Tag Archives: installation

320° Licht: A Repurposed 112-Meter High Gas Tank Converted into a Cathedral of Light

320° Licht: A Repurposed 112 Meter High Gas Tank Converted into a Cathedral of Light projection light installation
Thomas Wolf © 2014

320° Licht: A Repurposed 112 Meter High Gas Tank Converted into a Cathedral of Light projection light installation
Thomas Wolf © 2014

320° Licht: A Repurposed 112 Meter High Gas Tank Converted into a Cathedral of Light projection light installation
Gasometer Oberhausen / Wolfgang Volz / Urbanscreen

320° Licht: A Repurposed 112 Meter High Gas Tank Converted into a Cathedral of Light projection light installation
Thomas Wolf © 2014

320° Licht: A Repurposed 112 Meter High Gas Tank Converted into a Cathedral of Light projection light installation
Thomas Wolf © 2014

320° Licht: A Repurposed 112 Meter High Gas Tank Converted into a Cathedral of Light projection light installation
Thomas Machoczek © 2014

German creative studio Urbanscreen have just unveiled ‘320 Licht,’ a massive light projection inside the cathedral-like interior of the 20,000 square meter Gasometer Oberhausen in Germany (the same space that housed Christo’s Big Air Package last year). Urbanscreen utilized both the ceiling and 320 degrees of the interior space of this former gas tank to project a 22-minute loop of digital animation with 21 high-powered Epson projectors.

“This experience is based on the vastness of the Gasometer,” sound designer Jonas Wiese told the Creator’s Project. “We tried to work with that expression to make the space bigger and smaller, to deform it and to change its surface over and over while not exaggerating and overwriting the original effect of the room.” He continues, “the age of the screen is coming to an end, digital interfaces will dissolve and merge into the social space [...] we poetically contribute to this through art.”

320 Licht is part of the exhibition The Appearance of Beauty and will be on view through December 30th, 2014. Watch the included video above from the Creator’s Project to learn more about how it all came together.

New Bird & Butterfly Flip Book Machines by Juan Fontanive

New Bird & Butterfly Flip Book Machines by Juan Fontanive kinetic sculpture installation flipbook device butterflies birds automata

Artist Juan Fontanive (previously) constructs perpetually looping flip book machines that depict flying birds lifted from audubon guides and illustrations of butterflies. Part film and part sculpture, almost every aspect of the flip books are assembled by hand from the minutely toothed gears, clips, nuts, bolts, wormwheels and sprockets to the carefully screen printed imagery. Of the curious devices Gild Williams remarked, “Fontanive’s artworks seem strangely possessed, producing curiously moving animals that are neither living nor dead, or creating ghostly systems which seem to float mid-air and follow a pace and logic of their own.” You can see much more of his work over at Riflemaker.

Flora and Fauna Escape the Confines of Over 1,000 Repurposed Books

Flora and Fauna Escape the Confines of Over 1,000 Repurposed Books paper installation collage books

Flora and Fauna Escape the Confines of Over 1,000 Repurposed Books paper installation collage books

Flora and Fauna Escape the Confines of Over 1,000 Repurposed Books paper installation collage books

Flora and Fauna Escape the Confines of Over 1,000 Repurposed Books paper installation collage books

Flora and Fauna Escape the Confines of Over 1,000 Repurposed Books paper installation collage books

Flora and Fauna Escape the Confines of Over 1,000 Repurposed Books paper installation collage books

Flora and Fauna Escape the Confines of Over 1,000 Repurposed Books paper installation collage books

Flora and Fauna Escape the Confines of Over 1,000 Repurposed Books paper installation collage books

Assembled from hundreds of cutout plants and animals from repurposed textbooks, artist Andrea Mastrovito created a striking installation where a colony of bats clings to the ceiling, a flight butterflies swarm the gallery walls, and all matter of insects, mamammals and plants intermingle across the floor. The sprawling artwork spans the realms of collage, diorama and trompe-l’œil and was inspired in part by H. G. Wells’ science fiction novel The Island of Doctor Moreau. Titled The Island of Dr. Mastrovito and The Island of Dr. Mastrovito II the piece was first installed at Governors Island in New York back in 2010 and again last year in a different configuration at Mudac in Lausanne, Switzerland. Via the artist:

His starting points for this site-specific work are the two most common forms of home recreation—books and television. The title of his installation refers to H. G. Wells’ famous novel The Island of Doctor Moreau, in which the archetypal “mad” scientist experiments upon animals in order to give them human traits. In this “Island,” the artist substitutes himself for the doctor, trying to instill a new life into that which was once alive in a different way (books from paper, paper from wood, and wood from trees). Mastrovito imagines that the outside fauna take control of the abandoned house and become its proper inhabitants. Approximately 700 books were brought under the artist’s knife to cut out real-size images of animals. This trompe-l’oeil, or paper diorama, also suggests the strength of images, the infinite possibilities that knowledge—through books—can give us in order to create and re-create the world that we can only imagine.

You can see much more of Mastrovito’s work over on his website.

