installation

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Art

Recycled Shirts and Ski Equipment Take on Sculptural Dimensions in Layered Works by Kaarina Kaikkonen

February 4, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Kaarina Kaikkonen, "I Sprouted Into New Dimensions" (2017), Mixed media, 96.46 x 163.39 x 8.66 inches, via Galerie Forsblom

Kaarina Kaikkonen, “I Sprouted Into New Dimensions” (2017), Mixed media, 96.46 x 163.39 x 8.66 inches, image via Galerie Forsblom

Finnish artist Kaarina Kaikkonen (previously) transforms old consumer products into sculptural works that are presented both in galleries and as sprawling site-specific installations. In her large-scale apparel-based works, lines of shirts hang in orderly lines above city streets, while in smaller pieces like “I Feel Safe” (2015), she creates an angel-like formation with spread shirt sleeves as wings. In 2015, the artist built a site-specific installation in Tempere, Finland using Finnish cross country skis to create a colorful support for an angular building.

You can take an further look into her studio in this video produced in connection with her 2018 exhibition “You Remain in Me” at the KUNSTEN Museum of Modern Art in Aalborg, Denmark, and see more images of her sculptures on her website and via Galerie Forsblom.

"Only a Breath of Wind" (2010), Men's shirts, 15.75 x 133.86 x 47.24 inches, image via Galerie Forsblom

“Only a Breath of Wind” (2010), Men’s shirts, 15.75 x 133.86 x 47.24 inches, image via Galerie Forsblom

"I Feel Safe" (2015), Men's shirts and child's clothes, image via Sara Zanin Gallery

“I Feel Safe” (2015), Men’s shirts and child’s clothes, image via Sara Zanin Gallery

L: "Whereabouts" (2014), Man's jacket, 93.5 x 61.5 x 6 inches, R: "Night Hawkmoth" (2014), Man's jacket, hook, 24.5 x 28 x 7 inches, images via Galerie Forsblom

L: “Whereabouts” (2014), Man’s jacket, 93.5 x 61.5 x 6 inches, R: “Night Hawkmoth” (2014), Man’s jacket, hook, 24.5 x 28 x 7 inches, images via Galerie Forsblom

Image from 2014 exhibition with Galerie Forsblom

Image from 2014 exhibition with Galerie Forsblom

"The Upsurging Spirit" (2015), Old Finish cross country skis, site-specific, Tempere, Finland, image via Sara Zenin Gallery

“The Upsurging Spirit” (2015), Old Finish cross country skis, site-specific, Tempere, Finland, image via Sara Zenin Gallery

 

 



Art

A Decade of Daniel Arsham’s Material Explorations Opens at Amsterdam’s MOCO Museum

January 29, 2019

Sasha Bogojev

Daniel Arsham, "Hidden Figure" (2011), all images by Sasha Bogojev

Daniel Arsham, “Hidden Figure” (2011), all images by Sasha Bogojev

Connecting Time is an exhibition that spans a decade of work by Daniel Arsham (previously), and was organized in collaboration with Galerie Ron Mandos and Perrotin for MOCO Museum in Amsterdam. In addition to the debut of Calcified Room and a specially designed iteration of Amethyst Ball Cavern, is one of the iconic pieces Hidden Figure (2011) from the Elastic Walls series. The piece is constructed from fiberglass, paint, and joint compound, and is a classic example of the artist’s ongoing play with the perception of physical space in addition to his experimentation with material properties.

Arsham continually challenges the notion of what 3-dimensional art should be by creating the illusion of familiar materials or architectural elements performing in unusual ways. Pieces like Corner Knot (2008) and Falling Clock (2012) are prime examples of this way of working, and are positioned opposite of each other in the artist’s 10-year showcase.

"Corner Knot" (2008) and "Falling Clock" (2012)

“Corner Knot” (2008) and “Falling Clock” (2012)

Arsham’s entire series of sculptural pieces from his fictional archaeology series dominates the basement of the museum. This body of work was directly inspired by the artist’s visit to Easter Island several years ago, and the uncertainty about the real history of the island’s monumental sculptures. Inspired by the idea of creating future artifacts, Arsham developed a whole range of different procedures and techniques to create eroded and decayed versions of po culture items. Using geological substances such as volcanic ash, rose quartz, obsidian, and glacial rock, he continuously adds new items to this opus, each time constructing the latest artifact with different material.

