Tag Archives: installation

Hand-painted Ceramic Plate Installations by Molly Hatch

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Quand on Aime Tout est Plaisir: After Fragonard, USA, 2013

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Quand on Aime Tout est Plaisir: After Fragonard, USA, 2013

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Recite, USA, 2014. 199 hand-thrown porcelain porcelain plates with glaze and underglaze, acrylic paint, hardware.

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Recite, detail.

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Covet Project, 2012.

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Covet Project, 2012.

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Deconstructed Lace: After Royal Copenhagen, USA, 2014. 93 hand-thrown and hand-painted porcelain plates with glaze and underglaze.

Massachusetts-based artist Molly Hatch creates immense installations of hand-built ceramic plates painted with a variety of patterns and scenes. Hatch frequently re-contextualizes historic images used centuries ago by old porcelain manufactures as well as paintings and textiles. Her largest artwork to date, Physic Garden, was installed last year at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, a monumental installation of 475 plates depicting imagery used on Chelsea Factory plates dating back to the 1750s. Hatch is represented by Todd Merrill Studio, and you can see more work on her website. (via Design*Sponge, My Amp Goes to 11)

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A Perpetual Whirlpool of Black Water Installed in a Gallery Floor by Anish Kapoor

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Anish Kapoor. “Descension” (2014) ©Anish Kapoor 2015

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via webindia123.com

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“If one is talking about sculpture then scale and skin is everything,” declared Anish Kapoor. He was speaking from India, the birthplace of the acclaimed sculptor, where his latest installation was part of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale. The skin of the object is what defines it, he goes on to explain, while scale creates a certain mystery around the object. Kapoor’s latest work, Descension, has both of these elements.

Unexpectedly set into the gallery floor is a large, seemingly endless hole. In it, a vortex of black water perpetually froths and churns. The whirlpool alters the form, or skin, of the water creating a fury of liquid that invades the walls of the gallery. Descension was on view in a corner room at the Aspinwall House in Fort Kochi, a meaningful location because the room opens to views of a peaceful sea that creates a striking contrast to the powerful whirling vortex. (via Designboom)

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Giant Tree Sculpture Cast from the Trunk of a 140-Year-Old Hemlock

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Photo by John Grade

Recently unveiled at the MadArt space in Seattle, Middle Fork is the lastest sculptural work by artist John Grade who worked with countless volunteers to realize this enormous scale mold of a 140-year-old tree.

The process began a year ago when Grade and a crew of assistants scaled a Western Hemlock tree in North Bend, Washington with help of a team of arborists. At nearly 90 feet in the air they created sectional plaster molds of the living tree which were carefully lowered and transported back to the MadArt space over a period of two weeks. Over the next 12 months, hundreds of volunteers (some who walked in right off the streets) helped to create a hollow sculpture of the tree using hundreds of thousands of small wood blocks. The final piece was carefully sanded down and is now suspended in the gallery. Watch the video below to see how it all came together.

Middle Fork is the first exhibition at the new MadArt space in Seattle and will be on view through April 25th before it goes on tour to galleries and art fairs around the U.S. In two years the pieces will be transported to the base of the living tree from which the mold was taken where they will decay and disintegrate back into the ground.

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Photo by John Grade

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Photo by John Grade

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Photos by John Grade

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Photos by John Grade

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Photos by John Grade

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Photos by John Grade

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Photo by Tim Detweiler

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Photo by Katie Wood

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New Moon: An Interactive Light Installation Made from 5,500 Repurposed Light Bulbs

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New Moon is an interactive shadow and light sculpture from artists Caitlind r.c. Brown and Wayne Garrett (previously) that was installed twice in Lexington, Kentucky back in February of last year. Built from 5,500 burnt out incandescent bulbs donated by the community, the sculpture allows viewers to manipulate phases of the moon using a large turnstyle. The piece is the fourth in a series of installations using re-appropriated light bulbs, more of which you can explore on their website.

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Mushroom Book Installations by Melissa Jay Craig

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Cast and hand-shaped abaca, embellished with cotton rag; each copy 14-18″H x 15″W x 16-18″D. Edition of 99.

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(S)Edition is an installation of 99 books made to look like common Amanita Muscaria mushrooms by Chicago artist Melissa Jay Craig. The installation has been shown in a various configurations the last few years, and only once in its entirety at the Morgan Conservatory in Cleveland, Ohio back in 2010. From her statement about the installation:

Fungus is an agent of change. I’m fascinated with its myriad forms, and I love to go in search of it. I can become more excited by discovering a beautiful fungal growth than by perusing artwork ‘discovered’ for us by curators in contemporary museums. When I was a child, the first time I had the intriguing feeling that the planet carried messages (texts, if you will) for those who were curious enough to look, was when I came upon a group of Amanita Muscaria, huddled together in a dark, secret space under tall pines.

You can see more views of these fungal books on her website. (via Green Chair Press)

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New Dreamlike Scenes from Inside JeeYoung Lee’s Tiny Art Studio

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Within the small confines of her 3 x 6 meter studio in Seoul, JeeYoung Lee‘s imagination is without boundaries. For each of her photographs the artist fills every square inch of space with hand-made props, set pieces, and backdrops and never edits or modifies the image digitally post-shoot. We first featured Lee’s work on Colossal last year, and OPIOM Gallery has since shared several more installations spanning from 2008 to 2014. Via OPIOM:

She does so with infinite minutiae and extraordinary patience, in order to exclude any ulterior photographic alteration. Thus materialised, these worlds turn real and concretise; imagination reverts to the tangible and the photo imagery of such fiction testify as to their reality. In the midst of each of these sets stands the artist, those self-portraits however are never frontal, since it is never her visual aspect she shows, but rather her quest for an identity, her desires and her frame of mind. Her creations act as a catharsis which allows her to accept social repression and frustrations.

It should be noted that Lee’s photography seems to be influenced, at least conceptually, by artist Sandy Skoglund. Her latest exhibition titled Stage of Mind will appear in both Bogota and Belfast later this summer. (via My Modern Met)

Update: Lee will also be exhibiting several pieces at Gallery Nine 5 in New York later this week.

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Twilights: New Ink Paintings on Vintage Books by Ekaterina Panikanova

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Celestial phenomena, 2014, books, wood, nails, ink, acrylic, cm210x260.

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Impersonal verbs, 2014, books, wood, nails, ink, acrylic, cm 130×110; In my garden flowered a rose, 2014, books, nails, wood, inks, acrylic, cm 210×150.

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Box n°86, 2014. Books, inks, wood panel, nails, ink, acrylic, cm 76,5×55.

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Untitled, 2014. Old and vintage books, inks, nails on wood panel, cm 200×143.

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Pars particularis, 2014, books, wood, nails, ink, acrylic, cm 140×120; Aux sages-femmes, 2014, books, wood, nails, ink, acrylic, cm 130×110.

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Errata Corrige #2234, 2013. Vintage book, inks, nails on wood panel; cm 130×110. Private Collection.

Artist Ekaterina Panikanova (previously) recently opened her third solo show at Sara Zarin Gallery in Rome featurning a number of ink and acrylic paintings on grids of vintage books. Reflecting the age of the books, Panikanova creates imagery suggesting aspects of memory or old snapshots commingled with illustrations of birds, antlers, baked goods, and lace. To compliment the installations she also created a number of glass and lead pieces you can see here. The exhibition, titled Crepuscoli (Twilights), runs through February 7th.

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