installation

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Art

The Haze: A New Immersive Experience by teamLab Places Visitors at the Center of a Swirling Vortex

August 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

The Haze is a new immersive digital art installation from Japanese collective teamLab (previously) which situates guests at the center of a light-based vortex. The work uses light, fog, and sound to wrap guests in a mesmerizing cacophony of swirling spotlights which are reflected by a mirrored floor. A similar experience is created in the work Light Vortex II, which uses the same elements to choreograph an entirely different light show.

TeamLab recently opened Borderless, a 100,000 square feet museum dedicated to their digital installations in Tokyo. You can view more videos documenting the group’s projection-based works on their website and Vimeo.

 

 



Art

New Miniature Warning Signs and Other Humorous and Unexpected Interventions by Michael Pederson

August 22, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Michael Pederson, a.k.a. Miguel Marquez Outside (previously), installs miniature signs, work sites, and queues in unassuming locations, transforming ordinary plants and objects into moments of intrigue for unsuspecting passersby. In one recent work he tracks the lifespan of a solitary weed poking through a sidewalk crack. A tiny wooden ladder leans against a sign that marks the number of days the plant has been growing. In another work he installed two small stanchions in front of a hole in a stone wall. A small sign reads “Please wait here until called,” presenting the illusion that a mouse-sized club or popular eatery exists on the other side. You can see more of Pederson’s small-scale interventions and humorous additions to commonplace landscapes on Instagram and tumblr.

   

 

 

 



Art

Over Fifteen Thousand Paper Kites Create a Two-Toned Cloud Inside New York’s St. Cornelius Chapel

August 21, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All images by Timothy Schenck

All images by Timothy Schenck

A mass of circular black paper and bamboo kites merges with a collection of identically designed white ones inside Governors Island’s St. Cornelius Chapel in an installation titled The Eclipse. Created by artist Jacob Hashimoto (previously), the paper orbs hang from the ceiling by pieces of string to comprise a layered formation that appears like roving waves or clouds. This is the second iteration of the labor-intensive installation, which premiered at the Palazzo Flangini during the 57th Venice Biennale.

An additional large-scale work by Hashimoto titled Never Comes Tomorrow, which consists of hundred of wood cubes and colorful steel funnels, is installed outside of the chapel in Liggett Hall Archway. The dual installations can be visited on Governors Island seven days a week through October 31, 2018. You can find specific hours for the installation on the Governors Island website, and see more of Hashimoto’s works on his website. (via Fubiz)

 

 



Art

Mirrored Installations by Sarah Meyohas Create Infinite Tunnels Strewn With Dangling Flowers

August 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

In artist Sarah Meyohas‘s series Speculations, infinite tunnels are created with facing mirrors set against pastel backdrops. Smoke, flowers, and finger tips border the reflective surfaces, creating dream-like environments that pull the viewer deep into the image’s frame. Meyohas is interested in the creating a seductive quality in each of the photos. “Whether it’s the colors or the flowers drawing you in, I want viewers to feel like they’re being drawing into the void, like standing upon a precipice,” the New York City-based artist tells Sleek Magazine. You can see more of her mirrored works on Instagram. (via Contemporary Art Blog)

 

 



Art

Rugged Multi-Color Paintings by Dylan Gebbia-Richards Mirror the Textures of Molten Rock

August 10, 2018

Anna Marks

Credit: Wes Magyar

Credit: Wes Magyar

Breathtakingly colorful textures pop out when viewers first witness Dylan Gebbia-Richards’s large-scale paintings which appear to escape from their canvas. His rugged works mirror the structure of natural forms such as molten rock or coral. “I see my works as their own landscapes,” Gebbia-Richards tells Colossal. “I allow chance, the driving force behind all natural phenomena, to sculpt the structures of my paintings.”

Gebbia-Richards gains his inspiration from the vastness of the natural world and his artworks explore aesthetics that merge between the microscopic and macroscopic. “I find the enormity of the natural world awe-inspiring,” he esplains. “Landscapes which are immense seem intimate simultaneously; counter-intuitively these large spaces create the feeling of an embrace.”

Credit: Dylan Gebbia-Richards

Credit: Thomas Meyers

Credit: Thomas Meyers

While Gebbia-Richards’ paintings vary in size, all are built to engulf the viewer. “Sometimes this is very literal like in my room-sized installations which encompass those inside,” he says. “But even with my smaller pieces, I’m looking for the work to expand outwards, attempting to generate the feeling of a place which is much larger.” Like observing a mountain range, the scale of his paintings inspire and delight, while his use of a bold color palette adds a hint of magic to each creation.