Although he has previously taken objects from areas that he is personally attached to, such as sports, music, or pop culture, the show in Amsterdam includes a new series of works created from flat, printed works such as books, magazines, and food packaging. You can follow Arsham’s latest work, projects, and releases on Instagram, and visit Connecting Time until September 30th, 2019 at MOCO Museum in Amsterdam. Another solo exhibition, Static Mythologies, is also on view in Amsterdam at Galerie Ron Mandos through March 16, 2019.

"Hidden Figure" (detail)

"Basketball Rack" (detail)

“Basketball Rack” (detail)

"Basketball Rack"

“Basketball Rack”

"Miami Heat Jacket"

“Miami Heat Jacket”

"Miami Heat Jacket" (detail)

“Miami Heat Jacket” (detail)

"Arm Spanning Corner"

“Arm Spanning Corner”

"Calcified Room" (2019)

“Calcified Room” (2019)

"Amethyst Ball Cavern"

“Amethyst Ball Cavern”

"Amethyst Ball Cavern" (detail)

“Amethyst Ball Cavern” (detail)

 

 



Art

Willow Branches Shaped into Flowing Abstract Installations by Laura Ellen Bacon

January 25, 2019

Andrew LaSane

"Murmuration" (2015), Flanders Red willow, installed at the Holburne Museum in Bath, UK. Photograph by Nick Smith Photography. All images courtesy of Laura Ellen Bacon.

“Murmuration” (2015), Flanders Red willow, installed at the Holburne Museum in Bath, UK. Photograph by Nick Smith Photography. All images courtesy of Laura Ellen Bacon.

British sculptor Laura Ellen Bacon twists, ties, and knots pieces of willow and other raw materials to create large-scale abstract sculptures which she installs both inside and outside of architectural structures. The pieces often involve several stages of sketching, and weeks of weaving using her hands and few other tools. Bacon’s twisting reddish-brown forms hug and scale buildings, walls, and other existing space and landscapes in interesting and intimate ways.

“My work often ‘grows’ from a host structure as I’m very interested in the tension between built, planned structures, and the ‘unplanned’ organic form that may grow upon it,” the artist tells Colossal. “I’m also very interested in the human scale of handmade structures and have created several woven spaces in recent years that people can enter inside—creating and entering the work can be a very sensory experience.”

Bacon finds interest and inspiration in nature and natural phenomena, like the swirling patterns or murmurations formed by some flocking birds. The visual poetry, scale, and juxtaposition of each piece to its setting can be seen from a distance, but it takes a closer approach to appreciate the seemingly chaotic web of expertly intermingled natural materials.

In addition to developing two very large pieces that will use several tons of stone and willow, the artist says that she will be exhibiting a new work with jaggedart at this year’s Collect: International Art Fair for Modern Craft and Design. The fair opens at London’s Saatchi Gallery on February 28 and runs through March 3, 2019. You can view more of her sculptures by visiting her websiteInstagram, and Twitter.

Murmuration, photograph by Nick Smith Photography

Murmuration, photograph by Nick Smith Photography

Murmuration, photograph by Nick Smith Photography

Murmuration, photograph by Nick Smith Photography

"Exposed," Flanders Red willow, installed at Blackwell, The Arts and Crafts House. Photographer: Laura Ellen Bacon

“Exposed,” Flanders Red willow, installed at Blackwell, The Arts and Crafts House. Photographer: Laura Ellen Bacon

Exposed, photograph by Tony West

Exposed, photograph by Tony West

Laura Ellen Bacon installing her work "Exposed" at Blackwell, The Arts and Crafts House, photograph by Tony West

Laura Ellen Bacon installing her work “Exposed” at Blackwell, The Arts and Crafts House, photograph by Tony West

"Course" (2015), Dicky Meadows willow, installed at Hall Place in London, UK, photograph by Steve Hickey

“Course” (2015), Dicky Meadows willow, installed at Hall Place in London, UK, photograph by Steve Hickey

Course, photograph by Steve Hickey

Course, photograph by Steve Hickey

"Split Forms" (2012), Dicky Meadows willow, installed at New Art Centre in Roche Court, Wiltshire UK, photograph by Laura Ellen Bacon

“Split Forms” (2012), Dicky Meadows willow, installed at New Art Centre in Roche Court, Wiltshire UK, photograph by Laura Ellen Bacon