A Fence of Mirrors Reflects the Changing Landscape

A Fence of Mirrors Reflects the Changing Landscape mirrors installation fences

A Fence of Mirrors Reflects the Changing Landscape mirrors installation fences

A Fence of Mirrors Reflects the Changing Landscape mirrors installation fences

A Fence of Mirrors Reflects the Changing Landscape mirrors installation fences

A Fence of Mirrors Reflects the Changing Landscape mirrors installation fences

A Fence of Mirrors Reflects the Changing Landscape mirrors installation fences

Created by artist Alyson Shotz, this reflective picket fence is made entirely of mirrors and has been installed in several locations since 2003. The iteration shown here was on view through 2012 at the Storm King Art Center in New York. The fence has the uncanny ability to reflect its surroundings resulting in a barrier that is at times almost completely camouflaged, or, depending on your perspective, in stark contrast to the nearby landscape. (via Designboom)

Two Artists Live and Work on a Giant Rotating Hamster Wheel for 10 Days

Two Artists Live and Work on a Giant Rotating Hamster Wheel for 10 Days performance art installation humor architecture
Photo by Scott Lynch courtesy Gothamist

Two Artists Live and Work on a Giant Rotating Hamster Wheel for 10 Days performance art installation humor architecture
Photo by Scott Lynch courtesy Gothamist

Artists Alex Schweder and Ward Shelley have constructed a giant wood hamster wheel with a 25-foot-diameter where the duo are currently living and working for 10 days until March 9 at the Boiler in Williamsburg, Brookyln. Why? Because …art! Titled In Orbit, the piece is a continuation of numerous installations where the artists live together in public spaces including Counterweight Roommmate and Stability which they refer to as “architectural performance pieces.”

For In Orbit, the rotating house is designed so that Shelley can live on the exterior of the wheel nearly 30 ft. off the floor, while Schweder lives on the inside due to a fear of heights. Through coordinated movements the pair can rotate the wheel to access beds, desks, chairs and even a kitchen-bathroom combo. You can learn more over at Gothamist and Peirogi Gallery. Photos and video by Scott Lynch. (via Laughing Squid)

Metropolis II: A Kinetic Sculpture That Circulates 100,000 Miniature Cars Every Hour

Metropolis II: A Kinetic Sculpture That Circulates 100,000 Miniature Cars Every Hour multiples installation cars

This is a lovely video about Metropolis II, an impressive kinetic installation that circulates 100,000 toy cars every hour through a vast network of 18 tracks. Created by conceptual artist Chris Burden, the piece has been on view since 2011 at the Los Angeles Museum of Art. Via the museum:

Chris Burden’s Metropolis II is an intense kinetic sculpture, modeled after a fast paced, frenetic modern city. Steel beams form an eclectic grid interwoven with an elaborate system of 18 roadways, including one six lane freeway, and HO scale train tracks. Miniature cars speed through the city at 240 scale miles per hour; every hour, the equivalent of approximately 100,000 cars circulate through the dense network of buildings. According to Burden, “The noise, the continuous flow of the trains, and the speeding toy cars produce in the viewer the stress of living in a dynamic, active and bustling 21st century city.”

Video by Supermarché.

Unzipping Public Spaces One Giant Zipper at a Time

Unzipping Public Spaces One Giant Zipper at a Time zippers Japan installation humor

Unzipping Public Spaces One Giant Zipper at a Time zippers Japan installation humor

Unzipping Public Spaces One Giant Zipper at a Time zippers Japan installation humor

Unzipping Public Spaces One Giant Zipper at a Time zippers Japan installation humor

Unzipping Public Spaces One Giant Zipper at a Time zippers Japan installation humor

Unzipping Public Spaces One Giant Zipper at a Time zippers Japan installation humor

For the last few years Japanese artist Jun Kitagawa has been installing these giant zippers in public locations around Japan. The 2D and 3D artworks have appeared in buildings, on walls, and even in public ponds, revealing a peek of what lies just below the surface. You can see more over on his blog.

Surprisingly, Kitagawa is not the only artist in Japan working with zippers in public spaces. Artist Yasuhiro Suzuki conceived of a zipper boat back in 2004. The vessel takes advantage of the wake behind the boat to make it look like a giant zipper is unzipping the water. (via Spoon and Tamago)

Giant Suspended Net Installations by Janet Echelman

Giant Suspended Net Installations by Janet Echelman Vancouver nets installation

Giant Suspended Net Installations by Janet Echelman Vancouver nets installation

Giant Suspended Net Installations by Janet Echelman Vancouver nets installation

Giant Suspended Net Installations by Janet Echelman Vancouver nets installation

Giant Suspended Net Installations by Janet Echelman Vancouver nets installation

Giant Suspended Net Installations by Janet Echelman Vancouver nets installation

Giant Suspended Net Installations by Janet Echelman Vancouver nets installation

In the late 1990s artist Janet Echelman traveled to India as a Fulbright Scholar with the intention of giving painting exhibitions around the country. She shipped her painting supplies ahead of time and landed in the fishing village of Mahabalipuram to begin her exhibitions with one major hitch: the painting supplies never arrived. While walking through the village Echelman was struck by the quality and variety of nets used by the local fisherman and questioned what it might look like if such nets were hung and illuminated in the air. Could it be a new approach to sculpture? A new chapter in her artist career was born, and the artist has since dedicated her time and energy to creating these massive net sculptures in locations around the world.

Echelman is currently embarking on her largest piece ever, a 700-foot-long sculpture that will be suspended over Vancouver next month in conjunction with the 30th anniversary of the TED Conference. In collaboration with the Burrard Arts Foundation, she’s currently seeking funding via Kickstarter to make it happen. There’s all kinds of great prints, postcards, and shirts available so check it out.

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