installation

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Art Design

Art in Ad Places: A New Book Collects 52 Public Artworks Installed in Pay Phones Across NYC

February 20, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Artwork by Andrea Sonnenberg, all installation images by Luna Park

Artwork by Andrea Sonnenberg, all installation images by Luna Park

Frustrated by the daily bombardment of advertising on the streets of New York City, artist Caroline Caldwell and writer RJ Rushmore decided to produce a project that would dampen the sheer volume of visual marketing strewn throughout their environment. The pair didn’t have the budget to prompt an entire overhaul, but they did have the incentive to construct an intervention that would offer an alternative glimpse to the city’s high volume of print-based advertisements.

For their 2017 project, Art in Ad Places, the pair recruited 55 artists and collectives from across the country to produce 55 works to be temporarily displayed on pay phone booths across New York City. The installations were each presented for a week, and documented by their collaborator, street art photographer Luna Park.

“Pay phones were a perfect choice because they’re disappearing from the streets,” Rushmore told Colossal. “So I’d like to say that our ad takeovers were intended as a swan song for pay phones. Plus, contemporary pay phones serve no real function except to serve advertising, and that feels wrong. Nobody’s using pay phones to make calls, so why do we put up with their ads?”

The 52-week campaign ended in December of last year, however it has recently been compiled into a new book that documents the year-long installation. Art in Ad Places: 52 Week of Public Art Across New York City is available through Rushmore’s street art blog Vandalog and features statements from each artist alongside essays written by the project’s three collaborators. You can see the entire range of poster-sized artworks produced for Art in Ad Places on the project’s website or Instagram.

Bones Not Bombs by Pat Perry

Bones Not Bombs by Pat Perry

My Ad is No Ad by John Fekner

My Ad is No Ad by John Fekner

Artwork by For Freedoms with Hank Willis Thomas

Artwork by For Freedoms with Hank Willis Thomas

"I HATE THE SOUND OF SILENCE" by Cheryl Pope

“I HATE THE SOUND OF SILENCE” by Cheryl Pope

Artwork by Martha Cooper

Artwork by Martha Cooper

The Ecstasy of St Katsuhiro Otomo by Nomi Chi

The Ecstasy of St Katsuhiro Otomo by Nomi Chi

Stop Telling Women to Smile by Tatyana Fazlalizadeh

Stop Telling Women to Smile by Tatyana Fazlalizadeh

Artwork by Louise Chen aka Ouizi

Artwork by Louise Chen aka Ouizi

Blue Lady by Parker Day

Blue Lady by Parker Day

 

 



Art

Suspended Ocean Wave Installations by Miguel Rothschild

February 19, 2018

Christopher Jobson

Elegy, 2017. Print on fabric, fishing line, lead balls, epoxy, acrylic, 300 x 550 x 280 cm

Multidisciplinary artist Miguel Rothschild works across a wide variety of mediums from modified photography to glass sculpture and textiles. In several recent works the Argentine artist has captured the slow roll of ocean waves in suspended fabric installations titled Elegy and De Profundis. Both artworks seem to play with the viewer’s perception, appearing both as waves or perhaps a slice of the sky. Even the filament that holds the artwork airborne seems to glisten like rays of sun or rain. You can see more of the Berlin-based artists work on his website.

De profundis, 2018. On view at St. Matthäus-Kirche, Berlin.

 

 



Art

A Single Book Disrupts the Foundation of a Brick Wall by Jorge Méndez Blake

February 14, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

The Castle is a 2007 project by Mexican artist Jorge Méndez Blake that subtly examines the impact of a single outside force. For the installation, he constructed a 75 x 13 foot brick wall that balances on top of a single copy of Franz Kafka’s The Castle. The mortarless wall bulges at the site of the inserted text, creating an arch that extends to the top of the precarious structure.

Although a larger metaphor could be applied to the installation no matter what piece of literature was chosen, Méndez Blake specifically selected The Castle to pay tribute to Kafka’s lifestyle and work. The novelist was a deeply introverted figure who wrote privately throughout his life, and was only published posthumously by his friend Max Brod. This minimal, yet poignant presence is reflected in the brick work—Kafka’s novel showcasing how a small idea can have a monumental presence.