Split Forms, photograph by Laura Ellen Bacon

Split Forms, photograph by Laura Ellen Bacon

 

 



Art

Sunlight Casts Shadows of Phrases Exploring Theories of Time in a Street Art Installation by DAKU

January 15, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Pseudonymous Indian street artist DAKU recently installed an immersive text-based work in Panjim, Goa. Placed along 31st January Road, a fishnet structure suspends letters above pedestrians. The region’s abundant sunlight pours through to cast shadows on the street, spelling out tropes about the passage of time. Some of the phrases include, “Time works wonders. Time moves. Time flies over us, but leaves its shadow behind. Time fades. Time is an illusion.” The temporary installation, titled Theory of Time, was supported by the public art nonprofit St+art India, as part of the Start Goa festival.  DAKU often integrates language into his urban interventions. You can see more from the artist on Instagram.

 

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Art

Nine Satellite-Shaped LED Installations Visualize the Moon’s Phases

January 7, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Nine rotating LED works light up the sky with full, waxing, and waning phases of the moon in a new installation by Taipei-based arts studio Whyixd. The work, #define Moon_, is installed on the campus of National Chiao Tung University in Hsinchu, Taiwan, and provides a completely different visual experience depending on the angle. Utilizing motors, the LED lights spin to create each shape, providing a kinetic element to the satellite-shaped structures.

The name of the project, “#define Moon_” is based off of the computer directive “#define.” The underscore denotes a part of uncompleted code, thus asking the viewer to create their own interpretation of how the installation, or moon itself, serves as a contemporary influence. You can see other kinetic light installations by the art collective, such as their Shanghai-based whirling light installation Dandelion, on their website, Instagram, and Youtube. (via designboom)

 

 



Art Photography

Dreamlike Balloon Compositions by Charles Pétillon Form Hovering Clouds and Lines in Space

November 28, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Charles Pétillon (previously here and here) arranges groups of balloons in unlikely places—tying bundles of the light white objects to the top of aircraft loading stairs, or positioning them between concrete blocks at the ocean’s edge. Recently the photographer has been focusing on producing sculptural lines in space by linking several of his preferred subject matter together end-to-end, or placing them on top of polls in open landscapes. These images, along with a site-specific balloon installation, are included in Pétillon’s solo exhibition Stigmates at Danysz Gallery in Shanghai through January 10, 2019. You can see more of his balloon compositions on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Vibrant Gradients of Suspended Yarn Reflect HOTTEA’S Personal Memories

November 21, 2018

Andrew LaSane

“Odd Numbers”

Eric Rieger, known by the moniker HOTTEA (previously), is a graffiti writer turned installation artist whose medium of choice is yarn. With it, he creates colorful large-scale works inspired by the moments, experiences, and people in his life. Whether flowing down from the ceiling of a gallery, or interlaced across the top of a pedestrian pathway, Rieger’s installations always hold a connection to his past and those who helped shape it.

“Color to me represents memories and experiences,” Rieger told Colossal, “so in a way it is always in play. It all depends on what really strikes me at the moment of the installation.” When asked about his process, the artist revealed that it’s largely inspiration and concept that dictates form. “I have always let life unravel itself naturally and that informs my artistic practice. I let the space and my thoughts guide me, and from there I create a design based on what I am going through at the time.”

“Migration”

Rieger credits his retirement from graffiti as the catalyst that got him to his current work. “Not being able to paint anymore inspired to me to create something totally opposite,” he said, adding that the two practices are very different. “As a graffiti writer I only painted at night, I kept it from my family and I only practiced my artist name. Doing work under HOTTEA, I create all of my work during the day to interact with people, I share it with my family and create installations inspired by them… everything that I was as a graffiti writer I didn’t want to be as HOTTEA.”

Rieger’s grandmother taught him to knit at a young age, which is part of the family influence expressed through his work and his identity as an artist. “The very name HOTTEA is derived from a memory I have of my mother ordering hot tea on the weekends at Baker Square growing up,” he explained. “The name reminded me of all the good times we had as a family there and when my parents were still together. HOTTEA brings me absolute pure joy – it’s something I will fight for till the very end.” (via My Modern Met)

“I Bet You Are Flying Inside”

“Bad Dreams”

“Hot Lunch”

“Passageway”

“Romance”