installation

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Art

Origami Lava Pours from the Window of an Abandoned Building in Catalonia for LLUÈRNIA

November 12, 2018

Christopher Jobson

As part of the recent LLUÈRNIA festival of light and fire in Catalonia, collaborators David Oliva of SP25 Arquitectura and Anna Juncà of Atelier 4 created this spectacular flow of lava using common fortune teller origami figures. Over 10,000 folded pieces of paper were needed to create the work that was illuminated from underneath and further brought to life with smoke machines. Titled simply “Origami Lava,” the piece was affixed to an abandoned building in Olot, a town surrounded by dormant volcanoes. You can see more at SP25 Arquitectura. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

Two Hundred and Seventy Plastic Bags Rhythmically Inflate in a New Installation by Nils Völker

November 9, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Two hundred and seventy white garbage bags hang like ghosts in the columned hall of Vienna, Austria’s Museum für agewandte Kunst (MAK) for the exhibition Sagmeister & Walsh: Beauty. The piece is by Nils Völker (previously), and is titled after the number of bags present in the installation. Over 1000 precisely installed fans and 45 circuit boards keep their movement on track, helping to rhythmically inflate and deflate the hanging plastic objects. The repetitive crinkling fills the vast hall, creating an audio texture akin to the rustling of tissue paper or the sound of the tide on a sandy beach.

The concave installation is divided into nine segments that each contain two columns of plastic bags. While viewing the piece from the front you can only make out the white mass of plastic. Viewing it from the side or rear however, reveals the massive amount of cables and circuitry needed to make what appears to be such an effortless piece of art function. Two Hundred and Seventy is on view at MAK in Vienna through March 2019.

 

 



Art

An Immersive New Exhibition by OSGEMEOS Combines Street and Folk Art

October 29, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

After almost three months of working on-site at the Mattress FactoryOSGEMEOS (previously) revealed Lyrical, one of their most intimate and complex presentations to date. The exhibition includes a vast array of the Brazilian twins’ work, including paintings, sculptures, murals, in situ interventions, audio elements, found objects, and an impressive zoetrope sculpture originally created for their 2014 Ópera da Lua exhibition in São Paulo. An entire section of the show is built with pieces from their private collection, which includes folk art they’ve acquired during their travels. These collected works are displayed alongside small-scale pieces created especially for the exhibition.

Growing up in the bustling and multicultural Cambuci neighborhood of São Paulo, the brothers were exposed to hip hop at an early age. The pair started off as breakdancers, and have also dabbled as DJs and MCs before eventually becoming graffiti writers. Through street art, OSGEMEOS discovered their city’s rich culture, which helped develop their unique universe which they continue to expand upon today. Their installations, murals, and paintings are filled with colorful characters that imitate everyday people and friends, brought together to express the rich culture of the hip hop and graffiti world. You can visit Lyrical at the Mattress Factory through August 4, 2019.

 

 



Art Design

Lust For Light: A New Book of Illuminated Installations, Sculpture, and Images in Contemporary Art

October 15, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Liz West

Liz West

Once only used to illuminate a painting or photograph, light is now commonly used as the medium itself—glowing brightly from neon tubes, programmed as an interactive installation, projected to create an intangible feeling of warmth, or flashing as an LED spectacle. In her book Lust for Light published by Gingko PressHannah Stouffer (previously) culls the practices of a variety of artists such as Liz West, Miguel Chevalier, James ClarJun Hao Ong, and Yayoi Kusama to present a wide selection of more traditional and daring examples of light-based work.

Stouffer tells Colossal that while working for the last year and a half on the 376-page collection she was overwhelmed and humbled by the impact of light, while also fascinated by what it represents. “All of the artists in this book are working to recreate its likeness, utilize it as a source of their work, and capture the inspiring glow that it produces,” she continues. “There is both a fascination and familiarity with this elemental, undeniably appealing form of energy, which is both tangible and completely uncontainable.”

There will be a release party with art installations and projections at the Ace Hotel in Los Angeles on October 25th, 2018. You can now find Lust for Life on The Colossal Shop.

James Clar

James Clar

James Clar

James Clar

Phillip K. Smith III

Phillip K. Smith III

Signe Pierce

Signe Pierce

Jun Hao Ong

Jun Hao Ong

Robert Montgomery

Robert Montgomery

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama

 

 

 



Art Photography

Suspended Groups of Umbrellas, Lollipops, and Plates Swarm the Isle of Man in New Photographs by Thomas Jackson

October 9, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Umbrellas photographed on the Isle of Man, 2018, all images © Thomas Jackson

Umbrellas photographed on the Isle of Man, 2018, all images © Thomas Jackson

Thomas Jackson (previously) uses man-made objects to imitate the self-organizing behavior of large groups of birds, fish, or insects in his ongoing series “Emergent Behavior.” For this project, the San Fransisco-based artist clusters brightly colored umbrellas, plates, or streamers together with the help of imperceptible filament, which makes the objects appear as if they are floating through the landscape on their own.After each installation he makes sure to recycle and dispose of all items responsibly, with no damage occurring to the environment during installation or take down.