 

 

 



Art

The Subverted Architecture and Twisted Objects of Alex Chinneck

February 8, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Birth, death, and a midlife crisis

British sculptor Alex Chinneck (previously) upends the steady, reliable nature of banal structures that we interact with every day through his architectural interventions. Overturned swaths of car parking lots, twisted broomstick handles, and inverted building facades are executed with such precise detail that it is difficult to determine where reality ends and surreality begins. Chinneck describes one particular piece to It’s Nice That as “sculpturally bold but contextually sensitive,” which seems an apt description of his entire body of work. You can see more on his website and Instagram. (via It’s Nice That)

Take my lighting but don’t steal my thunder

Take my lighting but don’t steal my thunder

Under the weather but over the moon

Broom

Telling the truth though false teeth

Telling the truth through false teeth

Pick yourself up and pull yourself together

Pick yourself up and pull yourself together

A bullet from a shooting star

 

 



Art

Geronimo Fills Lincoln Center with a Massive Balloon Installation for the New York City Ballet

February 2, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photo by Erin Baiano for NYCB

Jihan Zencirli is not your average balloon artist. Based in Los Angeles and working under the moniker Geronimo, Zencirli builds sprawling conglomerations of perfectly spherical balloons in carefully selected color palettes. With vibrant colors and organically-inspired shapes, the balloons draw a contrast to the geometric and neutral toned buildings they are affixed to. The artist frequently installs her work outside, to emphasize its ephemeral nature and to allow as many people to encounter the work as possible.

Zencirli’s latest creation has been produced in collaboration with the New York City Ballet, as part of their Art Series. The annual series invites a contemporary artist to install a site-specific artwork in the heart of Manhattan at Lincoln Center, where the ballet has been based since 1964. This is the series’ sixth year and Zencirli is the first female artist to be selected. In anticipation of the event, an appropriately-over-the-top video introduces audiences to Geronimo, directed by Andy Bruntel.

The artwork was unveiled on January 26, and remains up until February 24th, during which time the Ballet has two special performances. There are also public viewing hours every day of the week from February 17 – 25. More information about performance times and viewing hours are available on NYCB’s website. Zencirli shares updates of her work on Instagram, and you can also find examples of some previous installations below.

Photo by Erin Baiano for NYCB

Photo by Erin Baiano for NYCB

Photo by Erin Baiano for NYCB

Photo by Erin Baiano for NYCB

Photo by Erin Baiano for NYCB

Photo by Erin Baiano for NYCB

Photo by Erin Baiano for NYCB

Photo by Timothy Simons of Echo Market, Los Angeles

Squarespace Headquarters for Pride Parade, NYC

Noisebridge Hackerspace, San Francisco

 

 



Art

Amanda Parer’s Giant Inflatable Rabbits Invade Public Spaces Around the World

February 2, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Amanda Parer examines the relationship between humans and the natural world in her massive inflatable artworks. The Tasmania-based artist works with a team including New York based co-producer Chris Wangro. Together, Parer Studio realizes her larger-than-life versions of translucent rabbits, a series of works called Intrude.

The white fabric appears opaque during the day as it reflects sunlight. After dark, the creatures take on a different dimension: they are illuminated from within and reduce surrounding humans into diminutive silhouettes. Parer grew up in Australia, where rabbits are a non-native species and are considered a serious pest as opposed to a domestic pet; since being introduced by settlers in the late 18th century, their overpopulation has caused substantial ecological destruction. Parer describes the further cultural contradictions:

They represent the fairytale animals from our childhood – a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields. Intrude deliberately evokes this cutesy image, and a strong visual humour, to lure you into the artwork only to reveal the more serious environmental messages in the work. They are huge, the size referencing “the elephant in the room”, the problem, like our environmental impact, big but easily ignored.

Intrude, which Parer has created in a variety of sizes ranging from Small to XXL, has been exhibited at museums around the world, as well as installed at several music festivals. She encourages viewers to engage with the works, describing her smallest rabbits as “very huggable.” You can see part of the installation process in the video below, and find more of the artist’s work on her website and Facebook.

 

 



Art

Projection Wall: A Large-Scale Participatory Bubble Wall by Rintaro Hara

January 29, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Projection Wall is a floor-to-ceiling installation that produces a series of prismatic sculptures through a visitor-operated pulley system. The large-scale bubbles rise from a grid of rope as the pulley rises, which are then released into to the room by the force of eight fans set behind the soapy contraption.

The participatory work was built by Japanese artist Rintaro Hara for the 2017 Japan Alps Festival. Hara created a similar piece in 1998 titled Soap Opera, an installation inspired by the water-born aliens from the 1989 Sci-Fi Thriller The Abyss. You can see more of Hara’s moving installations (like this Rube Goldberg-inspired piece) on her website and Vimeo. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

 

 

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