski

The Festival des Arcitectures Vives in Montpellier, France grants access to the courtyards of private hotels and other buildings typically restricted to the general public, filling these outdoor areas with installations that reflect the architecture that surrounds the temporary artworks. For the 2016 festival, the French collaborative duo Michaël Martins Afonso and Caroline Escaffre-Faure brought architecture’s universal backdrop down to eye level, floating several large clouds throughout one of the selected courtyards.

The project, which they have titled “Head in the Clouds,” provides a relaxing dreamland away from the bustling city, inviting attendees to sit or stand within the fluffy orbs. Although the symbolism of the piece is direct, the installation does provide a meditative area for those to take a step back and think, dream, or scheme amongst the hovering works.

You can see more images from this installation and the rest of the festival on the Festival des Architectures Vives’ Instagram. (via Designboom)

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The Lunar Cycle Displayed Through 15,000 Colorful Origami Birds 

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All images via Mathgoth Gallerie

Mademoiselle Maurice (previously here and here) recently produced the mural “The Lunar Cycle” in collaboration with the French Mathgoth Gallerie, a temporary piece that pays tribute to the hundreds of residents who were temporarily uprooted due to the upcoming demolition of the building. Composed of 15,000 colorful origami birds, the piece forms the cycles of the moon against the dark background of the wall and covers over 21,000 square feet of space—making it the largest urban mural ever created in Paris. Each origami is painted after folding using a solution deemed “Maurigami” by Mademoiselle Maurice, making the pieces nearly indestructible. You can see more of her original origami-based murals on her Instagram and Facebook. (via Faith is Torment)

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Guerrilla Crocheting Adds a Splash of Color to the Streets of Stockholm 

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Stockholm-based street artist Julia Riordan became obsessed with knitting and crochet at the age of 10 and eventually launched her own line of knitware in 2012. Soon after she started forays into yarn bombing around London and now continues in Sweden, where she recently installed this fun piece titled Splash. More on Instagram. (via StreetArtNews)

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Technicolor Rainbow Tape Floor Installations by Jim Lambie 

Collectively titled Zobop, Jim Lambie's vinyl tape installations mark off floors and stairs with colorful and repeating patterns, typically consisting of seven to nine rotating hues. The site-specific works conform to the architectural outline of each space, tracing the sharp edges of moulding or square bases of monumental columns. To begin each new work Lambie first outlines the widest possible edge, typically starting where the floor meets the wall. From here, he alternates widths for his lines, mixing up thin strips with those that are a couple of inches thick until he reaches the center of each space.

Lambie’s first work in Zobop was completed in 1999 during a solo exhibition of the same name at The Showroom in London. Since this first exhibition, Lambie has continued to make the concentric works, using materials that could be easily accessed at any office supply store. You can see more of his colorful installations at Anton Kern Gallery. (via Contemporary Art Blog)

Image via My Pet Buffalo

Image via My Pet Buffalo

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Gravity-Defying Shoes Installed on the Streets of London by Pejac 

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All photos by Gary Van Handley.

For his first ever public intervention in London, street artist Pejac (previously) created four installations of sneakers hanging from lampposts with a slight twist: the shoes dangle up instead of down. The head-scratching installations titled “Downside Up” can be found around East London and are a teaser ahead of a solo show that opens next month.

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56-Foot-Tall Aluminum Honeycomb Structure Responds to the Buzzing of Bees Within London’s Kew Gardens 

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Image by Dacian Groza

Forty-four tons of aluminum was just transported and installed at London’s Kew Gardens, a beehive-inspired structure produced by the artist Wolfgang Buttress in partnership with designer and engineer Tristan Simmonds. “The Hive” was originally built as a centerpiece for the UK Pavilion at the Milan Expo 2015 where it won the gold award for architecture and landscape. The installation both aesthetically and symbolically represents its namesake, aiming to demonstrate to visitors the importance of protecting the honeybee.

Standing nearly 56-feet-tall the work is located just beyond the gardens’ wildflower meadow, drawing visitors into the structure in the same way worker bees might return back to the hive after a long day of pollinating. In addition to being composed of thousands of pieces of metal, “The Hive” is dotted with hundreds of LED lights that coordinate with a soundtrack of buzzing from within the hive. These elements illuminate and hum in response to real bees housed at Kew, giving visitors a peek into the minute-by-minute energy and mood levels of the gardens’ bees.

Berlin-based photographer Dacian Groza was one of the photographers documenting the installation, and took many of the photographs seen here. Educated as an architect, he has a unique eye for the buildings and installations he documents, bringing special attention to timing and composition. You can see more of his architectural images on his website and Instagram.

“The Hive” reopens at the Kew Gardens on June 18, 2016 and will be open to the public through November 2017.

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