Credit: Stephen Ironside

Credit: Stephen Ironside

Credit: Dylan Gebbia-Richards

The artist’s works appear as if they have been created through a volcanic eruption. To imitate this process, he constructs his paintings by using colored pigment and droplets of melted wax. “I initially found dripping and splattering melting wax very satisfying,” says Gebbia-Richards. “I was interested in the qualities of the marks the melted wax produced, specifically the chaotic patterns of the splatters which sprung from the drip’s impact with the paper I was melting over.”

His paintings emerge by separating the dripping marks from their splatter. It is these random interactions between the various pigments, drip gestures, and the splatter which creates Gebbia-Richards’s layered textures that are signature to his practice. You can see one of the Colorado artist’s paintings at Looking For U at Unit London which runs until August 26, 2018. To view more of his work visit his website and Instagram.

Credit: Thomas Meyers

Credit: Steven Ironside

Credit: Danielle Webster

Credit: Thomas Meyers

 

 



Art Craft

Lucy Sparrow’s ’80s Style Supermarket Offers 31,000 Handmade Felt Items

August 8, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

All images by Michael Anthony Hernandez

After setting up shop in a London corner store and NYC-style bodega, Lucy Sparrow (previously) has grown her unusual art showing/selling technique into a full-blown ’80s-style supermarket. Taking up 2,800 square feet of the Standard Hotel in Downtown LA, the British artist’s fifth large-scale installation is quite literally stuffed with replicas of everyday products, each handmade from felt. The shelves are packed with different ramen and instant noodle soups, Reese’s Puffs, Frosted Flakes and other popular cereals, three different brands of peanut butter along with Smucker’s grape or strawberry jelly, a whole range of favorite snacks, chips, pasta or rice, and all the essential personal hygiene products.

In 2014 Sparrow successfully used Kickstarter to fund her first major project in London called The Corner Shop, which offered 4,000 hand-sewn felt products. Three years later she hopped across the pond to open 8 ‘Til Late, a bodega located in Manhattan at The Standard, High Line with 9,000 items that sold out a couple of days before the official closing date. Challenged by the demand for her plush groceries, the artist locked herself inside her Felt Cave studio for a year and produced her largest and most elaborate project to date — Sparrow Mart.

The retro shop has all the familiar selections of American comforts, including a videotape rental section with ’80s classics like Footloose, Dirty Dancing, and Short Circuit. She also has fresh hand-sewn seafood on ice, sushi, fruits and vegetables, a variety of meat cuts and other animal products, popular snacks, canned goods, cereals, candies, sodas, liquor and cleaning products. Each item is meticulously cloned from felt, a material that evokes childhood and play. The fact that the store offers 27 different types of sushi (each produced in 300 pieces), plus chopsticks, wasabi, pickled ginger, and even soy sauce packed inside iconic plastic fish containers, says a great deal about the amount of detail and determination that went into creating this overwhelming installation. Working alone until very recently, the artist ended up hiring four full-time assistants in her studio and outsourcing fifteen professionals to complete this immersive project.

Offering a felt ATM in between the isles, an exclusive gallery section in the back, and ending with three felt checkout stations, each of the 31,000 products on view is available for purchase with prices ranging from $5 for bubblegum to $73 for a kimchi Michelada. Sparrow Mart is open through the end of August 2018 from 11am-9pm (closed Mondays). The installation is accompanied with Sparrow To Go, a 24/7 restaurant in the lobby of the hotel, offering dishes inspired by the items in Sparrow Mart and prepared by the hotel’s executive chef Julio Palma. After this, the artist is considering creating a similar installation in Chicago, Dallas, Melbourne, or somewhere in Asia, like Hong Kong or Tokyo. You can see more from Sparrow on Instagram.

 

 



Design

A Series of Japanese Benches Showcase How Pencils Are Made

August 7, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Images via @pomo

A series of benches that surround the Mitsubishi Pencil headquarters in Tokyo give step-by-step instructions for how the brand’s pencils are made. The concrete and wood furniture dot the perimeter, adding a creative touch to the public space just beyond the company’s walls. (via Spoon & Tamago)

 

 

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