Recently he was invited to the Isle of Man to build several new works inspired by the island’s coastline, groves, and moors. The group of images will be exhibited later this year at Jackson Fine Art in Atlanta. You can see more examples of the artist’s photography on his website and Instagram.

"Tutus no. 4," photographed in San Francisco, California in 2018

“Tutus no. 4,” photographed in San Francisco, California, 2018

Tutus photographed on the Isle of Man, 2018

Tutus photographed on the Isle of Man, 2018

Paper plates photographed on the Isle of Man, 2018

Paper plates photographed on the Isle of Man, 2018

Streamers photographed on the Isle of Man, 2018

Streamers photographed on the Isle of Man, 2018

Lollipops photographed on the Isle of Man , 2018

Lollipops photographed on the Isle of Man , 2018

"Take Out Containers no. 2," photographed in Montara, California, 2018

“Take Out Containers no. 2,” photographed in Montara, California, 2018

"Turkey Roasters no. 1, " photographed in Mojave Desert, California, 2018

“Turkey Roasters no. 1, ” photographed in Mojave Desert, California, 2018

"Nylons no. 1," photographed in Edisto, South Carolina, 2017

“Nylons no. 1,” photographed in Edisto, South Carolina, 2017

 

 



Art

Nearly 50 Artists Descend on a 19th-Century Convent in Catalonia During the Creença Art Residency

October 9, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

Ernest Zacharevic / All photos courtesy Vinny Cornelli, Streetlayers

This past July and August, the Creença Art Residency hosted an ambitious, multi-artist project an hour outside of Barcelona. Initiated and curated by Void Projects, a new platform created by artist Axel Void, and organized in collaboration with Elsa Guerra, Jofre Oliveras and Charlotte Pyatt, the project hosted some 50 multidisciplinary artists from across the globe to create in situ work associated with the theme of Creença, or “belief.”

Artists were invited to present their interpretation of the subject from a personal, religious, or epistemological perspective inside Konvent, a former 19th-century convent in the town of Cal Rosal. Although once home to a bustling textile industry, the location is now practically abandoned. Despite its lack of resources, the location turns out to be the perfect setting for what organizers had in mind—a creative community living and working together under one roof.

The building’s faded hallways and bare rooms were transformed into studios and sleeping dorms for guests during the summer event. The close proximity of daily life and creation made the entire setting feel particularly motivating and inspiring, and pushed all the participants to create exceptional examples of their diverse practices. The location also provided a perfect opportunity for spontaneous collaboration, which occurred both on-site with paintings, sculptures, and drawings, and with installations within the ruins of a crumbling textile factory next door.

After hosting local and national artists for two months, Konvent opened its doors to the public for a three-day exhibition. The show was a mix between a massive group exhibition and an open studio event, which provided guests insight into the process behind the varied works. To celebrate the collaborative spirit nurtured during the residency, a sister exhibition opened at Montana Gallery in Barcelona early last month. You can learn more about Konvent and its recent collaborative projects on their website and Instagram. All photos by Vinny Cornelli unless otherwise noted.

Jofre Oliveras and Stefan Krische

Isaac Cordal

Amaya Suberviola

Axel Void

L.E.O.

Axel Void

BOICUT

 

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Art

A Gargantuan Purple Sea Monster Lurks Inside a Two-Story Warehouse at Philadelphia’s Navy Yard

October 8, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Image via Conrad Benner / Streets Dept

Twenty inflatable tentacles extend from the roof and several windows of a two-story warehouse in Philadelphia’s Navy Yard, making it appear as if sea monsters have attacked the former naval storehouse in an installation titled Sea Monsters HERE. The massive work is the largest inflatable sculpture ever created by UK-based artists Filthy Luker (previously) and Pedro Estrellas. It was produced in partnership with Group X, an anonymous collective of local artists and curators, and the Navy Yard which extends along the Delaware River.

The purple tentacles range from 32 to 40 feet, and curl upwards to reveal green suction cups lining their inner surface. Luker and Estrellas have been collaborating on inflatable sculptures since 1996, you can see more of their recent works on Instagram and their website, Designs in AirSea Monsters HERE will be on view both day and night through November 16, 2018. You can view a video tour of the installation in a video produced by Foxx below.